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Naglis Malys

Senior Research Fellow, Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences

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Biography

After completing PhD in Biochemistry, Naglis Malys moved to the University of Maryland, Baltimore, and worked under the direction of Prof. Lindsay W. Black. In 2002, he joined the University of Manchester and from 2005 he was an integral part of the Manchester Centre for Integrative Systems Biology led by Prof. Dauglas Kell, Prof. Hans Westerhoff and Prof. Pedro Mendes. He then moved to the University of Warwick in 2011 to work as Research Fellow with Prof. John McCarthy.

In June 2015, he joined the Synthetic Biology Research Centre led by Prof. Nigel Minton in the Centre for Biomolecular Sciences, University of Nottingham. Here, his research focuses on metabolic engineering with the use of synthetic biology tools to generate novel microbial strains for production of high value chemicals.

Research Summary

I am working within the Synthetic Biology Research Centre (SBRC). Here, we are interested in metabolic engineering and use of synthetic biology tools to generate microbial strains for production of… read more

Selected Publications

Current Research

I am working within the Synthetic Biology Research Centre (SBRC). Here, we are interested in metabolic engineering and use of synthetic biology tools to generate microbial strains for production of high value chemicals.

Past Research

I am biochemist with interests in systems and synthetic biology, as well as molecular mechanisms controlling gene expression. After my PhD, I have worked at the University of Maryland, Baltimore, developing phage display technology for investigating protein interactions. In 2002, I have joined the Posttransctiptional Control Group at the University of Manchester to study scavenger decapping enzymes and translation initiation factor EIF4E. After moving to the Manchester Centre for Integrative Systems Biology, my research has been in the field of systems biology, particularly focusing on human and microbial metabolism, metabolic pathways and their kinetic characterisation, and metabolic engineering. Since 2011, I have worked at the University of Warwick, focusing on the development and application of synthetic biology tools for studying processes in biological systems. I used S. cerevisiae as a model organism to investigate the cellular heterogeneity associated with gene expression and other modes of control. I joined the Synthetic Biology Research Centre in June 2015.

School of Life Sciences

University of Nottingham
Medical School
Queen's Medical Centre
Nottingham NG7 2UH

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