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Emily Knox

Research Fellow, Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences

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Biography

Emily gained an undergraduate degree in Sport and Exercise Sciences from the University of Bath in 2011. She then completed a PhD in Behavioural Medicine which focused on the motivational implications of messages promoting increases in physical activity and reductions in sedentary behaviour in government guidelines and mass media campaigns aimed at adults. Prior to beginning her present role as Research Fellow in the School of Health Sciences at the University of Nottingham in August 2016, Emily worked for two years as a Research Associate at Loughborough University. During this time she worked in project evaluation within the British Heart Foundation National Centre for Physical Activity and Health on numerous regional and national health interventions and on a schools based project seeking to equip teachers to develop the psychological skills of their pupils.

Expertise Summary

Emily's main areas of expertise relate to the promotion of health-related information such as physical activity guidelines and the promotion of physical activity through educational and motivational campaigns to a range of audiences including children, young people and adults.

Research Summary

Emily is currently working on project SKIP which stands for Supporting Kids with Diabetes in Physical Activity. The project tests the feasibility of an online package to assist 9-12 year old patients… read more

Recent Publications

Current Research

Emily is currently working on project SKIP which stands for Supporting Kids with Diabetes in Physical Activity. The project tests the feasibility of an online package to assist 9-12 year old patients with Type 1 Diabetes in managing their condition and encouraging them to become more active. The project is intended to increase communication between the young patient and their health care practitioner and motivate them to increase their physical activity without a concomitant increase in adverse events such as hypoglycaemia or hyperglycaemia relating to diabetes.

Past Research

Previous research has focused on examining the motivational implications of physical activity guidelines in adults and the development of physical activity recommendations. Other previous research areas include the evaluation of large-scale regional and national interventions to improve the health behaviours or inactive adults, office-based workers and disadvantaged adolescent females. Most recently, research interests have focused on the psychological health of British, Spanish and Chilean children and adolescents. This has included examining the effects of physical activity and nutritional interventions on young people's quality of life and developing training packages for primary and secondary school teachers to support the psychological development of young people during the primary-secondary transition.

School of Health Sciences

B Floor, South Block Link
Queen's Medical Centre
Nottingham, NG7 2HA

telephone: +44 (0)115 823 0850
email: shs-enquiries@nottingham.ac.uk