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Katrin Krumbholz

Scientific Programme Leader, Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences

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Biography

Previous appointments:

  • 2009-current: Programme Leader, MRC Institute of Hearing Research (IHR), UK
  • 2004-2009: Programme Leader Track, MRC IHR, UK
  • 2002-2004: Senior Research Associate, Research Centre Jülich, DE
  • 2001-2002: Research Associate, University Hospital Münster, DE
  • 1998-2001: Research Associate, University of Cambridge, UK

Research Summary

Our research is concerned with the mechanisms of hearing and hearing impairment. We use EEG adaptation to probe auditory neural response properties at subcortical and cortical processing levels. We… read more

Recent Publications

Current Research

Our research is concerned with the mechanisms of hearing and hearing impairment. We use EEG adaptation to probe auditory neural response properties at subcortical and cortical processing levels. We conduct fine-grain mapping of the functional and structural properties of human auditory cortex using high-resolution ultra-high-field MRI.

Past Research

Our past research has revealed that:

  1. Different sound features (e.g., source laterality, pitch or vowel identity) are represented in different locations and by different coding mechanisms in human auditory cortex.
  2. Human auditory cortex contains a representation of pitch chroma (i.e., the position of a musical note within an octave). This representation may be disrupted in people with amusia.
  3. The properties of adaptation (stimulus specificity and decay time) change when the adaptor is presented repeatedly, suggesting that adaptation plays an active role in auditory perception.
  4. Cochlear spectral processing has a major influence on the sub-cortical representation of speech sounds.
  5. Contralateral activation of the medial olivocochlear bundle causes significant reduction in cochlear gain measured psychophysically.

Future Research

Our future research will investigate:

  1. The role of sub-cortical processing in tinnitus generation.
  2. Changes in spontaneous cortical oscillations as a result of tinnitus perception and distress.
  3. The effects of hearing impairment or aging on sub-cortical temporal processing and cortical tonotopic organization.
  4. The functional role of stimulus-specific adaptation.

School of Medicine

University of Nottingham
Medical School
Nottingham, NG7 2UH

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