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Division of Clinical Neuroscience 

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Ravi Mahajan

Professor of Anaesthesia & Intensive Care; Head of Division, Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences

Contact

  • workRoom University Division of anaesthesia and Intensive Care Queen's Medical Centre
    Queen's Medical Centre
    Nottingham
    NG7 2UH
    UK
  • work0115 823 1009

Research Summary

Interests

  • Vascular reactivity.
  • Development of models for assessment.
  • Mechanisms, applications and strategies to influence clinical outcome in sepsis.
  • Muscle dysfunction in critical care

Techniques

  • Determination of vascular reactivity in vivo and ex vivo using a variety of approaches.
  • Noninvasive assessment of cerebral vascular reactivity (transcranial Doppler).
  • Assessment of skin vascular reactivity (Laser Doppler).

Projects

  • Vascular reactivity and clinical outcome in ICU (funded by Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland).
  • Role of various therapeutic interventions (vasopressin, steroids) in restoring vascular reactivity during sepsis (funded by Anaesthetic Research Society, UK and European Society of Anaesthesiology).
  • Gene mechanisms determining myopathy in critical care (funded by European Society of Anaesthesiology)

Centre Collaborators

  • Prof. Terence Bennett
  • Prof. Sheila Gardiner
  • Prof. Paul Greenhaff
  • Dr. Vincent Wilson

Local Collaborators

  • Dr K Girling (NHS, critical care)
  • Dr J Hardman (Senior Lecturer, Anaesthesia)
  • Prof A Perkins (Medical Physics)
  • Mr D Clay (NHS, Medical Physics)
  • Dr W Kinnear (NHS, Respiratory Medicine)
  • Mr J Duffy (NHS, Thoracic Surgery)

UK Collaborators

  • Professor PM Hopkins (Leeds)
  • Professor CS Reilly (Sheffield)
  • Dr Zoe Brookes (Sheffield)

International Collaborators

  • Professor P Bithal (AIIMS India)

Selected Publications

Future Research

Clinical and volunteer studies using new techniques of photoglottography and acceleromyelography developed within the department. These were used to compare the effects of different muscle relaxants on laryngeal muscles, the diaphragm and peripheral muscles.

School of Medicine

University of Nottingham
Medical School
Nottingham, NG7 2UH

Contacts: Please see our 'contact us' page for further details