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Division of Child Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology

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William Atiomo

Clinical Associate Professor and Consultant Gynaecologist, Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences

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Biography

William Atiomo qualified at the University of Ibadan Nigeria in 1987. After a brief stint in Nigeria working in obstetrics and gynaecology, he travelled to the UK for his specialist training in Obstetrics and Gynaecology during which he gained wide and deep experience in clinical and academic obstetrics and gynaecology. In addition to successfully gaining the postgraduate qualifications in clinical obstetrics and gynaecology (MRCOG) he took time out pursue a doctoral degree in gynaecology and was awarded with a doctorate degree in medicine (MD) by the University of Plymouth for his work into the polycystic ovary syndrome (a common cause of female infertility). His initial specialist gynaecological training took place in University Hospitals in the Southwest Region of England (Exeter, Bristol and Plymouth). Following a decision to go into academic medicine, he worked as a clinical lecturer in obstetrics and gynaecology at the Royal Free and University College London Medical School from where he was appointed to his current post.

William Atiomo was awarded the fellowship of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists in recognition of his contribution to the specialty in 2007. William also holds a Masters degree in Higher and professional education from the Institute of Education, University of London and is a fellow of the UK higher education academy. William has had several research publications in gynaecology and was a member of the UK Medical Research Council (MRC) College of Experts affiliated to the health sciences and public health research board and is currently a member of the Royal College of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (RCOG) Reproductive Medicine Clinical Study Group and the College of Experts Affiliated to the UK National Institute of Health Research Health Technology Assessment board. William reviews research grant applications for the MRC, Wellbeing of Women research charity and the Scottish executive. William is on the editorial advisory board for the open proteomics journal and has undertaken editorial review work for the British Medical Journal, Human Reproduction and several other prestigious journals in obstetrics and gynaecology.

William has also run four full marathons (Robin Hood twice, Edinburgh and the Brathay, Windermere marathon in the Lake District) raising money for Oxfam and for a local Hospice (Treetops) and he has played chess for Exeter chess club, Devon county, the University of Nottingham and West Nottingham Chess Club.

Expertise Summary

Teaching Summary

William also holds a Masters degree in Higher and professional education from the Institute of Education, University of London and is a fellow of the UK higher education academy. He is currently the… read more

Research Summary

PCOS is the commonest cause of anovulatory infertility in women. Women may also suffer from cancer of the womb, obesity, diabetes and hirsutism. It is present in 5-10% of women in the UK population… read more

Selected Publications

William also holds a Masters degree in Higher and professional education from the Institute of Education, University of London and is a fellow of the UK higher education academy. He is currently the Head of the Obstetrics and Gynaecology Clinical Phase 2 course at Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham and was previously module lead for obstetrics and gynaecology for the University across all hospital sites. He has represented the University on a Steering committee on inter-professional learning project, acted as internal and external examiner for doctoral degrees, been post graduate RCOG college Tutor, Academic Representative on the Trent North School of postgraduate obstetrics and gynaecology and published on medical education. William has also been a Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologist Preceptor for Advanced Training in Hysteroscopic and Laparoscopic Surgery

Current Research

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome - (PCOS) Research Group

PCOS is the commonest cause of anovulatory infertility in women. Women may also suffer from cancer of the womb, obesity, diabetes and hirsutism. It is present in 5-10% of women in the UK population and the current estimated annual costs of diagnosing and treating infertility secondary to PCOS range from £16 to £22 million pounds. The health economic impact of PCOS in the USA has been estimated as ranging from $ 93 million to $ 1.77 billion. The PCOS research group is headed by Mr William Atiomo. The team includes collaborators from the school of biomedical sciences (Dr Robert Layfield and David Tooth), the clinical trials support unit, the school of pharmacy (Clare Daykin and Professor David Barrett) and the departments of dietetics and radiology at Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham. External collaborators have involved the Royal Free and University College Medical School, London, the School of Biochemical and Natural Sciences, Nottingham Trent University and industry (Novozymes-Delta Limited, Nottingham), Hull York Medical School (Atkin and Sathyalapan), Leicester (Konje) and Sheffield (Lashen). The research program has focused on three main themes. The first theme involved identifying novel genomic, proteomic and metabonomic biomarkers for the improved diagnosis, risk stratification and treatment of PCOS, the second on understanding whether improving insulin resistance through diet and insulin sensitizers reduce the clinical, histological and molecular markers of endometrial cancer PCOS and more recent collaborations have been developed to investigate the long term health risks of PCOS including Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Cardiovascular disease. Work from the PCOS research group has resulted in successful research grants, high impact research publications and international, national and local research presentations (including winning an award at a regional proteomics meeting). The group has also supervised several undergraduate and postgraduate student projects. Novel biomarkers have been identified and are being validated. Patents have also been filed. A novel database of the identities, function and pathways of the in-house and external proteomic biomarkers identified in the literature in women with PCOS has recently been developed to provide a framework for scientists globally to facilitate a systems approach to profiling future biomarkers in PCOS. A novel, software for assessing compliance to a low glycaemic index diet has also been developed. Further work is ongoing to develop the key research themes of the group.

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome - (PCOS) Research Group

PCOS is the commonest cause of anovulatory infertility in women. Women may also suffer from cancer of the womb, obesity, diabetes and hirsutism. It is present in 5-10% of women in the UK population and the current estimated annual costs of diagnosing and treating infertility secondary to PCOS range from £16 to £22 million pounds. The health economic impact of PCOS in the USA has been estimated as ranging from $ 93 million to $ 1.77 billion. The PCOS research group is headed by Mr William Atiomo. The team includes collaborators from the school of biomedical sciences (Dr Robert Layfield and David Tooth), the clinical trials support unit, the school of pharmacy (Clare Daykin and Professor David Barrett) and the departments of dietetics and radiology at Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham. External collaborators have involved the Royal Free and University College Medical School, London, the School of Biochemical and Natural Sciences, Nottingham Trent University and industry (Novozymes-Delta Limited, Nottingham), Hull York Medical School (Atkin and Sathyalapan), Leicester (Konje) and Sheffield (Lashen).

The research program has focused on three main themes. The first theme involved identifying novel genomic, proteomic and metabonomic biomarkers for the improved diagnosis, risk stratification and treatment of PCOS, the second on understanding whether improving insulin resistance through diet and insulin sensitizers reduce the clinical, histological and molecular markers of endometrial cancer PCOS and more recent collaborations have been developed to investigate the long term health risks of PCOS including Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Cardiovascular disease. Work from the PCOS research group has resulted in successful research grants, high impact research publications and international, national and local research presentations (including winning an award at a regional proteomics meeting).

The group has also supervised several undergraduate and postgraduate student projects. Novel biomarkers have been identified and are being validated. Patents have also been filed. A novel database of the identities, function and pathways of the in-house and external proteomic biomarkers identified in the literature in women with PCOS has recently been developed to provide a framework for scientists globally to facilitate a systems approach to profiling future biomarkers in PCOS. A novel, software for assessing compliance to a low glycaemic index diet has also been developed. Further work is ongoing to develop the key research themes of the group.

Past Research

  1. The plasminogen activator system in PCOS
  2. Endometrial cancer risk in women with PCOS
  3. Familial associations in PCOS

Future Research

  1. Long term risks of Type 2 Diabetes and Myocardial Infarction in Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS).
  2. Validation of biomarkers to improve the prediction of women with PCOS who develop Type 2 diabetes.
  3. Validation of biomarkers to improve the prediction of which obese pregnant women develop type 2 diabetes.
  4. Development of a new gynaecological device to improve the safety of endometrial ablation for heavy menstrual periods.

School of Medicine

University of Nottingham
Medical School
Nottingham, NG7 2UH

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