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Chrysanthi Gallou

Assistant Professor, Faculty of Arts

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Biography

ORCHID: 0000-0001-8946-3885

Assistant Professor of Aegean Archaeology, University of Nottingham, 2012-present

Co-Director of the Centre for Spartan and Peloponnesian Studies, 2012-present

Associate Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (AFHEA) since 2015

Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Nottingham, 2005-2011

PhD Archaeology, University of Nottingham, 2003

MA Archaeological Research, University of Nottingham, 1998

BA Hons Archaeology and History of Art, University of Athens, 1996

Expertise Summary

I am a specialist in Aegean prehistory, with particular research interests in the archeology of death and cult, the archeology of children and childhood, Aegean pottery, maritime trade and exchange networks, and development of coastal communities.

MAJOR RESEARCH PROJECTS

1. Rethinking Mycenaean Death - A view from Lakonia (study and publication of the chamber tombs at Epidaurus Limera and of the burial tradition in Mycenaean Laconia) - Principal Investigator

2. Tiny Archaeologies: Reconstructing the World of Children in Late Bronze Age Greece (Principal Investigator)

3. Pavlopetri Underwater Archaeology Project (Project Organiser and Archaeological Coordinator, UoNottingham Director of the Study of Archaeological Finds and Director of Outreach)

4. PhD Project: The Mycenaean Cult of the Dead

Research keywords: Aegean Prehistory; Archaeology of Death and Cult; Archaeology of Identity, Memory and Tradition; Archaeology of Children & Childhood; prehistoric seascapes; Aegean pottery production and exchange networks; Archaeology of Sparta and Laconia.

Teaching Summary

It is my strong belief that classes should not just be archeology courses where students just learn about the past, but more importantly, they should provide the student with the opportunity for… read more

Research Summary

1. Rethinking Mycenaean Death - A view from Lakonia

This project brings to publication the chamber tombs at Epidaurus Limera (one of the few sites in southern mainland that flourished uninterruptedly from the end of teh Middle Bronze age until after the collapse of the Mycenaean palatial administration) and -for the first time- provides a full analysis of the burial tradition in Mycenaean Laconia. The project's research aims are to:

a) examine the creation and subsequent history of the introduction of the chamber tomb type on the mainland in relation to the Middle Helladic past and the newly introduced elements;

b. provide a comprehensive account of mortuary traditions and practices in LBA Lakonia;

c. reconstruct the diachronic process of invention of tradition and identity in Mycenaean communities.

The results of the project will be published in a monograph (in final stages of completion). This project has been generously funded by INSTAP, the Shelby White-Leon Levy Program for Archaeological Publications , the J.F. Costopoulos Foundation, the University of Nottingham and the British Academy.

2. The Pavlopetri Underwater Archaeology Project www.nottingham.ac.uk/pavlopetri/index.aspx

In 2009 the Ephorate of Underwater Antiquities of the Hellenic Ministry of Culture, the Hellenic Centre for Maritime Research and the University of Nottingham under a British School of Archaeology at Athens permit began a 5-year collaborative project to outline the history and development of the submerged ancient town of Pavlopetri in southern Laconia, Greece. Over the coming years the Pavlopetri Underwater Archaeology Project aims to establish when the site was occupied, what it was used for and, through a systematic study of the geomorphology of the area, how the town and the Elaphonisos Strait became submerged.

Selected Publications

  • GALLOU, C., 2005. The Mycenaean cult of the dead Oxford: Archaeopress.
  • GALLOU, C., 2004. More than little perishers: child burials and the living society in Mycenaean Greece Ethnographisch-Archäologische Zeitschrift. 45(2-3), 365-375
  • GALLOU, C. and GEORGIADIS,M., 2006. Ancestor worship, tradition and regional variation in Mycenaean Greece. In: C. GALLOU AND M. GEORGIADIS, ed., The Archaeology of Cult and Death Archaeolingua. 125-149
  • W.G. CAVANAGH, C. GALLOU AND M. GEORGIADIS, ed., 2009. Sparta and Lakonia from Prehistory to Pre-modern times British School at Athens.

It is my strong belief that classes should not just be archeology courses where students just learn about the past, but more importantly, they should provide the student with the opportunity for critical thinking and cross-disciplinary synthesis of ideas and critical approaches.

I usually teach the following undergraduate modules (I am on research leave in 2017/18):

V63319 - The Archaeology of Mycenaean Greece

This module, based on lectures and workshops, introduces students to the archaeology of the Mycenaean world and gives them familiarity with the achievements and the material culture of one of the greatest European Bronze Age civilizations of the second millennium BC, by discussing the historical, social, cultural and economic context of the period (ca. 1700-1100 BC). It examines the rise of the Mycenaean civilisation and the early discoveries of Heinrich Schliemann at Mycenae, the rise, nature and collapse of the Mycenaean palaces, town planning and citadels, religion and cult, the social and political structure of the Mycenaean society, the workings of the palace administration and economy documented through the Linear B tablets, the Mycenaeans' enterprise overseas and their international contacts and relationships, Mycenaeans at war, mortuary practices and ancestor worship, and the Mycenaean material culture in all its aspects [including wall paintings and minor arts, pottery, high technologies (e.g. metallurgy, glass-making), industries (e.g. perfumed oils, textiles)].

V62318- Of Palaces, Art and Goddesses: The Origins and Rise of Aegean Civilisation

This module, based on lectures and workshops, provides a broadly chronologically-ordered survey of Greek prehistory from the Early Bronze Age to the early Late Bronze Age (from early 3rd to early 2nd mil. BC). In particular, it focuses on the origins of complex societies during the 3rd millennium BC and the origins, rise and nature of the Minoan palatial, state-level societies that followed. It discusses the region's long-term transformations using the available material, iconographic and archival data, and encourages thematic treatment of major social, cultural, political and economic processes such as the Neolithic antecedents; the organisation of proto-urban societies during the Early Bronze Age; transformations and developments during the Middle Bronze Age; palace state formation on Crete; production, trade and consumption in and beyond the Aegean (including: materials and industries, frescoes and the minor arts, textiles and dyes, perfumed oils); introduction and development of administration and early writing; archaeologies of cult and death; the eruption of Thera/Santorini; and the place of the Aegean within the wider Mediterranean and Near Eastern world during the Bronze Age. By the end of the module students should have gained an understanding of the broad cultural sequence in the Aegean area, of current interpretations and debates in Aegean prehistory, and of broad diachronic and regional trends in the development of human societies in the region between the late 4th and early 2nd millennia BC. On a broader level, the aim of the module is to show how archaeological material, interpreted in the light of anthropological and ethnographic studies, can help us explore human past.

V62RES- Archaeological Research: Theory and Practice

Archaeological knowledge is created through the rigorous and systematic analysis of material remains, and the use of theory to formulate research questions and build interpretations of those remains as evidence for societies in the past and present. Theory and practice are therefore interconnected and embedded at the heart of our discipline. In this module, teaching is led by research and focuses on the interrelationship between concepts, interpretive approaches and analytical frameworks in the design and implementation of archaeological research projects. In the autumn semester, students are introduced to the development of archaeological theory and interpretation, with special attention to the paradigms put forward over the last 30 years, and the ensuing debates. Topics include uniformitarianism, ethnography, typology, 'New Archaeology', processualism, post-processualism, economic archaeology and neo-Marxist paradigms. In the spring semester, this knowledge is further developed through more in-depth studies of key issues and themes, and through the exploration of archaeological research in a wide range of different areas and projects. Students also develop their own skills as independent researchers, developing a research proposal and project design on a subject which interests them, in preparation for their Dissertation or Independent Research Project in Year 3.

PhD/MRes SUPERVISION (I am on research leave in 2017/18)

I am interested in supervising research students in the areas of Aegean prehistory and Early Iron Age Greece, Sparta and Laconia, the archaeology of death, the archaeology of cult and ritual, the archaeology of colour and fashion, and the archaeology of children and childhood.

I currently (co)supervise the following PhD students:

(1) Thea Wolff, The Potnia Theron in early Greek Art

(2) Matt Thompson, Spartan Victory Monuments and Graves

(3) Paz Ramirez Valiente, Writing and Self-awareness in the Bronze Age

(4) Mila Andonova, Baskets and basketry in south-eastern European prehistory (second supervisor)

(5) Fabio Saccoccio, Cultures at the edges: Iron Age interaction in the western Veneto, northern Italy (second supervisor)

(6) Elisavet Fergadiotou, Early Islamic glass in the Persian Gulf (seond supervisor)

Current supervision of MA/MSc by Research dissertations:

1. Despoina Sampatakou, The Mycenaean perception of Deathscapes: the case of Midea/Dendra in the Argolid

2. Frasier Quar, Mycenaean religious paraphernalia

Current supervision of MA Distance Learning in Mediterranean Archaeology dissertations:

1. Anja Kuehn, The use of drugs and stimulants in Bronze Age Crete

2. Kyriakos Xanthopoulos, Osteoarchaeological analysis of two Byzantine cemeteries in the prefecture of Aitoloakarnania in western Greece

3. Alison Roberts, The evolution of Neolithic burial architecture and practices (working title)

4. Eleni Itsou, Neolithic bone tools from western Macedonia

5. Keith Ross, Assessing risks in maritime trade in the 2nd millennium Mediterranean (working title)

In previous years I have supervised the following MA and PhD theses to completion:

1. Vasilki Brouma, Understanding Hellenitic Thanatos - Death, Ritual and Identity in the south-eastern Aegean in the 3rd to 1st c. BC (PhD)

2. Claudia Alonso, The end of the Mycenaean civilisation (visiting PhD student, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid)

2. Amy Jolliffee, The Archaeology of post-palatial Achaia (MA by Research)

3. Michael Curtis, The contextualisation of three ports of Hellenistic and Roman Crete (MA by Research)

4. Petrus Scholten, Child burials in Middle Helladic Peloponnese (MA by Research)

5. Ioan Huw Espley, Recreating Maritime Trade in the Peloponnese During the Middle Helladic period (MA by Research)

6. Gerasimos Trasanis, Fortification and Defence systems in classical and Hellenistic Elis, Greece: the case of Triphyllia (MA by Research)

7. Joseph Jordan, A Comparative Analysis of Regional Feasting Practices in Late Neolithic and Early Bronze Age Aegean (MA by Research)

8. Fiona Moore, Migration and Diet in the Anglo-Saxon Trent Valley: A multi-isotope investigation (MA by Research)

9. Athanasia Panopoulou, Interpreting identical votive offerings from 8th c. BC Sparta and Tegea: the contribution of visual evidence (MA in Classical Antiquity)

9. Stephenie Tsoi, Spartan Women in in comparative perspective: a view from China

10. Lena Nieves, Early Bronze Age harbour towns in the Peloponnese in their wider Aegean context

Future Research

Tiny Archaeologies: Reconstructing the world of children in Late Bronze Age Greece

The study of Aegean childhood to date has considered children as "little adults rather than human beings and individuals living in a present" (Lillehammer 2010: 16 for the general state of research in the archaeology of children and childhood), and has focused either on a few aspects of their material culture, of constructions of age and gender, or their connection to the adult world (almost exclusively their relationship to their mothers). The aim of this new interdisciplinary research project is to redress the omission of Mycenaean children from archaeological research and introduce their interdisciplinary study to the archaeology of the Old World. Moving beyond traditional approaches to the topic, this project aims to put forward a child-centred approach in which Mycenaean children are linked to aspects of time, space, culture and identity, as well as to topics related to their own relationship with their peers and to the adult community. The methodological approach incorporates: a) data collection (from burials, depictions, texts, architectural space and children's material culture); b) source criticism combining, where appropriate, the disciplines of archaeology and art history, physical anthropology, developmental cognitive neuropsychology and the sociology of childhood. This project is the result of my long-standing research interest in the archaeology of children and childhood in the past, and the results of the project will be published in a monograph.

Relevant publications:

submitted - 'Children and Death in the Bronze and Early Iron Age Aegean', in L. Beaumont et al. (eds), Children in Antiquity: Perspectives and Experiences of Childhood in the Ancient Mediterranean. Routledge.

in preparation - 'Of white hair and feeding bottles: Exploring children-elderly interactions in prehistoric Aegean', in Gr. Lillehammer and E. Murphy (eds), The Young and the Old in Past Societies. AmS-Skrifter Series.

2015. '"What would the world be to us if the children were no more?": The archaeology of children and death in LH IIIC Greece', in Z. Theodoropoulou-Polychroniadis and D. Evely (eds), Festschrift in honour of Mrs Matti Egon, pp. 57-67. Oxford: Archeopress.

2010. 'Children at work in Mycenaean Greece (ca. 1680-1050 BC): A brief survey' in L. Brockliss and H. Montgomery (eds), Children and Violence from the Greeks to the Present, pp. 162-167. Oxford: Oxbow.

2004 'More than little perishers: the case of child burials in Mycenaean Greece', Ethnographisch-Archäologische Zeitschrift 45, pp. 365-375.

  • C. GALLOU, 2016. Mycenaean skulls: “αμενηνά κάρηνα"or social actors in Late Helladic metaphysics and society? In: Metaphysis. Ritual, Myth and Symbolism in the Aegean Bronze Age. Proceedings of the 15th International Aegean Conference, Vienna, Institute for Oriental and European Archaeology, Aegean and Anatolia Department, Austrian Academy of Sciences and Institute of Classical Archaeology, University of Vienna, 22-25 April 2014, edited by E. Alram-Stern et al.. 405-414
  • C. GALLOU, 2015. "What would the world be to us if the children were no more?": The archaeology of children and death in LH IIIC Greece. In: Z. THEODOROPOULOU-POLYCHRONIADIS and D. EVELY, eds., Aegis. Essays in Mediterranean Archaeology presented to Matti Egon by the Scholars of the Greek Archaeological Committee. Arcchaeopress. 57-67
  • GALLOU, C. and HENDERSON, J., 2012. Pavlopetri, an early Bronze Age harbour town in South-East Laconia Pharos: Journal of the Netherlands Institute in Athens. 18(1), 79-104
  • J. HENDERSON, C. GALLOU, N.C. FLEMMING AND E. SPONDYLIS, 2011. The submerged prehistoric town at Pavlopetri in southern Greece. In: J. BENJAMIN, CL. BONSALL, C. PICKARD AND A. FISCHER, ed., Underwater Archaeology and the Submerged Prehistory of Europe Oxbow. 207-218
  • C. GALLOU AND M. GEORGIADIS, 2010. Funerary games and the Mycenaean cult of the dead Groniek. 185, 383-393
  • GALLOU, C., 2010. Children at work in Mycenaean Greece (ca. 1680-1050 BCE): a brief survey. In: BROCKLISS, L. and MONTGOMERY, H., eds., Childhood and violence in the Western tradition Oxbow Books. 162-171
  • CAVANAGH, W.G., GALLOU, C. and GEORGIADIS, M., eds., 2009. Sparta and Laconia from prehistory to pre-modern times: proceedings of the conference held in Sparta, organised by the British School at Athens, the University of Nottingham, the 5th Ephoreia of Prehistoric and Classical Antiquities and the 5th Ephoreia of Byzantine Antiquities 17-20 March 2005 British School at Athens.
  • M. GEORGIADIS AND C. GALLOU, ed., 2009. The Past in the Past: The significance of memory and tradition in the genesis and transmission of culture Archaeopress.
  • C. GALLOU, 2009. Epidaurus Limera: The tale of a Laconian site in Mycenaean times. In: W.G. CAVANAGH and C. GALLOU, eds., Sparta & Lakonia: From Prehistory to Pre-modern times:: Proceedings of the Conference held in Sparta, organised by the British School at Athens, the University of Nottingham, the 5th Ephoreia of Prehistoric and Classical Antiquities and the 5th Ephoreia of Byzantine Antiquities, 17-20 March 2005. British School at Athens. 85-93
  • C. GALLOU, 2008. Arcadian theriomorphic deities and their Mycenaean echoes. In: Y. PIKOULAS, ed., Stories for ancient Arcadia. International Symposium in honor of James Roy.: International Symposium in honor of James Roy. Horos Publications. 91-104
  • C. GALLOU, 2008. Between Scylla and Charybdis: Vatika in Mycenaean times. In: C. GALLOU, M. GEORGIADIS AND G.M. MUSKETT, ed., Dioskouroi.: Studies Presented to W.G. Cavanagh and C.B. Mee for their 30-year joint contribution to Aegean Archaeology BAR IS-1889. Archaeopress. 292-321
  • C. GALLOU, M. GEORGIADIS AND G.M. MUSKETT, ed., 2008. Dioskouroi. Studies Presented to W.G. Cavanagh and C.B. Mee for their 30-year joint contribution to Aegean Archaeology Archaeopress.
  • C. GALLOU AND M. GEORGIADIS, 2007. The cemeteries of the Argolid and the South-eastern Aegean during the Mycenaean period: A landscape and waterscape assessment Opuscula Atheniensia. 31-32, 171-182
  • GALLOU, C. and GEORGIADIS,M., 2006. Ancestor worship, tradition and regional variation in Mycenaean Greece. In: C. GALLOU AND M. GEORGIADIS, ed., The Archaeology of Cult and Death Archaeolingua. 125-149
  • M. GEORGIADIS AND C. GALLOU, ed., 2006. The Archaeology of Cult and Death Archaeolingua.
  • GALLOU, C., 2005. The Mycenaean cult of the dead Oxford: Archaeopress.
  • GALLOU, C., 2004. More than little perishers: child burials and the living society in Mycenaean Greece Ethnographisch-Archäologische Zeitschrift. 45(2-3), 365-375
  • GALLOU, C., 2004. Tomb design and the Cult of the Dead in Mycenaean Greece In: Cult and Death. Proceedings of the Liverpool Interdisciplinary Symposium in Antiquity.. 17-28
  • 2004. Tomb Design and the Cult of the Dead in Mycenaean Greece. In: M. GEORGIADIS, G.M. MUSKETT AND D. NAOUM, ed., Cult and Death. Proceedings of the Liverpool Interdisciplinary Symposium in Antiquity Archaeopress. 17-28
  • C. GALLOU, 2002. Ες Hλύσιον πεδίον και πείραηα γαίης: The Mycenaean sea journey to the Underworld. In: M. GEORGIADIS AND G.M. MUSKETT, ed., The Seas of Antiquity University of Liverpool. 18-33

Department of Archaeology

University of Nottingham
University Park
Nottingham, NG7 2RD

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