logo
Department of Archaeology
   
   
  

If you wish to get in touch with our administrative staff, please see the admin staff contact page.

Image of Christopher Loveluck

Christopher Loveluck

Associate Professor and Reader, Faculty of Arts

Contact

Biography

Site Director for University of Nottingham, Midlands-3-Cities Doctoral Training Programme

Director of Research, School of Humanities, 2013-14

Associate Professor and Reader in Medieval Archaeology, 2009 - present

Archaeology Editor, Early Medieval Europe, 2009- 2011

Visiting Professor of Medieval History and Archaeology, Department of History, Harvard University, Mass., USA, September 2007 to February 2008.

Lecturer in Medieval Archaeology, Department of Archaeology, University of Nottingham, UK, 2004 - 2008.

Chercheur (temp.), CNRS, University of Tours, France, February to April 2004.

British Academy Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Department of Archaeology, University of Southampton, UK, October 2000 to February 2004.

Director of the Flixborough Anglo-Saxon settlement post-excavation and publication project (funded by English Heritage), Humber Field Archaeology, September 1995 to October 2000.

PhD in Archaeology (University of Durham), July 1995.

BA (Hons) in Archaeology (University of Durham), June 1990.

Expertise Summary

The development of societies in northwest Europe, between Late Antiquity and the Central Middle Ages (AD 400 and 1300), with particular reference to landscape and settlement archaeology, and coastal communities.

Teaching Summary

Undergraduate Teaching

The range of my undergraduate teaching covers the archaeology of northern and western Europe in the Middle Ages, between c. AD 400 and 1500. I convene and teach on the following modules:

V61121 - Introduction to Medieval Archaeology (10 credits)

Q3107S - The Viking World (10 credits)

V62209 - Medieval Britain (10 credits)

V63345 - The Archaeology of Anglo-Saxon England (20 credits)

At MA and MA by Research levels I teach the following 30-credit options for the V64ST1 and V64ST2 options.

V64ST - Britain and West Francia from the Carolingians to the Crusades, AD 600-1200

V64ST - The Archaeology of Anglo-Saxon England.

Supervision of PhD and MRes students:

I supervise PhD and MRes students on a range of themes, mostly in relation to early medieval northern Europe, between c. AD 400 and 1400. These themes have included, rural settlement dynamics, trade and exchange, the development of ports and urban centres, coastal societies, and aspects of representation of the past. My PhD students have focused their studies geographically on England, Wales, Flanders, northern France, Spain, the North Atlantic and Saudi Arabia.

My PhD students who have been awarded their Doctorates since 2007: Gareth Davies, Edward Oakley, Imogen Tompsett, Anne Sassin, Alexander Mirrington, Dayanna Knight (Loveluck as principal supervisor); Kristopher Poole (Loveluck as secondary supervisor).

PhD students who have submitted their theses and await examination: Rebecca Reynolds (Loveluck as secondary supervisor).

Current PhD students: Diane Wren, Alaa Alrawaibah, Craig Dicken.

Current MRes students: Hillery Harrison, Paul Wright.

Teaching prizes and commendations:

Harvard University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences Teaching Prize for the course 'Material Cultures, England and France, AD 600-1200' , Fall Semester 2007-8 (Reading seminar course for graduate students)

Harvard University Teaching Commendation for courses in Fall semester 2007 -8, from Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Science (D. Pillbeam).

Research Summary

Between 2003 and the present, I have been directing/undertaking five principal research projects:

  • The writing of a book on Northwest Europe in the Early Middle Ages, AD 600-1200, for Cambridge University Press, funded by the British Academy and the AHRC. The book presents a comparative archaeological analysis of societies in England, France, Belgium, the Netherlands and Rhineland Germany, between the seventh and twelfth centuries, funded by the British Academy. (see publications and www.cambridge.org/9781107037632 ).
  • The survey and excavation of a fifth- to twelfth-century central place at Stavnsager, northeast Jutland, Denmark, seemingly covering 150 hectares, funded by the British Academy (see Stavnsager).
  • The co-ordination of the early medieval working group, with Prof. Martin Carver (University of York), for the Maritime and Marine Historic Environment Research Framework for England (English Heritage/University of Southampton) since July 2009, and the publication of a research assessment and agenda for the early medieval period (see publications).
  • The Leffinge Pilot project, examining the nature of early medieval settlement and society in coastal Flanders, Belgium (see Leffinge).
  • The Flixborough Anglo-Saxon settlement project, funded by English Heritage - all four volumes have been published in 2007 and 2009, and a digital archive is to be published on the ADS - AHDS digital archive. (See Flixborough Anglo-Saxon Settlement).

Supervision of PhD and MRes students:

I supervise PhD and MRes students on a range of themes in relation to early medieval northern Europe, between c. AD 400 and 1400. These themes have included, rural settlement dynamics, trade and exchange, the development of ports and urban centres, coastal societies, and aspects of representation of the past. My PhD students have focused their studies geographically on England, Wales, Flanders, northern France, Spain, the North Atlantic and Saudi Arabia.

My PhD students who have been awarded their Doctorates since 2007: Gareth Davies, Edward Oakley, Imogen Tompsett, Anne Sassin, Alexander Mirrington, Dayanna Knight (Loveluck as principal supervisor); Kristopher Poole (Loveluck as secondary supervisor).

PhD students who have submitted their theses and await examination: Rebecca Reynolds (Loveluck as secondary supervisor).

Current PhD students: Diane Wren, Alaa Alrawaibah, Craig Dicken.

Current MRes students: Hillery Harrison, Paul Wright.

Past Research

In the 1990s, my research focussed on the development of Anglo-Saxon societies, primarily in northern England, especially on the rural settlement patterns and the complexities Anglo-Saxon society from the seventh to the eleventh centuries (See Flixborough Anglo-Saxon settlement and my publications). From 2000 onwards, I have broadened my research interests to examine evidence for lifestyles and social hierarchies amongst Continental societies from the seventh to twelfth centuries. This was achieved with the support of the British Academy and involved a series of archaeological survey projects with French and Belgian colleagues, examining the dynamics of rural societies in areas that were formerly part of the Carolingian Frankish realms, namely coastal Flanders and the Loire valley (see Leffinge and www.cambridge.org/9781107037632).

Future Research

Over the next five years my research will focus on larger scale survey and excavation at Stavnsager-Ammelhede in northeast Jutland, in order to understand whether the central place comprised several settlement foci juxtaposed, or one single settlement covering the entire 150 hectares. If the latter is true, then the settlement can be interpreted as having become one of the first towns in Denmark, between the 7th and 11th centuries. Currently, there do not appear to be significant chronological shifts in the use of space within the 150-hectare artefact scatter. Therefore, it is conceivable that the entire 150-hectare area was occupied between the later 7th/8th and 11th centuries. Key research themes will be the origins, nature and demise of the Stavnsager-Ammelhede settlement - probably relating to the silting up of the Oxenbaek-Grund Fjord waterway. A series of articles have been published in Academic Journals and edited volumes, between 2007 and 2013, to be followed by a Volume on the Surveys and pilot excavations, in turn followed by larger excavation, finds and synthesis volumes.

Department of Archaeology

University of Nottingham
University Park
Nottingham, NG7 2RD

Contact details