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Ivette Fuentes

ResearchFellow/Associate Professor, Faculty of Science

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Biography

Ivette Fuentes is an Associate Professor at the University of Nottingham and holds a five-year EPSRC Career Acceleration Fellowship. She obtained her PhD in 2003 from Imperial College, working on quantum optics and quantum information. Her postdoctoral experience includes a fellowship at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, a Glasstone Fellowship at the University of Oxford, and a Junior Research Fellowship at Mansfield College. Alexander von Humboldt Fellowship. Ivette has worked on a number of topics within theoretical physics, such as fundamental quantum mechanics, quantum information, quantum optics, gravity and astrophysics. Currently, she studies how relativistic effects can be exploited for quantum information theory.

Expertise Summary

Her research field is relativistic quantum information and her main goal is to find suitable ways to store and process information using quantum systems in relativistic settings. She hopes to be able to find ways of exploiting relativistic resources to improve quantum information tasks such as teleportation and quantum cryptography. She is also interested in using tools developed in quantum information (for example entanglement measures) to address open questions in gravity and cosmology. The information loss problem in black holes is a good example of where applying quantum information concepts can be useful.

Research Summary

Relativistic quantum information is an emerging field which studies how to process information using quantum systems taking into account the relativistic nature of spacetime. My main aim is to find… read more

Recent Publications

Current Research

  • Relativistic quantum information

Relativistic quantum information is an emerging field which studies how to process information using quantum systems taking into account the relativistic nature of spacetime. My main aim is to find ways to exploit relativity to improve quantum information tasks such as teleportation and to develop new relativistic quantum technologies.

  • Relativistic quantum metrology

Quantum metrology techniques and quantum geometric phases can be applied to measure physical parameters that play an important role in quantum field theory. For example, using these techniques the Unruh temperature can be measured at accelerations up to a billion times smaller than previous proposals [1]. Moreover, entanglement can be used to determine spacetime parameters such as the expansion rate of the Universe [2]. [1] M. Aspachs, G. Adesso, & I. Fuentes, Phys. Rev. Lett., 105, 151301 (2010), E. Martin-Martinez, I. Fuentes, & R. B. Mann, Phys. Rev. Lett., 1067, 131301 (2011). [2] I. Fuentes, R. B. Mann, E. Martin-Martinez, & S. Moradi, Phys. Rev. D 82, 045030 (2010), JJ.L. Ball, I. Fuentes-Schuller & F.P. Schuller, Phys. Lett. A, 359, 550 (2006).

Past Research

Quantum Entanglement

Geometric phases

Many-body systems (BEC)

School of Mathematical Sciences

The University of Nottingham
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Nottingham, NG7 2RD

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