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James Winter

Research Technician - Fermentation, Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences

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Biography

I have recently joined the School of Life Science as a member of the newly formed Synthetic Biology Research Centre.

After graduating from Nottingham-Trent University with a BSc honours degree in Forensic Science, I spent four years working for Abbott Laboratories as a Fermentation Technician where I manufactured targeted proteins for use in diagnostic blood testing kits. Later I moved into Technical Product Development where I investigated process issues and tested planned process improvements.

Subsequently I worked for Coca Cola Enterprises as Senior Microbiology Technical Operator where I monitored and dealt with issues concerning contamination throughout the factory, after which I worked for BioProduct Laboratories as a Plasma Processing Technician.

Research Summary

I am part of the Clostridia Research Group at the SBRC, which is part of the School of Life Sciences in the Faculty of Health and Medicine. During the course of the five year research project funded… read more

Current Research

I am part of the Clostridia Research Group at the SBRC, which is part of the School of Life Sciences in the Faculty of Health and Medicine. During the course of the five year research project funded by the BBSRC I will set up the new Bioreactor Laboratory for Aerobic Fermentations and be responsible for planning and overseeing the day-to-day running of the laboratory.

This includes allocating resources and staff rotations, providing technical training and assistance to staff members and postgraduate students, providing supervision of junior staff members and new students, setting and monitoring technical standards within the laboratory, maintaining the equipment and reviewing all documentation related to the area and all other general duties such as stock control and purchasing.

The aim of this project is to discover the viability and practicality of producing biofuels and other rare reagents through fermentations of various Clostridia and Ralstonia Eutropha, using SynGas to replicate the possible use of waste gases, such as the C1 gases produced in many industrial environments.

School of Life Sciences

University of Nottingham
Medical School
Queen's Medical Centre
Nottingham NG7 2UH

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