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Division of Rehabilitation and Ageing

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Shirley Thomas

Associate Professor, Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences

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Biography

Dr Shirley Thomas achieved her BSc in Psychology at the University of Nottingham, then stayed on to do her PhD immediately afterwards, looking at: "factors relating to emotional distress after stroke". She received a therapy research bursary from Stroke Association, for which she was based in the division of Rehabilitation & Ageing as a research fellow, and was a part-time research tutor at the same time for the Trent Doctorte in Clinical Psychology (DClinPsy), employed by the University of Lincoln. Shirley joined the Institute full time as a lecturer in Rehabilitation Psychology in January 2009.

Expertise Summary

Keywords:

Psychological aspects of stroke rehabilitation, patient mood assessment, aphasia, randomised controlled trial

Teaching Summary

Dr Shirley Thomas is the Course Director for the MSc in Rehabilitation Psychology.

She is module convenor for the following modules: Core Research Methods Forensic, Health and Clinical Research Methods, Clinical Skills and Theoretical Foundations of Rehabilitation.

She contributes to teaching on the modules Assessment of Cognitive Function, Stroke and Analytical Research Methods.

Shirley supervises MSc project students across areas of applied psychology.

She also supervises PhD students. Students thesis includes investigating how couples cope with breast cancer, communication between care home staff and residents with dementia, and depression after stroke

Research Summary

Dr Thomas' broad research interest in is the psychological aspects of physical illness and disability, in particular mood problems. She is interested in identifying what factors are related to people… read more

Recent Publications

Current Research

Dr Thomas' broad research interest in is the psychological aspects of physical illness and disability, in particular mood problems. She is interested in identifying what factors are related to people developing mood problems and the tools for assessing mood and evaluating psychological interventions for low mood. To date her research has been concerned with people who have suffered a stroke.

She is currently leading the CALM (Communication and Low Mood) study, which is a multicentre randomised controlled trial to evaluate behaviour therapy for treating low mood in people with aphasia after stroke. This is funded by the Stroke Association and involves evaluating psychological intervention for low mood called behaviour therapy . In particular this concerns stroke patients with aphasia, a communication problem. The study focuses on assessing and treating mood problems in this group. This is a unique study in terms of what it does and the people it works with, as most research into mood problems after stroke so far has excluded people with communication problems.

School of Medicine

University of Nottingham
Medical School
Nottingham, NG7 2UH

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