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Division of Rehabilitation and Ageing

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Nadina Lincoln

Professor of Clinical Psychology, Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences

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Biography

Prof. Nadina Lincoln undertook her first degree in Psychology at the University of Wales, Cardiff, before going on to complete her Master's in Clinical Psychology at the University of Leeds. She worked for the NHS during which time she also studied for her PhD part-time at the University of London, and then worked in NHS as clinical psychologist until she joined the University of Nottingham in 1994.

Expertise Summary

Keywords:

Randomised trials of complex interventions, stroke, multiple sclerosis, dementia, cognitive impairments

Research Summary

Currently Prof. Lincoln's main research area is the evaluation of cognitive rehabilitation for people with neurological conditions. She is co-investigator on the ReMemBrIn trial, a randomised… read more

Recent Publications

Current Research

Currently Prof. Lincoln's main research area is the evaluation of cognitive rehabilitation for people with neurological conditions. She is co-investigator on the ReMemBrIn trial, a randomised controlled trial to evaluate memory rehabilitation for people with traumatic brain injury. She is Principal Investigator on the CRAMMS trial, a similar trial to evaluate cognitive rehabilitation for attention and memory in people with multiple sclerosis.

Her recent research has also involved studies on the role of cognitive tests in the assessment of fitness to drive in people with head injury, multiple sclerosis and dementia.She has also been responsible for developing the Stroke Drivers Screening Assessment and the Nottingham Assessment for Drivers with Dementia.

Past Research

Her past research has mainly been in the field of stroke rehabilitation. Early studies in this field were directed at developing outcome measures with sufficient reliability and validity to enable them to be used in the evaluation of different clinical interventions. Some of these measures, such as the Rivermead Motor Assessment, Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Scale and Stroke Aphasic Depression Questionnaire, have become widely used both nationally and internationally. The measures developed have been used to evaluate a number of clinical interventions, including speech therapy for aphasic patients, a specialist stroke rehabilitation unit, physiotherapy for arm function and occupational therapy for patients discharged from hospital. She has also carried out evaluations in psychological aspects of rehabilitation, including the treatment of cognitive deficits and depression.

School of Medicine

University of Nottingham
Medical School
Nottingham, NG7 2UH

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