School of Biosciences
  • Print
   
   
 

Image of Sandra Hill

Sandra Hill

Teaching Associate, Faculty of Science

Contact

  • workRoom A28 Food Sciences
    Sutton Bonington Campus
    Sutton Bonington
    Leicestershire
    LE12 5RD
    UK
  • work0115 951 6145
  • fax0115 951 6142

Research Summary

The core of my research is to use rheology, textural assessment, spectroscopies, thermal techniques and wet chemistry to follow macromolecular structures and functions. Many studies are designed to… read more

Selected Publications

Current Research

The core of my research is to use rheology, textural assessment, spectroscopies, thermal techniques and wet chemistry to follow macromolecular structures and functions. Many studies are designed to understand and monitor changes in macromolecules during processing. For example: to understand the structure of starches and therefore be able to predict how they will process. Processing could be in excess or limited water, without shear or at high shear (e.g. thermomechanical extrusion) and could represent many sorts of foods (e.g. snackfoods or soups) or non foods (e.g. biodegradable films). Key to the behavior of these systems is their hydration and plasticisation. Not only does this affect the quality of the systems, in terms of texture and stability (e.g. retrogradation), but may also impact on taste and digestion. Using the concept of starch conversion we have shown that human foods and animal feeds can be dramatically altered in terms of their viscosity, flavour release and influence on the gut. Although substantial work is carried out on model systems, much work uses flours and complex mixtures that are closer to "real" foods or to the systems of interest. Using these systems current studies include: the role of sodium chloride in breads and breakfast cereals, the influence of different oils on the texture of biscuits, effect of diet on the viscosity of gut digestor,

Starches are not the only hydrocolloids of interest. There is substantial ongoing work with gelatin and polysaccharides, both gelling (e.g. gellan) and non gelling (e.g. xanthan). The depolymerisation for polysaccharides and polymerisation of proteins (via the Maillard reaction) continue to be projects. A linking interest in many studies is the changes occurring in all these systems as they hydrate. Recent and continuing work is showing the benefits of new hydrocolloid particulates fabricated by us that show interesting hydration performance.

School of Biosciences

University of Nottingham
Sutton Bonington Campus
Nr Loughborough
LE12 5RD, UK

For all enquiries please visit:
www.nottingham.ac.uk/enquire

Find us
Campus map
Room Locations on Campus