School of Life Sciences
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Research in the Microbes group focuses on bacteria, archaea, viruses and eukaryotes.

We contribute to the fight against infectious diseases and antimicrobial resistance, through studies of:

  • host immunity
  • signalling
  • quorum sensing
  • sociomicrobiology
  • effector proteins
  • virulence
  • biofilms
  • predatory bacteria that eat pathogens
  • discovery of novel anti-infective agents
Immunology-466px

Microbes

 
 

We also study how:

  • microbes evolve
  • cell surfaces interact with the environment and other viruses
  • viruses work on molecular machineries that segregate proteins, organelles and chromosomes and those that replicate and repair DNA.

Principal investigators

Dr Thorsten Allers

DNA recombination and repair in the archaea

Stephen Atkinson

Temperature dependent quorum sensing (QS) systems

Professor Jonathan Ball

Translational hepatitis C virus (HCV) research

Dr Boyan Bonev

Biochemistry and biophysics of lipid membranes

Professor Miguel Camara

Bacterial signalling mechanisms and systems biology

Dr Catarina Gadelha

Trypanosome biology

Dr Kim Hardie

Bacterial secreted proteins: secretion, function and regulation

Dr Stephan Heeb

Post-transcriptional regulation of quorum sensing in Pseudomonads

Dr Alan Huett

Study of autophagy

Professor William Irving

Clinical virology: viral hepatitis and the human herpes viruses

Dr Luisa Martinez-Pomares

Mannose receptor in the recognition of allergens

Dr Neil Oldfield

Pathogens of Gram-negative bacterial infections

Dr Christopher Penfold

Functional analysis of the bacteriocin colicins

Professor Liz Sockett
(Academic Lead)

Bdellovibrio predatory bacteria: molecular biology and applications

Dr Alexander Tarr

Hepatitis C virus

Dr Bill Wickstead

Genome architecture, chromosome segregation and molecular motor function

Professor Paul Williams
(Academic Lead)

Molecular basis of bacterial pathogenicity and host-pathogen interactions

Dr Karl Wooldridge

Bacterial protein secretion and bacterial vaccines

 

 

School of Life Sciences

University of Nottingham
Medical School
Queen's Medical Centre
Nottingham NG7 2UH

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