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Danielle Sinclair

PhD Student, Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences

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Biography

I am in the second year (2013-2014) of a full time PhD studentship within the School of Medicine and Health Sciences and Education

I have worked in the field of mental health and community work since graduating with a First class honours degree in Counselling and Therapeutic Studies from Leeds Metropolitan University in 2004. I specialise in working with young people in both the statutory and voluntary sector. I am also a qualified counsellor and has many years experience designing and delivering training in a variety of settings. This training has included designing BACP (British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy) CPD Endorsed Training in Working with People Affected by Eating Disorders, Mental Health Awareness Training and Body Image and Self Esteem sessions in schools.

Expertise Summary

First Class BSc Honours Degree in Counselling and Therapeutic Studies

Level 4 Diploma in Therapeutic Counselling

Areas of expertise: counselling psychology and counselling skills, eating difficulties and disorders, body image and self-esteem, Personality Disorders, self-harm and suicidal thoughts, working with young people

Funded by University of Nottingham

Teaching Summary

Areas of expertise: counselling psychology and counselling skills, eating difficulties and disorders, body image and self-esteem, Personality Disorders, self-harm and suicidal thoughts, working with… read more

Research Summary

An examination of young men's embodiment of a healthy masculinity.

Background: The World Health Organisation (2010) claims that we are in the midst of a global obesity 'epidemic'. This dominant obesity discourse privileges the idea that body weight is a primary determinant of 'health'. Little is known about the possible impacts this discourse may have on young people's own understandings of a healthy body or indeed the potential anxieties this may produce for young people's own body image. Whilst the psychosocial context of body image have been found to differ significantly by gender, much less research exists with regards to the particular effects of this on young people and their embodiment of healthy masculinity.

Body pedagogies are intimately connected to obesity discourse and its translation into education policy and teaching practice. This study seeks to better understand the impact of body pedagogies on young men and specifically, to explore how obesity discourse may shape young people's understandings of the relationship between body and health.

Methods: This study will utilise a qualitative interview based design. Data collection methods will include focus groups and classroom observations with young men aged 13-15 years. Participants will be recruited via purposive sampling within a secondary school setting in the UK. Data analysis will be conducted within the critical tradition with a focus on themes related to the dominant obesity discourse.

Implications: By understanding how young people engage with body pedagogies in educational settings, it is anticipated that findings from this work will help inform the translation of education policy into teaching practice by highlighting the potential impact on the way in which young men construct healthy, masculine bodies.

My supervisors are Professor Pat Thomson and Dr Grace Spencer

Projected thesis completion date - 2015

Areas of expertise: counselling psychology and counselling skills, eating difficulties and disorders, body image and self-esteem, Personality Disorders, self-harm and suicidal thoughts, working with young people

School of Health Sciences

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