Department of Classics
   
   
  

Research publications from the Department of Classics

This page gives an overview of books published by members of the Department of Classics. 

 

Bradley, Mark (2009)

Bradley, Mark (2009)

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Mar 01, 2011
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Colour and Meaning in Ancient Rome, Cambridge University Press. The study of colour has become familiar territory in anthropology, linguistics, art history and archaeology. Classicists, however, have traditionally subordinated the study of colour to form. By drawing together evidence from contemporary philosophers, elegists, epic writers, historians and satirists, in this 2009 text, Mark Bradley reinstates colour as an essential informative unit for the classification and evaluation of the Roman world. He also demonstrates that the questions of what colour was and how it functioned - as well as how it could be misused and misunderstood - were topics of intellectual debate in early imperial Rome. Suggesting strategies for interpreting Roman expressions of colour in Latin texts, Dr Bradley offers alternative approaches to understanding the relationship between perception and knowledge in Roman elite thought. In doing so, he highlights the fundamental role that colour performed in the realms of communication and information, and its intellectual contribution to contemporary discussions of society, politics and morality.
Bradley, Mark (2010)

Bradley, Mark (2010)

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Mar 01, 2011
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Classics and Imperialism in the British Empire. Oxford University Press. While the study of Classics in postcolonial worlds has received a great deal of recent attention, this is the first comprehensive study of the relationship between classical ideas and British colonialism. In this collection of essays, classical scholars and modern historians demonstrate that ideas about the Greek and Roman world since the eighteenth century developed hand-in-hand with the rise and fall of the British Empire. Beginning with the history of the British Museum and its engagement both with classical antiquity and with the opportunities provided by the British Empire, the contributors address the role of classical scholarship in understanding British colonization, the development of theories about race in Europe and beyond, the exploitation of individual classical texts as imperial discourses, ideas about imperial decline, and efforts to wrest ownership of the classical past from the dominating control of the British.
Bradley, Mark (2012)

Bradley, Mark (2012)

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Oct 30, 2013
Description
This volume examines the significance of pollution and cleanliness in the art, literature, philosophy, and material culture of the city of Rome from antiquity through to the twentieth century. Dirt, disease and pollution and the ways they are represented and policed have long been recognised by historians and anthropologists to occupy a central position in the formulation of cultural identity, and Rome holds a special status in the West as a city intimately associated with issues of purity, decay, ruin and renewal. In recent years, scholarship in a variety of disciplines has begun to scrutinise the less palatable features of the archaeology, history and society of Rome, but there remains no comprehensive study of the history of pollution within the city. Pollution and Propriety brings together scholars from a range of disciplines in order to examine the historical continuity of dirt, disease and hygiene in one environment, and to explore the development and transformation of these ideas alongside major chapters in the city's history.
BradleySmell

BradleySmell

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Dec 17, 2015
Description
From flowers and perfumes to urban sanitation and personal hygiene, smell—a sense that is simultaneously sublime and animalistic—has played a pivotal role in western culture and thought. Greek and Roman writers and thinkers lost no opportunity to connect the smells that bombarded their senses to the social, political and cultural status of the individuals and environments that they encountered: godly incense and burning sacrifices, seductive scents, aromatic cuisines, stinking bodies, pungent farmyards and festering back-streets.
Eidinow, Esther (2007)

Eidinow, Esther (2007)

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Oct 30, 2013
Description
This book sets question tablets from the oracle at Dodona side-by-side with curse tablets from across the Ancient Greek world and explores what these texts reveal about perceptions of and responses to the uncertain future, and the nature of risk in Greek society—for both individuals and institutions. It includes a catalogue of texts in both Greek and English.
Eidinow, Esther (2011)

Eidinow, Esther (2011)

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Oct 30, 2013
Description
Using approaches from cognitive anthropology, this book explores how ancient Greek concepts of fate, luck and fortune developed over time, and how they were manipulated in response to social and political events. Analysing the expression of these ideas across a number of ancient authors, this book also encourages us to examine current approaches to the uncertain future.
Eidinow, Esther (2012)

Eidinow, Esther (2012)

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Oct 30, 2013
Description
This reference work covers all aspects of the classical era in over 6,700 entries, written by a team of renowned classics scholars from all around the world. This edition is thoroughly revised and updated to incorporate the very latest research, developments, and bibliography, and covers two new focus areas (anthropology and reception).
Finglass, Patrick (2007)

Finglass, Patrick (2007)

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Mar 01, 2011
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Sophocles Electra. Cambridge University Press. This edition, the first full-scale commentary on any play of Sophocles since the nineteenth century, explores afresh long-standing controversies such as the moral status of the killing of Clytemnestra, while also investigating many subjects which have traditionally attracted less attention, such as the place of rhetoric within the drama, the use of typical scenes, and allusions to epinician poetry.
Finglass, Patrick (2011)

Finglass, Patrick (2011)

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Oct 05, 2011
Description
Cambridge University Press. Sophocles' Ajax describes the fall of a mighty warrior denied the honour which he believed was his due. This new edition of the play presents a text and critical apparatus which take full advantage of recent advances in our understanding of Sophoclean manuscripts and scholarship.
finglassajax-Cropped-130x130

finglassajax-Cropped-130x130

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Oct 06, 2011
Description
Cambridge University Press. Sophocles' Ajax describes the fall of a mighty warrior denied the honour which he believed was his due. This new edition of the play presents a text and critical apparatus which take full advantage of recent advances in our understanding of Sophoclean manuscripts and scholarship.
finglassstesichorusincontext

finglassstesichorusincontext

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Jun 05, 2015
FinglassStesichoruspoems

FinglassStesichoruspoems

Uploaded
Dec 11, 2014
fotheringhampromilone

fotheringhampromilone

Uploaded
Dec 19, 2013
Description
This innovative approach to Cicero's persuasive language analyses the style and structure of one of his important speeches in more detail than has ever been done before. It applies ideas from modern linguistics (sentential topic, lexical patterning, interactional discourse), and explores the possibilities and limitations of quantitative analysis, made easier by modern computing power, in the areas of syntax and vocabulary. The result is a reading of the Pro Milone as a unified text, whether aimed at persuading the jury to acquit Milo or at persuading a wider audience that Milo should have been acquitted. This reading not only contributes to our understanding of late republican discourse, but also suggests a new methodology for using the study of language and style to illuminate literary/historical aspects of texts.
Hodkinson, Stephen (2010)

Hodkinson, Stephen (2010)

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Mar 08, 2011
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Sparta - Comparative Approaches, Classical Press of WalesBoth in antiquity and in modern scholarship, classical Sparta has typically been viewed as an exceptional society, different in many respects from other Greek city-states.This view has recently come under challenge from revisionist historians, led by Stephen Hodkinson. This is the first book devoted explicitly to this lively historical controversy. Historians from Britain, Europe and the USA present different sides of the argument, using a variety of comparative approaches. The focus includes kingship and hegemonic structures, education and commensality, religious institutions and practice, helotage and ethnography.
Hodkinson, Stephen (2010)

Hodkinson, Stephen (2010)

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Mar 08, 2011
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Sparta the Body Politic, Classical Press of WalesThis is the 7th volume from the International Sparta Seminar. Chapters by distinguished scholars deal with the politics of Spartan nudity; the insecurity of Spartan kings and the social meaning of the prominence of animals in Lakonian vase-painting and in naming; what Lakonian vase-painting reveals about local consumerism; the "ghost of the Lakedaimonian state" and the position of Sparta's perioikoi; Ephorus' idealising view of Sparta; how Spartan women policed the behaviour of men; and how 20th-century intellectuals compared Sparta with Nazi Germany.
Kropp, Andreas (2013)

Kropp, Andreas (2013)

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Oct 30, 2013
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This book is an archaeological and art-historical study of the images and monuments of Roman 'client' kings in the Near East in the important transitional period from the downfall of the Seleucid empire to Rome's establishment of provincial administrations in the region. The study looks at royal portraits, tombs, palaces, coins, and temples of the six major players: the Kommagenian, Emesan, Ituraean, Nabataean, Hasmonaean, and Herodian dynasties. The images and monuments come in an endless variety of eclectic styles, shapes, and types - a result of cultural choices from an array of options. This study looks at monuments like the Khazneh at Petra or the Temple at Jerusalem as historical documents attesting ideological aspirations and skilfully constructed royal personas.
Liebeschuetz, Wolf (2011)

Liebeschuetz, Wolf (2011)

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Mar 08, 2011
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Ambrose and John Chrysostom: Clerics between Desert and Empire, Oxford University Press. J. H. W. G. Liebeschuetz compares the personalities and the respective careers of two of the greatest of the early Christian Fathers, Ambrose and John Chrysostom. While the statesmanlike Ambrose ended his life as a pillar of the Western establishment, Chrysostom, the outspoken idealist, died in exile. However, their views and ideals were remarakably similar: both bishops were concerned with the social role of the Church, both were determined opponents of what they called the Arian heresy, and each attracted a dedicated following among his urban congregation. This similarity, Liebeschuetz argues, was due not to the influence of one on the other, but was a consequence of their participation in a Christian culture which spanned the divide between the Eastern (later Byzantine) and Western parts of the Roman Empire. The monastic movement figures throughout the book as an important influence on both men and as perhaps the most dynamic development in the Christian culture of the fourth century.
Lorenz, Katharina (2008)

Lorenz, Katharina (2008)

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Mar 01, 2011
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Bilder machen Raume. Walter De Gruyter. In this analysis of mythological paintings in the houses of Pompeii the objective is to produce a model of the contextual relationships between viewers and objects, and of the use of myth as means of social communication in the early Roman Empire.
Lovatt, Helen (2013)

Lovatt, Helen (2013)

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Aug 07, 2013
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The epic genre has at its heart a fascination with the horror of viewing death. Epic heroes have active visual power, yet become objects, turned into monuments, watched by two main audiences: the gods above and the women on the sidelines. This stimulating, ambitious study investigates the theme of vision in Greek and Latin epic from Homer to Nonnus, bringing the edges of epic into dialogue with celebrated moments (the visual confrontation of Hector and Achilles, the failure of Turnus' gaze), revealing epic as massive assertion of authority and fractured representation. Helen Lovatt demonstrates the complexity of epic constructions of gender: from Apollonius' Medea toppling Talos with her eyes to Parthenopaeus as object of desire. She discusses mortals appropriating the divine gaze, prophets as both penetrative viewers and rape victims, explores the divine authority of epic ecphrasis, and exposes the way that heroic bodies are fragmented and fetishised.
Lovatt, Helen (2013)

Lovatt, Helen (2013)

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Aug 16, 2013
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This wide-ranging, interdisciplinary collection explores different ways of visualising Greek and Roman epic from Homer to Statius, in both ancient and modern culture. The book presents new perspectives on Homer, Virgil, Ovid, Lucan, Valerius Flaccus and Statius, and covers the re-working of epic matter in tragedy, opera, film, late antique speeches of praise, story-boarding, sculpture and wall-painting. The chapters use a variety of methods to address the relationship between narrative and visuality, exploring how and why epic has inspired artists, authors and directors and offering fresh visual interpretations of epic texts.
Malloch, Simon (2013)

Malloch, Simon (2013)

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Oct 30, 2013
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This edition of Annals 11, the first scholarly one in English in over a hundred years, contains a full introduction, a newly-edited Latin text with apparatus, and a comprehensive commentary that illuminates historical, historiographical, textual, linguistic, and literary issues that arise from the narrative. Funding towards completion was received from the AHRC.
Mossman, Judith (2010)

Mossman, Judith (2010)

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Mar 07, 2011
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Euripedes: Medea. Oxbow Books. Jason, in exile in Corinth, is marrying the king's daughter. It looks as though his problems are over, though it's hard on Medea, who has betrayed her family for him, followed him all the way from Colchis, killed for him, and borne him two sons. Euripides' Medea is a compelling study of love turned to hatred and a rejected woman's burning desire for revenge. Its central, shocking, act of infanticide comes as the climax of a psychological thriller in which Euripides' dramaturgical skills are shown at their finest and the audience's emotions are ruthlessly manipulated. Medea's conflicting urges and her dazzling rhetoric have exercised an enduring fascination over audiences and readers since the play was first performed in 431 BC. This edition examines a wide range of aspects of the play, including text, performance, interpretation, Euripides' sources, other lost plays about Medea and Euripides' portrayal of character and gender.
Ryan, Cressida  co ed (2010)

Ryan, Cressida co ed (2010)

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Mar 08, 2011
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Zero to Hero, Hero to Zero: in seach of the classical Hero, Cambridge Scholars PublishingCo ed with Lydia LangerwerfHercules is a hero; we were all brought up to appreciate the supposedly basic idea of the ancient hero. But what about him makes him a hero? This book aims to challenge some of the standard expectations as to what constitutes a hero, through considering the phenomenon of heroism from a range of viewpoints. In this book we invite you to walk around the monumental notions of the hero and of heroism and endeavour to reach out and touch them on all sides. The chapters in this volume testify to the difficulty in answering the question 'what is a hero?' and in attempting their answers engage with a variety of themes. They demonstrate not just the variety of qualities in which the protagonists of classical literature can be deemed heroic, but also the tendency of aspects of heroism to turn sour once identified. It seems that the moment we recognise heroic features we are forced to question them.
Sommerstein, Alan (2008)

Sommerstein, Alan (2008)

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Mar 08, 2011
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Aeschylus 1 Persians, Loeb Classical LibraryAeschylus (ca. 525?456 BCE), the dramatist who made Athenian tragedy one of the world's great art forms, witnessed the establishment of democracy at Athens and fought against the Persians at Marathon. He won the tragic prize at the City Dionysia thirteen times between 484 and 458, and in his later years was probably victorious almost every time he put on a production, though Sophocles beat him at least once.Of his total of about eighty plays, seven survive complete. The first volume of this new Loeb Classical Library edition offers fresh texts and translations by Alan Sommerstein.
Sommerstein, Alan (2009)

Sommerstein, Alan (2009)

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Mar 01, 2011
Description
Aeschylus: The Persians and Other Plays. Penguin. A translation, with introduction and notes, of three plays of Aeschylus - The Persians, Seven against Thebes, and The Suppliants - as well as Prometheus Bound, tradtionally attributed to him but perhaps in fact the work of his son Euphorion. Appended to each play is a section presenting what is known about the other plays that were produced together with it.
Sommerstein, Alan (2009)

Sommerstein, Alan (2009)

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Mar 01, 2011
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Talking About Laughter. Oxford University Press. This book brings together fourteen studies by Alan Sommerstein on Aristophanes and his fellow comic dramatists, some of which have not previously appeared in print. The studies cover almost all the major topics of Sommerstein's work.
Sommerstein, Alan (2010)

Sommerstein, Alan (2010)

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Mar 08, 2011
Description
Aeschylean Tragedy (2nd ed.) Duckworth Aeschylus was the dramatist who made Athenian tragedy one of the world's great art-forms. In this completely revised and updated edition of his book Alan H. Sommerstein, analysing the seven extant plays of the Aeschylean corpus (one of them probably in fact the work of another author) and utilising the knowledge we have of the seventy or more whose scripts have not survived, explores Aeschylus' poetic, dramatic, theatrical and musical techniques, his social, political and religious ideas, and the significance of his drama for our own day. Special attention is paid to the Oresteia trilogy, and the other surviving plays are viewed against the background of the four-play productions of which they formed part. There are chapters on Aeschylus' theatre, on his satyr-dramas, and on his dramatisations of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, and a detailed chapter-by-chapter guide to further reading. No knowledge of Greek is assumed, and all texts are quoted in translation.
Sommerstein, Alan (2010)

Sommerstein, Alan (2010)

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Mar 08, 2011
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The Tangled Ways of Zeus, Oxford University PressThis book brings together nineteen studies by Alan Sommerstein on ancient Athenian drama, especially tragedy; five of these have not previously appeared in print, and almost all the others were first published (between 1992 and 2006) in out-of-the-way journals, collections or conference volumes. These appear here as originally written, but are accompanied by updating addenda. Though they cover a wide range of topics – from the presentation of violence in drama to the socialization of the adolescent male, from the authenticity of play titles to the significance of one character calling another "dearest" – most of them focus on four or five themes: the dramatists' exploitation and modification of myth; how much their audiences could know or guess in advance about the content of a play; connected suites of plays that were produced together (trilogies and tetralogies); the information that can be gleaned from our fragmentary evidence about plays that have not survived; and some of the multifarious connections between Athenian tragic drama and Athenian society, including the socioeconomic composition of audiences, the relationship between Aeschylus' Oresteia and the politics of its day, and evidence supporting the tradition that Aeschylus desired to be commemorated on his tomb not as a poet but as a soldier. All are informed by the conviction that "the study of ancient, or any other, literature is a branch of history".
sommersteinmenanderincontexts

sommersteinmenanderincontexts

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Sep 17, 2015
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The comedies of the Athenian dramatist Menander (c. 342-291 BC) and his contemporaries were the ultimate source of a Western tradition of light drama that has continued to the present. Yet for over a millennium, Menander's own plays were thought to have been completely lost. Thanks to a long and continuing series of papyrus discoveries, Menander has now been able to take his place among the major surviving ancient Greek dramatists alongside Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides and Aristophanes.
SommersteinMenanderSamia

SommersteinMenanderSamia

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Dec 17, 2015
Description
For eight centuries after his death Menander was a highly popular poet in the Greek-speaking world, however, it is only since 1844 that some of the actual texts of his plays have been rediscovered, mostly in Egyptian papyri. Two of these have given us four-fifths of the script of Samia (The Woman from Samos), a play of deception and misunderstanding in which a marriage that everyone wants almost fails to happen, two women and a baby are almost ruined, and a loving father almost loses his only son – but somehow everything ends happily after all! This is the first full-scale edition with English commentary.

Department of Classics

University of Nottingham
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