School of Life Sciences
  • Print
   
   
 

Image of Nick Beazley-Long

Nick Beazley-Long

Research Fellow, Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences

Contact

Biography

Nick is a neuroscientist whose research interests lie in the mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration and pain. His Neuroscience with Industrial Placement BSc (Hons) undergraduate degree was attained from The University of Manchester with a year in industry wisely spent in the Protein Expression and Purification laboratories of Boehringer Ingelheim, Biberach an der Riss, Germany. Nick undertook his PhD in Physiology, in the Microvascular Research Laboratories (MVRL) at The University of Bristol, headed by Prof. David Bates and Prof. Steven Harper. He investigated the role of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-A (VEGF-A) in models of neurodegeneration and pain using an in vivo nerve injury model, pain behavioural assays, and in vitro cytoprotection assays. Having briefly investigated the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in chemotherapy-induced pain as a postdoc at King's College King, Nick returned to the MVRL to study the effect of vemurafenib on VEGF-A isoforms levels in melanoma. Currently Nick is a research fellow in the Arthritis Research UK Pain Centre and the Lucy Donaldson laboratory at The University of Nottingham, investigating the potential of targeting VEGF-A to alleviate pain in inflammatory conditions of arthritis, in collaboration with Prof. David Bates and Dr. Richard Hulse.

Research Summary

The Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-A (VEGF-A) family of proteins exerts a myriad of actions during development, and in adult physiology and pathophysiology, that are not confined to one… read more

Selected Publications

Current Research

The Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-A (VEGF-A) family of proteins exerts a myriad of actions during development, and in adult physiology and pathophysiology, that are not confined to one particular cell type or physiological system. Originally identified as a key mediator of vascular perfusion and integrity, the actions of VEGF-A are widespread and complex both temporally and spatially. As a regulator of angiogenesis VEGF-A is targeted in many angiogenesis-dependent disease states including many cancers and retinopathies. In some instances targeting VEGF-A has significantly improved the lives of patients, look no further than the transformation of the treatment of age-related macular degeneration thanks to anti-VEGF-A therapy. I am interested in developing a better understanding the effects VEGF-A has in the nervous system in models of neurodegeneration and pain. Chronic pain affects and debilitates many people worldwide including rheumatoid and osteoarthritic patients. My previous work has identified that VEGF-A affects neurodegeneration and nociceptive (pain) signaling and targeting VEGF-A may be able to affect nociceptor sensitization and the development of chronic pain. My main research goal is to understand how, where and when targeting VEGF-A could be beneficial in models of nociceptive sensitization and chronic pain with a current focus on pain associated with inflammatory arthritis.

School of Life Sciences

University of Nottingham
Medical School
Queen's Medical Centre
Nottingham NG7 2UH

Contact us