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Winfried Amoaku

Clinical Assoc Prof & Reader in Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences, Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences

Contact

  • workRoom B Floor Eye and ENT Centre, University Hospital, QMC
    Queen's Medical Centre
    Nottingham
    NG7 2UH
    UK
  • work0115 951 5151
  • fax0115 962 7765

Expertise Summary

My research complements my clinical practice: age-related macular degeneration (AMD) (the commonest cause of blindness in the western world). It focuses on the pathogenesis and treatments of AMD and other chronic eye diseases (clinical and laboratory). Current treatments are suboptimal. As the population ages the prevalence of AMD will increase. My research aims to improve disease outcome. There are no suitable animal or inv vitro models for AMD. My laboratory is the first to have cultured, in vitro, human inner choroidal endothelial cells (the site of the disease) for experiments into the disease. We are currently in the process of determining genomic differences between these cells and other endothelial cells in the eye and from other locations (eg HUVEC) in order to determine molecular targeting. Some of our work has been in collaboration with a laboratory in Kings' College, London who have expertise in microarrays and supporting validating technologies. AMD seems less common in the African. Genetic and environmental factors which contribute to these differences require elucidation. On going collaborations with Queen's University of Belfast, University of Iowa and Utah, The University of Ghana Medical School are looking at genetic differences between the African and Caucasians in the pathogenesis of AMD.

Research Summary

The effects of diabetes on proliferating human tenon's capsule fibroblast. To determine the proliferative potential of human tenon's fibroblasts in diabetics and compare that to normals Investigate… read more

Selected Publications

Current Research

The effects of diabetes on proliferating human tenon's capsule fibroblast. To determine the proliferative potential of human tenon's fibroblasts in diabetics and compare that to normals Investigate the collagen and protein synthesis by tenon's fibroblasts in normals and diabetics. Study of cytokine growth factor activity in the aqueous humour of diabetics and non-diabetics. To determine how different growth factors modify tenon's fibroblasts growth and synthetic capabilities in diabetics and normals.

My current research complements my clinical practice: age-related macular degeneration (AMD) (the commonest cause of blindness in the western world). It focuses on the pathogenesis and treatments of AMD and other chronic eye diseases (clinical and laboratory). Current treatments are suboptimal. As the population ages the prevalence of AMD will increase. My research aims to improve disease outcome. There are no suitable animal or inv vitro models for AMD. My laboratory is the first to have cultured, in vitro, human inner choroidal endothelial cells (the site of the disease) for experiments into the disease. We are currently in the process of determining genomic differences between these cells and other endothelial cells in the eye and from other locations (eg HUVEC) in order to determine molecular targeting. Some of our work has been in collaboration with a laboratory in Kings' College, London who have expertise in microarrays and supporting validating technologies. AMD seems less common in the African. Genetic and environmental factors which contribute to these differences require elucidation. On going collaborations with Queen's University of Belfast, University of Iowa and Utah, The University of Ghana Medical School are looking at genetic differences between the African and Caucasians in the pathogenesis of AMD. Non-infective intraocular inmflammations also continue to give clinical challenges to treatment. Finding safer treatments will be beneficial.

Past Research

The effects of ionising radiation on the eye. The effects of ionising radiation on corneal cells in vitro. This is to determine the relative importance of corneal epithelium, stroma and endothelium in the initiation and progress of radiation keratopathy and how to modify these changes. (This is in collaboration with Radiobiology/Oncology Departments of the City Hospital, Nottingham) The effects of ionising radiation on the vitreous body.

Future Research

The next steps would be find particular molecules which will selectively target particular endothelial cells in the eye. That way we should be able to ensure selectivity of action in particular diseases.

School of Medicine

University of Nottingham
Medical School
Nottingham, NG7 2UH

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