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tbcCase Studies

When starting with e-learning it is beneficial to get an idea of what actually happens when developing e-learning. In this part of el@n we have several case studies (and we are always looking for new items and content, especially case studies written by staff) to help you see what happens when software is developed. These case studies are examples of recent developments of e-learning, written by the authors themselves.

tbcNumbers for Nurses

Numbers for nurses was a joint development between the School of Nursing and the IS learning team. The project has had 2 years of development; with parts of the project being made available at times during this period. This piece of e-learning is available to all nurses spread over our nursing sites. You can read the case study here.

tbcThe SPLINT CETL

SPLINT (SPatial Literacy IN Teaching) is a CETL (Centres for Excellence in Teaching and Learning) based at 3 Universities in the UK (of which Nottingham is one). All CETLs are HEFCE funded and are designed to recognise and reward excellent teaching but to also foster and encourage the further development and eventual propagation of the work developed. You can read the case study here.

tbcE-Assessment at the Vet School

QMP - Question Mark Perception is a piece of software the University has bought to help create online exams. The Vet School is one of the schools where this approach has been adopted, and this case study covers their experience in using this technology. You can read the case study here.

tbcSupporting distance learners on Graduate School courses

The Graduate School Centre and Faculty-based Graduate Centres offer dedicated provision for postgraduates. This case study discusses methods and approaches to help geographically distant and often isolated students collaborate and work with each other. You can read the case study here.

tbcE-Pioneers in the school of Education

The ePioneers Initiative was set up by the School of Education to support staff with e-learning through 'quick-gain' projects using a mentoring approach. It has now been developed to provide wider support for e-learning across the University. You can read the case study here.

The School of Education & SEDU have developed a course for staff (support and academic) who wish to further develop e-learning in their own Schools. Please go to the following link for further details:

Course information

tbcCultural exchange by Video Conferencing

Developed by Oranna Speicher and Maryse Wright from the Language Centre, the following podcast and presentation where presented at the e-learning seminar in January 2008. There is a blog on Community, where you can discuss these ideas.

tbcEnchancing course delivery

Developed by Christina Lee in the School of English, the following podcast was presented at the e-learning seminar in January 2008. The developer of the images for this course, Nuno Jorge has made available the following information on the design process as well. There is a blog on Community, where you can discuss these ideas.

tbcRLO developlment using Xerte Templates

Developed by Ben Di Mambro from the School of Community Health Sciences and Julian Tenney from IS Learning, the following podcast and presentation where presented by Ben at the e-learning seminar in January 2008. There is a blog on Community, where you can discuss these ideas.

tbcRapidly creating e-learning using toolkits

The One Stop Language Shop was developed by Oranna Speicher of the School of Modern Languages and Cultures and Thomas Koller from IS Learning. Using a suite of tailored software developed by IS Learning and staff in the school, lecturers are able to now easily create rich interactive e-learning applications. You can read the case study here.

tbcUsing Turnitin to detect plagiarism

Heather Roberts of the School of Community Health Sciences discussed the use of plagiarism detection software turnitin in the following podcast and presentation, which where presented at the e-learning seminar in January 2008. There is a blog on Community, where you can discuss these ideas.

tbcUsing online discussions

Svetlana Clark of the School of Modern Languages and Cultures discussed the use of WebCT's online discussion fora in the following podcast and presentation, which where presented at the e-learning seminar in January 2008. There is a blog on Community, where you can discuss these ideas.

tbcTeaching courses across International campuses

At the May 2008 e-learning community, Matthew Boyd from the School of Pharmacy and Stephen Hibberd from the School of Mathematics both delivered presentations on teaching courses across International campuses. You can listen to Matthew's presentation (and see the powerpoint) or Stephen's presentation (and see the powerpoint) by clicking on the relevant links.

tbcUsing podcasting : Initial experiences

At the June 2008 e-learning community, Wyn Morgan from the School of Economics delivered a presentation on his initial experiences of podcasting. You can listen to Wyn's presentation (and see the powerpoint) by clicking on the relevant links.

tbcSupporting distance learners with web 2.0 tools

At the June 2008 e-learning community, Elaine Arici and Jacqueline Stevenson from the School of Education delivered a presentation on their use of the University's social networking site, Community @ Nottingham with their distnace learners. You can listen to Elaine and Jacqueline's presentation (and see the powerpoint) by clicking on the relevant links.

tbcWiki technology : The WikiVet in the Vet School

At the June 2008 e-learning community, Richard Hammond from the Vet School delivered a presentation on the Vet Schools use of Wiki technology with their students, and with students from other organisations. You can listen to Richard's presentation (and see the powerpoint) by clicking on the relevant links. There is also an ALT case study of a student's experience of Wikivet available.

tbcInternational week - International teaching and learning

In the recent International education week, Wyn Morgan, Director of Teaching and Learning, and Christopher Pressler, Director of Research and Learning Resources gave the following presentation.

tbcStatistics - colloborating and developing using Xerte Online Toolkits

At the November 2008 E-learning seminar, Richard Field of the School of Geography gave a presentation on his use of Xerte Online Toolkits. You can watch his presentation (with thanks to Ian Pearshouse and the LSRI for the use of their recording system) mms://wirksworthii.nottingham.ac.uk/webcast/elearning/051108pt1.wmv). John Horton from Information Services worked with Richard Field, and his case study is also available.

tbcNumerical calculations - developing a Xerte Online Toolkits template

John Horton from Information Services worked with staff from the School of Chemical Engineering to develop a new Xerte Online Template, and his case study is also available. To see the end result of the template, please see this example.

tbcUsing the SMS service

At April's e-learning community a presentation was made on the University's text messaging service and its possible use in education. You can watch this presentation here.

tbcInteractive Whiteboards

Matt Boyd from the School of Pharmacy gave the following presentation at April's e-learning community on his use of interactive whiteboards.

tbcThe use of video

At March's e-learning community a series of presentation where made on the use of video by various schools. You can watch a here recording of the entire community here. There also these videos from February's elearning community - Video 1,Video 2 and Video 3.

tbcCurriculum change

This CETL 'enhancement' project was designed to build upon recognised excellence as established in a UK Quality Assurance Agency 'Subject Review' of the School of History in 2003. This praised the 'holistic' approach to student transition and progression to independent, active learning in the subject as a 'model for the sector'. The CETL project involved developing the existing year 1 core programme 'Learning History' to build upon its potential for integrative learning and to integrate the programme more directly into the culture of the School and the practice of teaching, through a change involving School-wide academic staff engagement. This work was carried out by Doctor Alan Booth.
See the case study

tbcUsing educational theory

Many Education students can be taking academic courses at an early stage of their professional career. So they may have limited experience of educational practice. Yet often, they will have a great interest in relating theory to such practice. Moreover, some Education students may be from overseas and so may have a particular appetite for learning about practicalities of the UK system. The first aim of this project is to explore forms of encounter that help Education students integrate theory with practice. The second aim is to find a way of documenting these encounters such that the experience of each individual student can be shared with others and itself become a platform for reflection and debate. Accordingly, we are convening a wide variety of encounters in which students can meet with practitioners or get direct awareness of what they do through site visits. We are also requiring students to document these encounters through an electronic portfolio. Through a spiralling process of experience, documentation and commentary we hope to create a lasting record of exchanges at the theory/practice interface. It is expected that such a record will resource future students to approach their own activities at this interface in a more enlightened manner. This work was carried out by Dr Charles Crook.
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tbcEportfolios

This innovative project connects academic study, reflective self-awareness, experiential learning and professional development through the construction of an ePortfolio in the context of the Postgraduate Certificate in Teaching English for Academic Purposes (PGCTEAP). This wholly integrative approach enables students on the distance learning PGCTEAP to compile evidence during the course of learning and development in the area of TEAP. Evidence may take the form of lesson plans, teaching materials, and samples of self-reflection on teaching practices. The completed ePortfolio provides a valuable resource for students to present to future employers both in the UK and abroad. This work was carried out by Dr Martha Jones.
See the case study

tbcBuilding a 3D art gallery

'Curata' emerged as a project through the development of a new Masters degree pathway, called 'Modern Art, Criticism and Display' in the Department of Art History at the University of Nottingham. The new pathway builds on departmental expertise and aims to introduce postgraduate students to issues emerging from the study of modern and contemporary modes of gallery/museum display and associated themes, such as curating, art criticism and the development of display strategies across the 20th and 21st centuries. Assessment for the pathway takes the form of an exhibition project. Students are encouraged to work through the processes involved with curating a show: pitching a speculative idea for a show in a class presentation, developing this idea by finalising works for the exhibition, arranging these works in a gallery space, and then writing a catalogue essay which explores the rationale informing the exhibition. 'Curata' 3D gallery software provides a technological solution to a practical problem: namely, how to realise, in concrete terms, the exhibition project when there exists no access to a physical gallery space (never mind securing the actual works of art themselves). The development of 'Curata' enables students to work in virtual spaces and lift their designs off the page and into realistically rendered 3-dimensional virtual galleries. This work was carried out by Dr Mark Rawlinson.
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tbcIntegrative learning groups

Integrative Learning Groups are an innovative and student-centred initiative using student-led small groups, designed to support trainee social work students in learning to make connections between the theoretical knowledge and skills training acquired during the first semester of their social work qualifying programme, and the opportunities for practical development during the social work practice learning opportunity. The project achieves this through the development of a Problem-Based Learning approach to the taught aspects of the course. This encourages students to approach knowledge and skills in ways which simulate how they will need to utilise these in addressing problems as practitioners. Our findings show that they engage with the kind of problems that are encountered in practice while developing their capacity for self learning and self assessment, which are key competencies in social work practice. This work was carried out by Professor Kate Wilson.
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tbcDeveloping a Reusable learning object

The project investigated the effectiveness of 'student-centred' learning using a reusable learning object (RLO). RLOs are popular within the Sciences and Medicine, but are used less frequently within the Humanities. Even so, it seemed that philosophy students grappling with the core subject of philosophical logic would find them beneficial; and that, as such, they would be a good mechanism for investigating a selection of philosophy students' approaches to learning. The results indicate that the students took well to driving their own learning, and they appreciated the independence and the flexibility that the logic RLO offered. This work was carried out by Dr Andy Fisher.
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tbcKnowledge connections

This project was designed to allow students on the MA Global Citizenship, Identity & Human Rights to undertake internships in Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) that would help them to make connections between the knowledge and skills they acquire in core modules, especially the module 'Civil Society: the role of NGOs', and the real world problems and dilemmas faced by those who work in the NGO sector. In so doing, it aimed to help students to prepare both for employment in that sector and for citizenship more generally; to allow them to integrate their academic study of abstract theories of civil society, globalisation, identity, citizenship and human rights with personal experience and understanding of the ways in which NGOs approach these issues in the real world; and to encourage students' personal development through active engagement with the problems with which NGOs grapple. This work was carried out by Professor Julia O'Connell Davidson.
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tbcInside employment

Inside Employment is an innovative and student-centred initiative using mixed-discipline teams, and the experience of networking and work-shadowing. Students investigate a financial career path, disseminate their findings at a student-led careers event and reflect on their experiences in a skills development audit. The integrative dimensions of this project break down the University/workplace divide and encourage students to operate as intentional learners who can relate learning activities with their own needs, interests and skills. This involves reflecting to make connections, personally matching self to opportunity and developing awareness of their own transferable skills.
Phase 2
This project was the second stage of the Inside Employment initiative. Inside Employment is an innovative and student-centred initiative using mixed-discipline teams, and the experience of networking and work-shadowing. In this stage of the project, students investigate a Not for Profit career path, disseminate their findings at a student-led careers event and reflect on their experiences in a skills development audit. The integrative dimensions of this project break down the University/workplace divide and encourage students to operate as intentional learners who can relate learning activities with their own needs, interests and skills. This involves reflecting to make connections, personally matching self to opportunity and developing awareness of their own transferable skills.This work was carried out by Debra Henson.
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tbcLecture response systems

This project investigated the incorporation and evaluation of the use of Keepad system (KS) personal response units in promoting pharmacology understanding in non-medical prescribing (NMP) students. Keepads provide students with instant formative feedback and allow the lecturer to gauge student learning and progress. The results indicate 100% of students enjoyed using the KS and felt it promoted their understanding of key concepts; 92% stated that it helped identify their learning needs and 87% agreed that the technology was useful in promoting integration of concepts. Qualitative feedback indicated that students found this a useful tool to identify their own learning needs, aid with exam preparation and revision and reduced the associated anxiety. This work was carried out by Dr Joanne Lymn & Dr Alison Mostyn.
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tbcPublic engagement

Public engagement provides the opportunity for two bodies or organisations to work together combining expertise and bringing benefit to both parties. Bring together a group of engineering and science students, a common theme and a family of schools and you have a public engagement opportunity, but this project takes it one step further. This case study explores how the planning, piloting and delivery of a public engagement event provides an excellent platform for the university students responsible for the event to develop good communication skills, their own learning, and the ability to teach others. This work was carried out by Janice Yelland-Sutcliffe.
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tbcUsing video for Reflective Practice Learning to Facilitate Professional Socialisation

At the November 2009 e-learning community, Gemma Stacey presented on her use of video for helping nurses adjust to the professional environment they face after graduation. You can see her powerpoint presentation, and watch the video of her presentation. Two video examples of the content produced during this project where also shown during this presentation. These videos contain content that some people may find distressing - Susanna's story / Rachel's story.

tbcPublishing student research

At the November 2009 e-learning community, Martin Luck gave a presentation on BURN (Biosciences Undergraduate Research at Nottingham), which is part of an intiative to get student research more widely published. You can see the powerpoint presentation and the video of the presentation.

tbcStudents using video

Recorded at the UoN e-Learning Community 3rd Feb 2010. This presentation concerns an activity led by student interns, who were working for the Visual Learning Lab (VLL), which is a national Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning (CETL) based at the University of Nottingham. The activity involved gathering views from students around the University about their experiences of teaching and learning with particular reference to the use of visualisation in such learning activities. The outcome was a provocative video, produced by the VLL student interns, summarising the views and opinions of their fellow students. The presentation included a viewing of the video, which is both humorous and powerful in terms of the messages it conveys about learning and teaching in higher education. Watch this presentation.

tbcThe BERLIN project and OER

Recorded at the UoN e-Learning Community 3rd Feb 2010. Steve Stapleton (Open Learning Officer) provides an update on the BERLiN project, which aims to progress the vision of sustainable OERs by making a significant amount of existing learning resources freely available online. As part of an institution-wide strategy for engaging with new technologies in innovative and effective ways, there are a number of features of the teaching and learning landscape at Nottingham that lend themselves to helping deliver this vision for OERs. In addition, Nottingham's international campuses in China and Malaysia are key strategic drivers for sharing learning resources, fostering use and reuse as well as encouraging mobility. For more info see: http://unow.nottingham.ac.uk. Watch this presentation

tbcDeveloping CAL with Xerte Online Toolkits

The Medical School had a number of Anatomy CAL packages, created in Authorware over a number of years. Due to their age and format they were not easy to update or support but they did contain relevant and useful content. There was a requirement for the packages to be reviewed and where appropriate new versions created in a format that would be easy to update and easy for students to access. A Teaching and Learning funded project ran for 6 months in the first half of 2010 to address this. An overview (PDF) of this work is available.

tbcMore Case Studies

We are keen to hear from anyone (please email us if you would like to contribute to this part of the site.

You can also find more case studies on e-learning at PESL (Promoting Enhanced Student Learning).

tbc Don't forget

Look for help in the jargon buster if you're not sure what a term means.

tbc Useful links

For information on online courses or distance learning please click here

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