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Elena Abrusci

PhD Student, Faculty of Social Sciences

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Biography

Elena Abrusci is a PhD Student at the School of Law of the University of Nottingham. She holds a BA in Political Science and International Relations from the University of Pisa (First, 110/110 cum laude) and a Master in International Relations from the University of Florence (Distinction, 110/110 cum laude). Elena also got an Advanced Diploma in Political Science from the Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna in Pisa (100/100 cum laude), where she was awarded a 5 years national scholarship. Elena has been a visiting student at the Paris School of International Affairs (Sciences Po-Paris, France), at the Peking University in China and the University of Sao Paolo, Brazil.

She worked as an intern, in 2011, in the Human Rights Office at the Italian Representation to the United Nations in Geneva (Switzerland) and, in 2012, for the Human Rights Commission of Sierra Leone in Freetown. Elena has also undertaken several training programsfor civilian personnels in peacekeeping and peacebuilding missions and she holds a HEAT Certificate.

Elena is supervised by Professor Sandesh Sivakumaran and Dr. Marko Milanovic. Her research is funded by the Vice-Chancellor Scholarship for Research Excellence of the University of Nottingham and by the Ermenegildo Zegna Founder's Scholarship.

Teaching Summary

Elena is a teaching assistant in European Convention of Human Rights.

She previously taught "Introduction to Comparative Politics" at the School of Politics and International Relations, University of Nottingham.

Research Summary

Elena's research focuses on the issue of convergence and judicial fragmentation within International Human Rights Law. The proliferation of regional and international human rights instruments and… read more

Recent Publications

03/06/2016 - Elena presented a paper entitled "Universality of Human Rights but different judicial protection: the issue of Indigenous Land Rights before Regional Human Rights Courts" at the LINK16-Postgraduate Research Conference at the University of Nottingham

14-15/06/2016 - Elena presented a paper entitled "Does Judicial Fragmentation Mean Crisis for International Human Rights Law?" at the Inaugural Postgraduate Conference in International Law and Human Rights "International Law and Human Rights in Crisis?" at the University of Liverpool

06/07/2016 - Elena presented a paper entitled "Indigenous Property Rights before Regional Human Rights Courts: causes and consequences of Judicial Fragmentation" at the HRC Postgraduate Human Rights Research Conference at the University of Essex

29-30/09/2016 - Elena presented a paper entitled "A tale of convergence? Sexual orientation issues in the case-law of regional human rights bodies and UN HRC" at the INTRAlaw Human Rights Colloquium "Interaction between human rights: 50 years after the Covenants" organised by the Department of Law of Aarhus University, Denmark

3/05/2017- Elena presented a paper entitled " Inside human rights adjudication: The impact of the educational and work background of judges and members of human rights bodies on judicial convergence and fragmentation" at the 26th Annual SLS/BIICL Workshop on Theory in International Law: 'Inside the mind of international decision-makers', London

15/05/2017 - Elena presented a paper entitled "A good fragmentation? Assessing the positive aspects of judicial fragmentation caused by the Inter-American Court of Human Rights" at the Workshop on "The role of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights: jurisprudential advances and new responses", organised by the Norwegian Centre for Human Rights, University of Oslo.

Current Research

Elena's research focuses on the issue of convergence and judicial fragmentation within International Human Rights Law. The proliferation of regional and international human rights instruments and bodies, the lack of a clear hierarchy among sources and bodies and the wide margin of interpretation left to judicial and quasi-judicial bodies contribute to establish a fertile ground for the arising of contrasting judgments from the adjudicatory bodies, thus determining judicial fragmentation. The aim of Elena's thesis is to assess the current extent of the phenomenon of judicial fragmentation in the case-law of the three main regional human rights bodies (the European Court of Human Rights, the Inter-American Court of Human Rights and the African Court -and Commission- of Human and People's Rights) and of the UN Human Rights Committee. Moreover, through the additional analysis of previous phenomenon of fragmentation now fully solved, Elena's research attempts to identify the factors and elements that cause judicial fragmentation or, otherwise, judicial convergence. This analysis is not limited to the legal sphere, thus identifying also extra-judicial factors like negotiations and mediation as well as political equilibrium between Courts and States and cultural and social variables.

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