'Junk DNA' could spotlight breast and bowel cancer

   
   
05 Jan 2010 13:27:00.000

PA 03/10

 

Scientists at The University of Nottingham have found that a group of genetic rogue elements, produced by DNA sequences commonly known as ‘junk DNA’, could help diagnose breast and bowel cancer. Their research, funded by Cancer Research UK, is published in this month’s Genomics journal.

 

The researchers, led by Dr Cristina Tufarelli, in the School of Graduate Entry Medicine and Health Sciences, discovered that seven of these faulty genetic elements — known as chimeric transcripts — are more common in breast cancer cells. Five were only present in breast cancer cells while two were found in both normal and breast cancer cells.

 

These rogue elements are produced by DNA sequences called LINE-1 (L1). Despite being labelled as ‘junk DNA’ it is clear that some of these sequences have important roles in the genome, such as influencing when genes are switched on.

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L1s carry a switch that is able to randomly turn on nearby genes. When genes are inappropriately switched on in this way they make the genetic rogue elements that can sabotage the normal functioning of cells. To prevent the potentially damaging effects of these rogue elements, normal cells silence L1s with a chemical ‘off switch’. In cancerous cells this ‘off switch’ is often missing, leading to the production of these genetic rogue elements.

 

Dr Tufarelli, a lecturer at the University who has also received funding from a Royal Society Dorothy Hodgkin Research Fellowship, said: “This study has generated new research tools to investigate the role of ‘junk DNA’ in cancer development. The next step is to find out if the switching on of these genes is driving cancer or if they are a result of the cancer. Even if they are innocent bystanders of cancer they could be useful biomarkers helping us to diagnose or monitor the disease.”

 

The researchers extended their studies to look at two bowel cancer cell lines. Two of the genetic rogue elements were found in invasive bowel cancer cell lines, but not in the pre-invasive cells, suggesting that these sequences could play a role in cancer progression. 

 

Dr Tufarelli said: “If this ‘junk DNA’ does turn out to play a role in cancer then we could be at the tip of the iceberg in understanding a completely new mechanism behind the disease. If we do find out that they are playing a role then they could be useful targets for new treatments.”

 

Dr Lesley Walker, Cancer Research UK’s director of cancer information, said: “These really interesting findings are the most comprehensive study of these transcripts that have ever been carried out. We are learning more about the genes involved in cancer but these so-called ‘junk’ regions receive relatively little attention. We are beginning to see that they could play a really important role.”

 

— Ends —

 

Notes to editors: The University of Nottingham is ranked in the UK's Top 10 and the World's Top 100 universities by the Shanghai Jiao Tong (SJTU) and Times Higher (THE) World University Rankings.

 

More than 90 per cent of research at The University of Nottingham is of international quality, according to RAE 2008, with almost 60 per cent of all research defined as ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’. Research Fortnight analysis of RAE 2008 ranks the University 7th in the UK by research power. In 27 subject areas, the University features in the UK Top Ten, with 14 of those in the Top Five.

 

The University provides innovative and top quality teaching, undertakes world-changing research, and attracts talented staff and students from 150 nations. Described by The Times as Britain's “only truly global university”, it has invested continuously in award-winning campuses in the United Kingdom, China and Malaysia. Twice since 2003 its research and teaching academics have won Nobel Prizes. The University has won the Queen's Award for Enterprise in both 2006 (International Trade) and 2007 (Innovation — School of Pharmacy), and was named ‘Entrepreneurial University of the Year’ at the Times Higher Education Awards 2008.

 

Nottingham was designated as a Science City in 2005 in recognition of its rich scientific heritage, industrial base and role as a leading research centre. Nottingham has since embarked on a wide range of business, property, knowledge transfer and educational initiatives (www.science-city.co.uk) in order to build on its growing reputation as an international centre of scientific excellence. The University of Nottingham is a partner in Nottingham: the Science City.

 

Cancer Research UK is the world’s leading charity dedicated to beating cancer through research. The charity’s groundbreaking work into the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of cancer has saved millions of lives.  This work is funded entirely by the public. Cancer Research UK has been at the heart of the progress that has already seen survival rates double in the last 30 years. Cancer Research UK supports research into all aspects of cancer through the work of more than 4,500 scientists, doctors and nurses. Together with its partners and supporters, Cancer Research UK's vision is to beat cancer. For further information about Cancer Research UK's work or to find out how to support the charity, please call 020 7121 6699 or visit www.cancerresearchuk.org.

Story credits

More information is available from Simon Shears in the Cancer Research UK press office on +44 (0) 20 7061 8054, simon.shears@cancer.org.uk
Lindsay Brooke

Lindsay Brooke - Media Relations Manager

Email: lindsay.brooke@nottingham.ac.uk Phone: +44 (0)115 951 5751 Location: University Park

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