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Kaye Haw

Associate Professor,

Contact

  • workRoom C39 Dearing
    Jubilee Campus
    Wollaton Road
    Nottingham
    NG8 1BB
    UK
  • work0115 951 4510
  • fax0115 846 6600

Biography

Dr Kaye Haw is an Associate Professor at the University of Nottingham and is a member of the Centre for Research in Higher Adult & Vocational Education (HAVE). Kaye has spent her career working on research with difficult and hard to reach groups on sensitive issues. Her career has been driven by a methodological interest in obtaining access to groups that have been traditionally silenced and through a participatory research process get their 'voices' articulated and heard in arenas where this would not normally be the case. In terms of subject area she is particularly interested in a range of educational and social issues that have affected or affect members of urban communities. Her earliest research concentrated on feminisms and issues of identity particularly within Asian communities. Initially these were British Muslim communities over sensitive issues such as faith based schools and European Muslim communities concerning the problem of domestic violence in these communities. Her work with different Muslim communities in inner city areas has led her to work in the UK, Europe, USA and Pakistan.

Expertise Summary

She has worked with young people and their involvement in a spectrum of risk behaviours that include their exclusion from school to their involvement in criminal activities and in consequence the criminal justice system. This research is mainly based in socio-economically deprived locations and with Black and Asian communities. The development of innovative research approaches that allow for the articulation of silenced voices and participation in the research process has been a priority because of the need to take into account different epistemological standpoints, equity, power and dynamic models of identity. These key methodological challenges have necessitated an innovative and varied approach to data collection in a range of research projects that have concerned exclusion from school, pupil mobility, a project for the European year against racism and strip search procedures in British prisons and Young Offenders Institutions. The originality of these very different research projects concerns their subject matter but more importantly a mixed methods approach and involvement of academic and community researchers with implications for the future of participatory educational and social science research. The innovativeness of her research lies in its adaptation of the work of visual ethnographers and anthropologists combined with an approach exploring group self-representation, and collective and individual identity using a series of projective tasks, involving video to trigger discussion. This approach developed over several years of research with inner city communities using video as a professional development and community consultation tool has now attracted the attention of the ESRC for the second time. This new two-year research project is a national review of participatory research projects that set out to use video and involve the voice of young people. It is particularly timely because of the massive expansion in the use of video within participatory research across the social sciences in an area where practice is outstripping the existing and somewhat fragmented methodological literature. Its aim is to produce materials that set out the key methodological and ethical issues facing these projects and how they can be addressed in practice. Additionally a further grant from the AHRC/ESRC has been awarded to return to her PhD research working with Muslim communities around issues of identity and multiculturalism.

Research Summary

The development of research approaches that allow for the articulation of silenced voices and participation in the research process has necessitated an innovative and varied approach to data… read more

Recent Publications

Kaye is a member of the Centre for Research in Higher, Adult and Vocational Education. Her research supervision areas include:

  • social justice issues concerning the interaction of 'race' and gender with specific reference to the experience of Muslim girls and women in school and the workplace
  • poststructuralism and feminist theory
  • issues of exclusion and excluded groups with respect to urban regeneration initiatives and schooling
  • visual methodologies

Research proposals: please email Kaye if you would like to discuss the appropriateness of your research topic. See also: School of Education research supervision areas.

Current Research

The development of research approaches that allow for the articulation of silenced voices and participation in the research process has necessitated an innovative and varied approach to data collection in subsequent research projects that have concerned exclusion from school, pupil mobility, a project for the European year against racism and perceptions of strip search procedures in British prisons and Young Offenders Institutions. She is currently working with young people and their involvement in a spectrum of risk behaviours through their involvement in criminal activities and in consequence the criminal justice system. This research is mainly based in socio-economically deprived locations and with Black and Asian communities and was part of an ESRC Network 'Pathways Into and Out of Crime: Risk, Resilience and Diversity'. The originality of these very different research projects concerns their subject matter but more importantly a mixed methods approach using video and the involvement of an eclectic mix of academic and community researchers. This is an innovative adaptation of the work of visual ethnographers and anthropologists combined with an approach exploring group self-representation, and collective and individual identity using a series of projective tasks, involving video to trigger discussion that has now attracted the attention of the ESRC for the second time on a two-year research project that is a national review of participatory research projects using video and 'voice'. Its aim is to produce materials that set out the key methodological and ethical issues facing these projects and how they can be addressed in practice. Running alongside this project is another project funded by the AHRC Religion and Society Programme that is a return to her doctoral work researching issues of identities, multiculturalism and citizenship.

New Research Project

Video as a means of creating dialogue within the participatory research process (Funders ESRC £105,473. 2007-2009)

From Hijab to Jilbab (Funders AHRC/ESRC £90,000 2007-2008)

Past Research

Recent Research Projects

Risk and Resilience in Urban Black and Asian Culture- ESRC Network Risk, Resilience and Diversity (Funders: ESRC: £198,000. 2001-2005)

Examining Housing Turnover and Pupil Mobility. (Funders: Nottingham City Council: £16,000. 2002-2003)

Research into Perceptions Around Strip Searching Procedures (Funders: The Home Office £50,000-£60,000 June 2002-2003)

Anti-racist Manual for Schools (Funders: URBAN Area Partnership Council from ERDF: £34,500. 1999-2000)

Junior Gateway (Funders: Guideline Careers: £5,000. September 1999-March 2000)

Youth Justice Board - Evaluation of Mentoring Programmes (Funders: Youth Justice Board: £6,750. 2000-2002)

'Voices' From Behind the Veil: Muslim Women Across Europe (Funders: The European Commission, DGX: £90,000. December 2001 -May 2002

Future Research

I have built up extensive fieldwork experience in working cross culturally with a range of 'hard to reach groups' locally, nationally and internationally. The impact of this work has been in the areas of education and youth policy concerning the issue of the 'voice' of young people (Haw, 1996, 1998 and forthcoming). The last five years have seen major methodological advances in two areas of my work, that of 'voice' and young people and the use of multi-media case studies in working with silenced groups. More recently I have developed this case study work in a project that uses on-line discussion and the establishment of web pages to maintain confidentiality and anonymity for Muslim women across Europe as they discuss issues of domestic violence. These methodological advances have underpinned my recent successful research proposals to carry out projects that use a diversity of new technology to produce multi-media case studies aimed at bridging the gaps between, 'hard to reach' groups of young people, researchers and practitioners so that the materials produced will meaningfully impact on practitioners and policy makers alike.

I have several research projects in development that build on previous work as well as new areas. I am currently putting together a bid for Leverhulme that builds on the AHRC project looking at notions of professional identity and how this links with notions of religious identity linked to wider social constructions of Islam and being Muslim. My work with young people 'at risk' in the ESRC Priority Network 'Pathways Into and Out of Crime: Risk Resilience and Diversity' has led me to be invited to be part of another international Network on disaffected youth, gangs and violence. We are currently looking for funding for this network.

My existing interest in issues of inclusion and those 'at risk' has led me to identifying several new areas of work. Through my teaching on the research methods course and the interests of one of my current PhD students I have been approached to be part of a team looking at the experiences of Polish migrants in British schools. A bid has been written and is currently being considered by the relevant funding body in Poland. In terms of community involvement I am increasingly interested in the role of single and non-resident fathers in the education of their children. The second area of new work is to look at issues currently faced by contract researchers. I am collaborating with colleagues at Loughborough University on this.

  • HAW, K. and HADFIELD, M., 2011. Video in social science research: functions and forms Routledge.
  • HAW, K., 2011. The 'changing same' of an' in-between' generation: negotiating identities through space, place and time Discourse: Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education. 32(4), 565-579
  • HAW, K., 2011. Being Muslim: Education and identities in late modern multicultural societies Discourse: Studies in the cultural politics of education. 32(4), 475-479
  • HAW, K., 2010. Being, becoming and belonging: young Muslim women in contemporary Britain Journal of Intercultural Studies. 31(4), 345-361
  • HAW, K., 2008. 'Voice' and video: seen, heard and listened to?. In: THOMSON, P., ed., Doing visual research with children and young people Routledge. 192-207
  • HAW, K.F., 2006. Urbanfields: An Everyday Story,DVD, Urban Programes Research Group
  • HAW, K., 2005. 'Voice' in Youth Activism. In: SHERROD, L.R., FLANAGAN, C.A., KASSIMIR, R. and SYVERTSEN, A.K., eds., Youth Activism: An International Encyclopaedia 2. Westport, CT: Greenwood Publishing. 671-676
  • HAW, K.F. and HADFIELD, M.P., 2004. Research into strip search perceptions
  • HAW, K.F., 2003. Web Page; Voices From Behind The Veil e-mail discussion site
  • HAW, K.F., 2002. Voices From Behind the Veil: Muslim Women Across Europe European Commission, Brussels, Belgium.
  • HADFIELD, M. and HAW, K., 2001. 'Voice', young people and action research Educational Action Research. 9(3), 485-502
  • HAW, K.F. and HADFIELD, M.P., 2001. Anti Racist Manual, report for URBAN Area Partnership Council from ERDF (0853581029)
  • HAW, K., 2000. Border Tensions: Skirmishes Around the Term Exclusion. In: Combining Social Exclusion Through Education 157-174
  • HAW, K.F., 1999. Les establissements pour fille muselmanes en Grand Bretagne dans des communities conistees et en conflits. In: Actes du Collque tolerance et Inter culteralite en Europe Singh Publications. 100-107
  • HAW, K.F., 1998. Educating Muslim Girls: Shifting Discourses Open University Press, Buckingham.
  • HAW, K., 1998. Educational Needs of Muslim Children in Britain: Accommodation or Neglect?. In: Muslim European Youth: Reproducing ethnicity, religion, culture Ashgate Publishing Group, Aldershot & London. 193-215
  • HAW, K. F., Charlie Why Ya Hideing’: The role of Myth and Emotions in the lives of Young People Living in a High Crime Area. In: J.F SCHOSTAK AND J.R. SCHOSTAK, ed., Researching Violence, Democracy and the Rights of Young People: NA 1st ed. Routledge. (In Press.)

School of Education

Jubilee Campus
Wollaton Road
Nottingham, NG8 1BB

telephone: +44 (0) 115 951 4543
fax: +44 (0) 115 846 6600
email: EducationEnquiries@nottingham.ac.uk