School of Medicine
  • Print
   
   

School staff listing

People listings by divisions

 

Image of Andy Green

Andy Green

Assistant Professor, Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences

Contact

Biography

Dr Andy Green has over 24 years in the practical experience of the investigation into breast cancer at the molecular level. He was awarded a PhD from the University of Hull, in 1997 on 'Regulatory factors in human breast' particularly focussing on the mechanisms involved in estrogen biosynthesis using in vitro primary cell models. Subsequently, Andy spent six years at the MRC Toxicology Unit, Leicester, primarily investigating the carcinogenic mechanisms of selective estrogen receptor modulators using in vivo models. In 2003, Andy joined the Breast Cancer Pathology Research Group in the School of Medicine at the University of Nottingham led by Prof Ian Ellis. His main focus is the exploration of the hypothesis that a novel classification of breast cancer based on phenotypic and molecular genetic characteristics will provide a more robust system for classification and therapeutic decision-making. Through his research he has continued to utilise digital pathology to maximise research.

Andy has a sustained publication track record with over 200 publications in international scientific journals and is a member of the British Breast Group, Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland and the British Association for Cancer Research

Expertise Summary

My main research expertise is within breast cancer molecular pathology using techniques such as immunohistochemistry, tissue microarrays (TMAs), laser microdissection and gene expression profiling,

Teaching Summary

I am the BMedSci Honours Year Lead for the School of Medicine and also am the Homebased Lead for the Division of Cancer and Stem cells.

Since 2006, I have regularly taught several lectures on the BMedSci (CLS), BSc Healthcare Science, MSc Oncology, MSc Clinical Genetics courses.

I have a sustained record in the design and marking of assessments acting as Internal assessor for BMedSci, MSc Clinical Sciences, MSc Oncology research projects and performing vivas. Also marking exams and acting as a moderator.

I also act as a Pastoral tutor for BMedSci and MSc Oncology students.

Research Summary

My main research focus is the exploration of the hypothesis that a novel classification of breast cancer based on phenotypic and molecular genetic characteristics will provide a more robust system… read more

Selected Publications

My principle role is research focused and involves the leadership, development, planning, management and practical implementation of individual and collaborative research projects. Furthermore, I am directly involved in development of concepts, ideas and strategies, including the principal investigator role, preparation and submission of successful research grant applications. My role also includes leadership, management and administrative duties and to provide knowledge transfer and guidance to staff/students. Additionally I am involved in preparation of research publications as lead or contributing author resulting in a sustained publication track record and national reputation in this field.

Current Research

My main research focus is the exploration of the hypothesis that a novel classification of breast cancer based on phenotypic and molecular genetic characteristics will provide a more robust system for classification and therapeutic decision-making. As a consequence modern classification of breast cancer should be based on combined morphological, phenotypic (protein expression) and molecular genetic characteristics. This will provide a more robust system for classification and therapeutic decision-making and allow identification of novel therapeutic targets.

Breast cancer is a heterogenous disease comprising different molecular characteristics, clinical behaviour and treatment response. Luminal breast cancer comprise the majority of tumours but many patients relapse or develop resistance to current treatments particularly the more aggressive Luminal B tumours.

Current research

Metabolic pathway deregulation is a hallmark of cancer where tumours are able to regulate their metabolism to provide energy required for their subsequent growth particularly those undergoing rapid proliferation. Critically, some tumours, including Luminal B tumours, become dependent on Glutamine (Gln) for their cell growth and become "addicted".

My current research hypothesis is focused on glutaminolysis and Gln transporters having a key role in the aggressive forms of breast cancer particularly Luminal B tumours. It is anticipated that they could act as potential therapeutic targets.

Past Research

I have sustained international publication record on breast cancer pathology research since 1995 and have contributed to over 220 peer reviewed publications in journals including those of high impact: NATURE, NATURE MEDICINE, JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY, and PLoS MEDICINE.

Future Research

Future research directions include the investigation of glutamine metabolism in the agressive forms of breast cancer to improve our insight into its role in tumour pathobiology and patient outcome in the aggressive breast cancer subtype.

School of Medicine

University of Nottingham
Medical School
Nottingham, NG7 2UH

Contacts: Please see our 'contact us' page for further details