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Jen Yates

Research Fellow, Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences

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Biography

After studying for an undergraduate degree in psychology at Bangor University, Jen was awarded an Economic and Social Research Council 1+3 studentship to complete an MSc in psychological research and a PhD in psychology. Jen's PhD investigated the relationship between mild cognitive impairment and mood in older people through the lens of social cognitive theory, focusing on the role of subjective memory complaints. The research was carried out as part of the Cognitive Function and Ageing Study Wales (CFAS Wales), and Jen's PhD was awarded by Bangor University without conditions or corrections in June 2015.

In September 2014, Jen joined the Division of Rehabilitation and Ageing in the School of Medicine at the University of Nottingham as a Clinical Theme Fellow working on the East Midlands Academic Health Science Network (EMAHSN) Stroke Rehabilitation Programme. During this role, Jen was responsible for developing and delivering a programme of workshops with four large community stroke teams across the East Midlands, aimed at enhancing effective multidisciplinary team working and guiding the development of service improvement initiatives. Additionally, Jen worked with key stakeholders to explore and improve the use of data by service providers and commissioners, to drive service improvement and facilitate communities of good practice. Jen led the programme's approach to the measurement and evaluation of their impacts to capture how and why the programme had been successful and what lessons may be learnt for future programmes.

In April 2016, Jen joined moved to the Division of Psychiatry and Applied Psychology to work on the Achieving Quality and Effectiveness in Dementia Crisis Teams (Aqueduct) programme of research. This programme will develop a model of best practice and a resource kit for crisis teams managing dementia. The effectiveness of the resource kit will be evaluated with a cluster randomised controlled trial of twenty teams, and the facilitators and barriers to implementation will be explored through the development of an implementation measure and associated qualitative work.

Jen is also an associate editor for the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, and a Chartered Member of the British Psychological Society.

Research Summary

Jen's current research focuses on establishing a model of best practice within crisis teams managing dementia as part of the AQUEDUCT programme of research, please see the website for more… read more

Recent Publications

Current Research

Jen's current research focuses on establishing a model of best practice within crisis teams managing dementia as part of the AQUEDUCT programme of research, please see the website for more information:

http://www.institutemh.org.uk/x-research-/aqueduct

Jen is passionate about the field of implementation, and in particular implementation in the longer term, considering the context and 'on the ground' challenges that may be faced outside of the clinical trial environment. Jen enjoys conducting research using a mixed methods approach of both quantitative and qualitative methods.

Past Research

Jen's PhD formed part of the Cognitive Function and Ageing Study Wales (CFAS Wales) multicentre investigation into cognitive functioning in older people. This study, coupled with the MRC funded Cognitive Function and Ageing Study II, involved conducting interviews with people over the age of 65 in Gwynedd, Anglesey, Swansea, Cambridgeshire, Nottingham, and Newcastle to explore cognitive functioning, health and well-being in a large, representative sample. Jen's PhD focused on investigating how mild cognitive impairment and mood were related to each other, and in particular the role of subjective memory complaints in this relationship. Jen employed a variety of quantitative methods such as logistic regression analyses and structural equation modelling to explore factors that contribute to the experience of cognitive decline and mood problems in older people.

School of Medicine

University of Nottingham
Medical School
Nottingham, NG7 2UH

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