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Matthew Pethers

Assistant Professor in American Intellectual and Cultural History, Faculty of Arts

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Expertise Summary

My research interests are in the intellectual and cultural history of America between the early eighteenth century and the Civil War: particularly print culture and Revolutionary politics; the origins of American Romanticism; ideas of labor and knowledge during the antebellum period; early American drama; transatlantic cultural relations.

Teaching Summary

I am currently and have recently supervised PhD students working on: Ralph Waldo Emerson; John Jay; racial liminality in nineteenth-century American fiction; nineteenth-century American… read more

Research Summary

I am currently working on a book to be entitled "Period Fictions: Serial Poetics, Literary Time, and the Rise of the American Novel," which attempts to forge a connection between recent work on the… read more

Selected Publications

  • PETHERS, M., 2014. The Secret Witness: Thinking, and Not Thinking, About Servants in the Early American Novel. In: ANDREW LAWSON, ed., Created Unequal: Class and the Making of American Literature Routledge. 40-55
  • PETHERS, M., 2013. 'That eternal ghost of trade': Anglo-American market culture and the antebellum stage Yankee. In: PEEL, R. and MAUDLIN, D., eds., The materials of exchange between Britain and north east America, 1750-1900 Ashgate. 83-115
  • PETHERS, M., 2012. "I must resemble nobody": John Neal, genre, and the making of American literary nationalism. In: WATTS, E. and CARLSON, D.J., eds., John Neal and nineteenth-century American literature and culture Bucknell University Press. 1-38

BOOK REVIEWS

Review of Propaganda 1776: Secrets, Leaks, and Revolutionary Communications in Early America by Russ Castronovo. In The British Association for Romantic Studies Review 47 (2016): www.bars.ac.uk/review/index.php/barsreview/article/view/162/448

Review of New World Drama: The Performative Commons in the Atlantic World, 1649-1859 by Elizabeth Maddock Dillon. In Symbiosis: A Journal of Anglo-American Literary Relations 19.1 (2015):

Review of The Rise and Fall of Early American Magazine Culture by Jared Gardner. In Amerikastudien/American Studies 59.4 (2015): http://dgfa.de/wp-content/uploads/1_Pethers.pdf

Review of Protocols of Liberty: Communication Innovation and the American Revolution by William B. Warner. In Literature and History 23.2 (2014): 92-94.

Review of Unfinished Revolution: The Early American Republic in a British World by Sam W. Haynes. In Journal of American Studies 46.4 (2012): E1-4.

Review of Citizen Spectator: Art, Illusion, and Visual Perception in Early National America by Wendy Bellion. In Journal of American Studies 46.3 (2012): 767-768.

Review of A History of the Book in America - Volume II: An Extensive Republic: Print, Culture, and Society in the New Nation, 1790-1840 ed. Robert A. Gross and Mary Kelley. In Journal of American Studies 46.2 (2012): E10-20.

Review of The Two Faces of American Freedom by Aziz Rana. In Journal of American Studies 45.3 (2011): E1-3.

Review of Atlantic Republic: The American Tradition in English Literature by Paul Giles. In Journal of American Studies 43.2 (2009): 377-379.

Review of Men of Letters in the Early Republic: Cultivating Forums of Citizenship by Catherine O'Donnell Kaplan. In The William and Mary Quarterly 65.3 (July 2008): 627-630.

SHORTER PUBLICATIONS

"The Indentured Atlantic: Bound Servitude and the Literature of American Colonization - Part 1." U. S. Studies Online (January 2016). http://www.baas.ac.uk/usso/the-indentured-atlantic-bound-servitude-and-the-literature-of-american-colonization-part-one/

"The Indentured Atlantic: Bound Servitude and the Literature of American Colonization - Part 2." U.S. Studies Online (January 2016). http://www.baas.ac.uk/usso/the-indentured-atlantic-bound-servitude-and-the-literature-of-american-colonization-part-two/

"The Indentured Atlantic: Bound Servitude and the Literature of American Colonization - Part 3." U.S. Studies Online (January 2016). http://www.baas.ac.uk/usso/the-indentured-atlantic-bound-servitude-and-the-literature-of-american-colonization-part-three/

"Journalism." In The Bloomsbury Encyclopedia of the American Enlightenment, Volume 2, ed. Mark G. Spencer (London: Bloomsbury, 2015), 592-99.

Introduction to "Online Roundtable: A History of the Book in America." In Journal of American Studies 46.2 (2012): E1-3.

"Thomas Cooper." In The Dictionary of Early American Philosophers, Volume 1, ed. John R. Shook (New York: Continuum, 2012), 244-47.

SELECTED CONFERENCE PAPERS AND TALKS

November 2017: "When Was the First American Novel?: Belatedness, Anachronism, and the Long Publication of William Williams's Mr. Penrose (1776/1815/1966)," The 'Not Yet' of the Nineteenth Century - Third Biennial Symposium of the British Association of Nineteenth-Century Americanists, University of Exteter.

October 2017: "Portrait Miniatures: Physiognomy, Providence, and the Transatlantic Circulation of Wealth in the Post-1800 American Novel," Migration, Diaspora, Circulation and Translation - Eleventh Biennial Conference of the Charles Brockden Brown Society, University College Dublin.

September 2017: "Early American Periodical Culture and the Problem of the Picaresque," Magazines on the Move - Network of American Periodical Studies Symposium, Nottingham Trent University.

June 2017: "Dead Letters! Does it Not Sound Like Dead Networks? or, Bartleby the Scrivener: A Tale of the Post Office," Melville's Crossings - Eleventh International Melville Conference, King's College London.

April 2017: "The Detective in the Dead Letter Office: Legal Surveillance and the Nineteenth-Century Communications Network," British Association for American Studies Annual Conference, Canterbury Christ Church University.

March 2017: "Seriality, Serialization, Series: Textual Temporalities and the Legitimation of Post-Revolutionary American Fiction," Society of Early Americanists Biennial Conference, Tulsa, Oklahoma.

March 2017 (respondent): "Beyond Allegories of Nation: Early American Novels as Indices of Political Possibility," Society of Early Americanists Biennial Conference, Tulsa, Oklahoma.

May 2016: "What, When and Where Was the First American Novel?" Unpublished America Symposium, University of Birmingham

December 2015: "Going Postal: Distribution Networks and the Form of the Nineteenth-Century Magazine." American into Periodicals Studies - Network of American Periodical Studies Symposium, British Library.

November 2015: "'Dead Letters! Does it Not Sound Like Dead Networks?': Bartleby the Postman." Keywords - Second Biennial Conference of the British Association of Nineteenth-Century Americanists, University of Warwick.

October 2015: "Electric Eels and the Penurious Gentry: Native Americans, Natural Philosophy, and the Making of Middle-Cass Identity in Edward Bancroft's The History of Charles Wentworth." Recording Nature in the Early Atlantic World, 1750-1830 - Tenth Biennial Conference of the Charles Brockden Brown Society, Ybor City, Tampa, Florida

September 2015: "Becoming Proletarian: William Moraley's Unaccountable Self." British Group of Early American Historians Annual Conference, University of Sheffield.

August 2015 (invited): "Transportation Stories: Servants, Convicts, and Class Formation in the Literature of Colonial America." Eccles Centre Summer Scholars Series, British Library.

April 2015 (invited): "A Vast Collection of Particular Truths: Thomas Dobson, Encyclopaedic Knowledge and Information Overload in Post-Revolutionary America." Olin Library, Rollins College, Florida.

April 2014: "Going Postal: Distribution Networks and the Form of the Nineteenth-Century Magazine." British Association for American Studies Annual Conference, University of Birmingham.

October 2013: "Secret Witnessing: The Uncanny Servant and the Early American Novel." Acts of Alienation and Sedition, 1780-1830 - Ninth Biennial Conference of the Charles Brockden Brown Society, Universite Paris IV - Sorbonne.

July 2013: "Before America's First Fictions: English Imports, Periodical Culture, and the Colonial Rise of the Novel." Roots, Routes, and Routs: American and British Literature in the Long Eighteenth Century, University of Plymouth.

March 2013: "Parabolic Social Mobility and the Circulation of Wealth in the Post-1800 American Novel." Society of Early Americanists Biennial Conference, Savannah, Georgia.

April 2012: "The Early American Novel in Fragments: Speculative Reading and Serial Fiction in the Late Eighteenth Century." Speculations: Aesthetics, Risk, and Capital in the Circum-Atlantic World - Eighth Biennial Conference of the Charles Brockden Brown Society, CUNY Graduate Center, New York.

April 2012: "Temporality and the Serial Novel." C19: Society of Nineteenth-Century Americanists Conference, Berkeley, California.

March 2011: "The Early American Novel in Fragments: Seriality and the Making of Late Eighteenth-Century Fiction." Society of Early Americanists Biennial Conference, Philadelphia.

May 2010: "An Executioner in the Civil State: Periodical Culture and the Reimagining of Social Authority in Jeffersonian America." C19: Society of Nineteenth-Century Americanists Conference, Penn State University and Research Society for American Periodicals Panel at the American Literature Association Conference, San Francisco.

March 2010 (invited): "A Peculiar Craft: The Problem of Social Knowledge in Late Eighteenth-Century America." American History Research Seminar, Cambridge University and Critical MASS: Manchester American Studies Seminar, University of Manchester.

December 2009: "Brother Jonathan Meets John Bull: The Transatlantic Iconography of the Yankee, 1776-1830." Separateness and Kinship: Transatlantic Exchanges Between New England Britain, 1600-1900, University of Plymouth.

July 2009: "Before America's First Fictions: English Imports, Periodical Culture, and the Colonial Rise of the Novel." Narrative Dominions: on Writing the History of the Novel in English, Institute of English Studies, University of London.

May 2009: "Globalizing the Republic of Letters: Language, Provincialism, and American Print Culture at the End of the Eighteenth Century." Society of Early Americanists Panel at the American Literature Association Conference, Boston.

June 2008: "'A Vast Collection of Particular Truths': Encyclopaedic Knowledge and Information Overload in Post-Revolutionary American Print Culture." Bibliographical Society of America Panel at the Society for the History of Authorship, Reading and Publishing Conference, Oxford Brookes University.

March 2008: "The Empire of Letters: Native American Culture and the Diffusion of Knowledge in Late Eighteenth-Century America." British Association for American Studies Annual Conference, University of Edinburgh.

May 2007: "A Silent History: Notes toward a Reconstruction of the Colonial American Theatre." Southwest American Studies Forum, University of Exeter.

April 2006: "'That Grub-Street Sect': Partisan Politics and the Franklinian Image, 1790 - 1808." British Association for American Studies Annual Conference, University of Kent, Canterbury.

April 2005: "Legal Fictions: Charles Brockden Brown and the Emergence of Literary Discourse in Eighteenth-Century America." British Association for American Studies Annual Conference, University of Cambridge.

AWARDS AND HONOURS

2017-21: Elected Member of the Steering Committee of the British Association of Nineteenth-Century Americanists

2017-19: Elected Member of the Advisory Board of the Charles Brockden Brown Society

2015: Thomas P. Johnson Distinguished Visiting Scholar, Rollins College, Florida.

2014-15: Eccles Centre Fellowship, British Library.

2010-11: Early Career Research and Knowledge Transfer Grant, University of Nottingham.

2010: Overseas Conference Grant, British Academy.

2007: Barra International Fellowship, The Library Company of Philadelphia.

2006: Benjamin Franklin Fellowship, British Association for American Studies/US Embassy.

2005: Research Fellowship, JFK Insititute for North American Studies, Berlin.

2000-03: Postgraduate Research Degree Studentship, Arts and Humanities Research Council.

1999-2000: Postgraduate Taught Degree Studentship, Arts and Humanities Research Council.

ACADEMIC SERVICE

Reviewer of book and article manuscripts for: Cambridge University Press; University of Wales Press; Studies in American Fiction; Journal of American Studies; Journal of Early American History; Eighteenth-Century Studies; Journal of Social History; Religions.

I am currently and have recently supervised PhD students working on: Ralph Waldo Emerson; John Jay; racial liminality in nineteenth-century American fiction; nineteenth-century American environmentalism and landscaping; classical influences on the early American theatre; and transatlantic abolitionism.

My current and recent MRes supervisees include students working on: the indigenous Gothic in Canadian literature; ecocriticism and twenty-first century American fiction; Alexander Hamilton; and sublime representations of Niagara Falls.

Modules I have taught within the Department of American and Canadian Studies include:

Key Texts in American Social and Political Thought;

American Thought and Culture 1 - Settlement to World War 1;

American Thought and Culture 2 - World War 1 to the Present;

American Literature 2 - 1900 to the Present;

Identifiably American - An Honors Seminar;

American Enlightenment/American Gothic;

American Magazine Culture;

The American Theatre;

African American History and Culture;

and American Utopianism (for a brief introduction to the latter see my contribution to the School of Cultures, Languages and Area Studies' "Words of the World" series on Youtube: http://youtu.be/RLxe0WKZYlA).

In the coming academic year I will be teaching once again on The American Theatre and Key Texts in American Social and Political Thought.

Current Research

I am currently working on a book to be entitled "Period Fictions: Serial Poetics, Literary Time, and the Rise of the American Novel," which attempts to forge a connection between recent work on the aesthetics of early American writing and on the temporality of American literary culture by considering the crucial role that serialization played in the emergence and institutionalization of the novel-form in the United States. Treating seriality as a diverse phenomenon incorporating magazine instalments, fascicule volumes, republished editions and unofficial sequels and abridgements, I aim to show how writers ranging from Charles Brockden Brown and Susanna Rowson to Washington Irving and James Fenimore Cooper used strategies of narrative extension and interruption to establish the heteroglossic scope, mimetic realism and affective investment central to the rise of fictionality. A short essay called "The Early American Novel in Fragments: Writing and Reading Serial Fiction in the Post-Revolutionary United States," which is drawn from this project, can be found in New Directions in the History of the Novel, eds. Patrick Parrinder, Andrew Nash and Nicola Wilson (Palgrave, 2014).

I am also working on the conceptualization, dissemination and contestation of "the novel" in colonial America, drawing on both established transatlantic methodologies and emerging work on the idea of "fictionality" in order to make a case for the significant pre-history to our familiar narratives of the post-revolutionary "rise of the American novel." I have very briefly sketched out some of the parameters for this project in a contribution to a roundtable on "21st Century Studies in the Early American Novel" that I edited for the Journal of American Studies, and that also included pieces by Duncan Faherty, Thomas Koenigs, Karen Weyler, Ed White, Sian Silyn Roberts and Cathy N. Davidson. In addition, I will be co-editing (with Thomas Koenigs) a special issue of Early American Literature on the topic of fictionality in the near-future that will reflect some of the trends and approaches I am interested in developing here.

I have been collaborating too with several colleagues in the Department of American Studies at Nottingham, and at the University of Birmingham, on a project which is concerned with the networks of production underpinning American periodical culture in the nineteenth century. The first stage of this project reached fruition in a symposium, entitled Knowledge Networks: American Periodicals, Print Cultures, and Communities which took place at the University of Nottingham in May 2011 with funding from an internal Early Career and Knowledge Transfer grant. A special issue of American Periodicals which developed from this symposium - on the theme of "Networks and the Nineteenth-Century Periodical" - appeared in 2013. More information about this phase of the project can be found here: http://knowledgenetworks.wordpress.com/cfp/. We are now working on establishing a new model for American periodical production focused around the concept of the "vertical network" and presented some of our initial thoughts on this at the BAAS conference in April 2014.

Finally, in a further collaboration with another set of colleagues here at Nottingham I am co-editing (with Celeste-Marie Bernier and Judie Newman) The Edinburgh Companion to Nineteenth-Century American Letters and Letter-Writing, which will include over fifty essays by leading scholars from a range of fields. My own contribution will be an essay on "Democracy and the Dead Letter Office". This volume appeared from Edinburgh University Press in 2016.

I have recently been appointed as lead editor for Volume 2 of The Collected Writings of Charles Brockden Brown, which is contracted to appear from Bucknell University Press in 2019. More information on this volume and the Brown edition as a whole can be found here: http://brockdenbrown.cah.ucf.edu/volumes.php

I would be keen to work with students on any subject relating to the intellectual and cultural history of the Revolutionary period, and would also welcome inquiries from students more broadly interested in literary professionalism, periodical culture, the history of the book, American verse, aesthetic theory, transatlantic exchange, or the structure of knowledge between 1700 and 1860.

Past Research

In addition to my ongoing book projects I have also published a wide range of journal articles and book chapters on topics such as: the political thought of African Americans in the eighteenth century; science and its cultural reception during the post-Revolutionary period; transatlantic cultural relations and the idea of the picturesque in the early nineteenth century; the representation of Anglo-American market relations in the theatre during the Jacksonian era; literary nationalism and the historical romance in the 1820s; Georgic representations of literary labor during the American Renaissance; and the relationship between serial publication and the rise of the American novel. An interest in the remarkable cultural transformations which America underwent from the colonial period to the Civil War continues to mark my research.

SELECTED CONFERENCE PAPERS AND TALKS:

November 2017: "When Was the First American Novel?: Belatedness, Anachronism, and the Long Publication of William Williams's Mr. Penrose (1776/1815/1966)," The 'Not Yet' of the Nineteenth Century - Third Biennial Symposium of the British Association of Nineteenth-Century Americanists, University of Exteter.

October 2017: "Portrait Miniatures: Physiognomy, Providence, and the Transatlantic Circulation of Wealth in the Post-1800 American Novel," Migration, Diaspora, Circulation and Translation - Eleventh Biennial Conference of the Charles Brockden Brown Society, University College Dublin.

September 2017: "Early American Periodical Culture and the Problem of the Picaresque," Magazines on the Move - Network of American Periodical Studies Symposium, Nottingham Trent University.

June 2017: "Dead Letters! Does it Not Sound Like Dead Networks? or, Bartleby the Scrivener: A Tale of the Post Office," Melville's Crossings - Eleventh International Melville Conference, King's College London.

April 2017: "The Detective in the Dead Letter Office: Legal Surveillance and the Nineteenth-Century Communications Network," British Association for American Studies Annual Conference, Canterbury Christ Church University.

March 2017: "Seriality, Serialization, Series: Textual Temporalities and the Legitimation of Post-Revolutionary American Fiction," Society of Early Americanists Biennial Conference, Tulsa, Oklahoma.

March 2017 (respondent): "Beyond Allegories of Nation: Early American Novels as Indices of Political Possibility," Society of Early Americanists Biennial Conference, Tulsa, Oklahoma.

May 2016: "What, When and Where Was the First American Novel?" Unpublished America Symposium, University of Birmingham.

December 2015: "Going Postal: Distribution Networks and the Form of the Nineteenth Century Magazine." American into Periodical Studies - Network of American Periodical Studies Symposium, British Library.

November 2015: "'Dead Letters! Does it Not Sound Like Dead Networks?': Bartleby the Postman." Keywords - Second Biennial Conference of the British Association of Nineteenth-Century Americanists, University of Warwick.

October 2015: "Electric Eels and the Penurious Gentry: Native Americans, Natural Philosophy, and the Making of Middle-Class Identity in Edward Bancroft's The History of Charles Wentworth." Recording Nature in the Early Atlantic World, 1750-1830 - Tenth Biennial Conference of the Charles Brockden Brown Society - Ybor City, Tampa, Florida

September 2015: "Becoming Proletarian: William Moraley's Unaccountable Self." British Group of Early American Historians Annual Conference, University of Sheffield.

August 2015 (invited): "Transportation Stories: Servants, Convicts, and Class Formation in the Literature of Colonial America." Eccles Centre Summer Scholars Series, British Library.

April 2015 (invited): "A Vast Collection of Particular Truths: Thomas Dobson, Encyclopaedic Knowledge and Information Overload in Post-Revolutionary America." Olin Library, Rollins College, Florida.

April 2014: "Going Postal: Distribution Networks and the Form of the Nineteenth Century Magazine." British Association for American Studies Annual Conference, University of Birmingham.

July 2013: "Before America's First Fictions: English Imports, Periodical Culture, and the Colonial Rise of the Novel." Roots, Routes, and Routs: American and British Literature in the Long Eighteenth Century, University of Plymouth.

March 2013: "Parabolic Social Mobility and the Circulation of Wealth in the Post-1800 American Novel." Society of Early Americanists Biennial Conference, Savannah, Georgia.

April 2012: "The Early American Novel in Fragments: Speculative Reading and Serial Fiction in the Late Eighteenth Century." Speculations: Aesthetics, Risk, and Capital in the Circum-Atlantic World - Eighth Biennial Conference of the Charles Brockden Brown Society, CUNY Graduate Center, New York.

April 2012: "Temporality and the Serial Novel." C19: Society of Nineteenth-Century Americanists Conference, Berkeley, California.

March 2011: "The Early American Novel in Fragments: Seriality and the Making of Late Eighteenth-Century Fiction." Society of Early Americanists Biennial Conference, Philadelphia.

May 2010: "An Executioner in the Civil State: Periodical Culture and the Reimagining of Social Authority in Jeffersonian America." C19: Society of Nineteenth-Century Americanists Conference, Penn State University and Research Society for American Periodicals Panel at the American Literature Association Conference, San Francisco.

March 2010 (invited): "A Peculiar Craft: The Problem of Social Knowledge in Late Eighteenth-Century America." American History Research Seminar, Cambridge University and Critical MASS: Manchester American Studies Seminar, University of Manchester.

July 2009: "Before America's First Fictions: English Imports, Periodical Culture, and the Colonial Rise of the Novel." Narrative Dominions: on Writing the History of the Novel in English, Institute of English Studies, University of London.

May 2009: "Globalizing the Republic of Letters: Language, Provincialism, and American Print Culture at the End of the Eighteenth Century." Society of Early Americanists Panel at the American Literature Association Conference, Boston.

June 2008: "'A Vast Collection of Particular Truths': Encyclopaedic Knowledge and Information Overload in Post-Revolutionary American Print Culture." Bibliographical Society of America Panel at the Society for the History of Authorship, Reading and Publishing Conference, Oxford Brookes University.

March 2008: "The Empire of Letters: Native American Culture and the Diffusion of Knowledge in Late Eighteenth-Century America." British Association for American Studies Annual Conference, University of Edinburgh.

May 2007: "A Silent History: Notes toward a Reconstruction of the Colonial American Theatre." Southwest American Studies Forum, University of Exeter.

April 2006: "'That Grub-Street Sect': Partisan Politics and the Franklinian Image, 1790 - 1808." British Association for American Studies Annual Conference, University of Kent, Canterbury.

April 2005: "Legal Fictions: Charles Brockden Brown and the Emergence of Literary Discourse in Eighteenth-Century America." British Association for American Studies Annual Conference, University of Cambridge.

AWARDS AND HONOURS

2017-21: Elected Member of Steering Committee of the British Association of Nineteenth-Century Americanists

2017-19: Elected Member of the Advisory Board of the Charles Brockden Brown Society

2015: Thomas P. Johnson Distinguished Visiting Scholar, Rollins College, Florida

2014-15: Eccles Centre Fellowship, British Library

2010-11: Early Career Research and Knowledge Transfer Grant, University of Nottingham.

2010: Overseas Conference Grant, British Academy.

2007: Barra International Fellowship, The Library Company of Philadelphia.

2006: Benjamin Franklin Fellowship, British Association for American Studies/US Embassy.

2005: Research Fellowship, JFK Insititute for North American Studies, Berlin.

2000-03: Postgraduate Research Degree Studentship, Arts and Humanities Research Council.

1999-2000: Postgraduate Taught Degree Studentship, Arts and Humanities Research Council.

ACADEMIC SERVICE

Reviewer of book and article manuscripts for: Cambridge University Press; University of Wales Press; Studies in American Fiction; Journal of American Studies; Journal of Early American History; Eighteenth-Century Studies; Journal of Social History; Religions.

Future Research

In the much longer-term I'm interested in pursuing another big project. "A Peculiar Craft": Class, Virtue, and the Problem of Social Knowledge in Post-Revolutionary America, would analyse how the advent of new forms of labor and knowledge during the post-Revolutionary period led to the transformation of the American class structure and the emergence of a new understanding of who was endowed with social authority. In short, I'm interested in how the intellectual and cultural values associated with the liberal state came about as the inclusive criterion of learning and the ideal of disinterested virtue central to the Revolutionary generation fractured under the weight of political factionalism and a rapidly expanding print culture. The subsequent need to justify intellectual specialization and social egotism, as exemplified through a new emphasis on both professionalism and self-interest, is then played out with particular clarity - as I see it - within a series of disciplines and genres that came to prominence between 1776 and 1820. More specifically, this project would explore how the fraught desire to instatiate exemplars of disinterested virtue in prospect poems, political pamphlets and picaresque novels at the end of the late eighteenth century can be seen as evidence of the breakdown of an omniscient model of knowledge which underpinned republican gentility, while the early nineteenth century emphasis on a technocratic objectivity in the domains of conjectural history, legal theory and political economy can be seen as an attempt to reconstitute that model. Although I've published some work on these themes already, it remains to be seen whether this project makes it off the drawing board...

  • PETHERS, M., 2017. Transportation Stories: Servants, Convicts, and the Literature of Colonization in British America. In: PAUL LAUTER and NICHOLAS COLES, eds., The History of American-Working Class Literature Cambridge University Press. 7-24
  • PETHERS, M., 2016. Dead Letters and the Secret Life of the State in Nineteenth Century America. In: BERNIER, C. M., NEWMAN, J. and PETHERS, M., eds., The Edinburgh Companion to Nineteenth-Century American Letters and Letter-Writing Edinburgh University Press. 136-51
  • PETHERS, M., BERNIER, C. and NEWMAN, J., eds., 2016. The Edinburgh Companion to Nineteenth-Century American Letters and Letter-Writing Edinburgh University Press.
  • PETHERS, M., BERNIER, C. M. and NEWMAN, J., 2016. Introduction: Epistolary Studies and Nineteenth-Century American Letters and Letter-Writing. In: PETHERS, M., BERNIER, C. M. and NEWMAN, J., eds., The Edinburgh Companion to Nineteenth-Century American Letters and Letter-Writing Edinburgh University Press. 11-28
  • PETHERS, M., FAHERTY, D., KOENIGS, T., WEYLER, K., WHITE, E., SILYN ROBERTS, S. and DAVIDSON, C. N., 2016. 21st Century Studies in the Early American Novel Journal of American Studies. 50(3), 779-824
  • PETHERS, M., 2014. The Secret Witness: Thinking, and Not Thinking, About Servants in the Early American Novel. In: ANDREW LAWSON, ed., Created Unequal: Class and the Making of American Literature Routledge. 40-55
  • PETHERS, M., 2014. The Early American Novel in Fragments: Reading and Writing Serial Fiction in the Post-Revolutionary United States. In: PATRICK PARRINDER, ANDREW NASH and NICOLA WILSON, eds., New Directions in the History of the Novel Palgrave Macmillan. 63-75
  • PETHERS, M., 2013. 'That eternal ghost of trade': Anglo-American market culture and the antebellum stage Yankee. In: PEEL, R. and MAUDLIN, D., eds., The materials of exchange between Britain and north east America, 1750-1900 Ashgate. 83-115
  • FAGG, J., PETHERS, M and VANDOME, R., 2013. "Introduction: Networks and the Nineteenth-Century Periodical" American Periodicals. 23(2), 93-104
  • PETHERS, M., FAGG, J. and VANDOME, R., eds., 2013. Networks and the Nineteenth-Century Periodical: Special Issue of "American Periodicals" - 23 (2)
  • PETHERS, M., 2012. "I must resemble nobody": John Neal, genre, and the making of American literary nationalism. In: WATTS, E. and CARLSON, D.J., eds., John Neal and nineteenth-century American literature and culture Bucknell University Press. 1-38
  • PETHERS, M., ROUND, P. H., THOMPSON, G., FAGG, J. and BRIER, E., 2012. Online Roundtable: A History of the Book in America Journal of American Studies. 14(2), E22
  • PETHERS, M., 2009. "This small Herculean labor": literary professionalism, georgic work, and Walden Amerikastudien/American Studies. 54(2), 165-194
  • PETHERS, M., 2005. Transatlantic Migration and the Politics of the Picturesque in Washington Irving's 'Sketch Book' Symbiosis: A Journal of Anglo-American Literary Relations. 9(2), 135-58

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