European Law LLM

 
  

Fact file

Qualification
LLM European Law
Duration
1 year full-time, 2 years part-time
Entry requirements
2.1 (or international equivalent) in law, humanities or social sciences
Other requirements
IELTS
7.0 (with no less than 7.0 in writing, 6.5 in reading and 6.0 in speaking and listening)

If these grades are not met, English preparatory courses are available
Start date
September
Campus
University Park
School/department
Law
Tuition fees
You can find fee information on our fees table.
 

Overview

This course offers a broad perspective on the governance of Europe and the role of its institutions in the global legal order.
Read full overview

The European Law LLM is for those students who wish to develop specialist knowledge of the European legal order. We offer a broad perspective that encompasses both the law of the supranational European Union as well as the intergovernmental Council of Europe.

The modules offered on the LLM address both the role of these institutions in the global legal order as well as the substantive laws they have adopted. You can choose modules in those aspects of European law that are of interest to you, whether it is the Council of Europe's flagship European Convention on Human Rights or the EU's regulation of consumer protection or its intellectual property regimes.

Key facts

  • The School of Law was ranked 41st best law school in the world, and 9th in the UK, by the QS World Rankings by Subject 2016
  • Since its introduction in 1987, our LLM programme has continued to grow in popularity and prestige and now attracts some 140 to 160 students each year, from more than 50 countries, confirming its status as one of the leading LLM programmes available
  • Research-led teaching means that you will be exposed to current issues, advanced debate, and innovative thinking and regular guest seminars and lectures, delivered by distinguished scholars and practitioners complement teaching in the school
  • Dedicated resources for students in the school, including a Legal Skills Advisor who delivers workshops and one-to-one sessions, a Law School computer room, and a Law Reading Room in the Hallward Library, contribute to a unique and positive learning experience
  • The school enjoys professional relationships with international institutions, leading UK law firms, private industry and consultancies, government departments, both foreign and domestic, and non-governmental organisations
 

Course details

You must complete at least 90 credits worth of modules from the qualifying specialist module options for the European Law LLM. The remaining 30 credits required to complete the taught stage of the degree can be chosen from the full suite of modules offered across all of our LLM programmes.

In addition, you must choose a dissertation topic which falls within the field of European law. Guidance and support on deciding a dissertation topic and designing your project will be provided through bespoke workshops and one-to-one support.

Teaching

The LLM programme operates small group seminar teaching wherever possible, allowing for an integrative and interactive learning experience. You are encouraged and expected to prepare for, and participate in, seminars so that you get the maximum benefit from these teaching sessions.

Modular assessments

All taught courses are assessed by examination or essay, or a combination of both. All assessments take place at the end of the spring term.

Practice assignments, workshops on issues such as exam technique and time management, as well as one-to-one sessions with the Legal Skills Advisor are offered throughout the academic year to prepare you for these assessments.

 
 

Modules

Qualifying module options

Advanced Copyright and Design Law

The module will deal with special issues in copyright and international exploitation of copyright works at advanced level. 

First of all we will look in depth at the basic elements of copyright and we will do so via a case study on sensory copyright (smells and taste). Our attention will then turn to enforcement and injunctions against intermediaries, and also jurisdictions issues and choice of law issues (ubiquitous infringement). On the EU side we will look at exhaustion (digital exhaustion) and competition law. 

Finally we will look at fair use and the protection of derivative works.

This module aims to:

  • facilitate the understanding and knowledge at an advanced level of the nature and function of specific issues of copyright law, relating to new technologies
 
Commercial Conflict of Laws

This module will involve a critical analysis of the conflict of laws rules dealing with issues arising in a commercial context. The module begins with jurisdiction and recognition and enforcement of foreign judgments. The module then deals with choice of law issues in contract and tort. Because of the growing role of the European Union in this area, the interaction between European and traditional English approaches to commercial conflict of laws issues will be a pervasive theme of the module.

The module aims to develop knowledge and understanding of substantive conflict of laws principles. The module further aims to develop the students' ability to identify the legal signficance of the international dimension in a legal problem and resolve it, particularly in a commercial context.  

 
EU Competition Law

The module examines the legal regulation of competition within the single and free market of the EU and serves as an introduction to basic legal and economic principles as well as to detailed study of the rules of Union law which seek to outlaw competitive behaviour.

This module aims to:

  • provide an advanced level course on the European Union Competition Law
 
The European Convention on Human Rights

The module covers articles 2, 3, 5, 6, 8 and 10 of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR), together with the procedural provisions of the ECHR.

This module aims to:

  • develop a critical understanding of the jurisprudence of fundamental rights contained in the European Convention on Human Rights
 
Governance of the EU

This half option explores the European Union's constitutional system and governance structures. We will discuss the unique nature of the EU as an integrated multilevel legal order of European nation states in which, in certain areas, powers have been transferred to federal institutions.

Theories of federalism, functionalism and institutionalism will be explored and notions of the legal and political accountability of the EU as a "system of governance" are a core feature of the module. The use of law as a mechanism for integration, and the role of the courts in such a process, will be examined. 

This subject can be studied as a stand alone half option or as a companion to other modules in the LLM in European Law and Public International Law. 

This module aims to:

  • study the governance of the EU at an advanced level
 
International and Comparative Copyright Law

The module will deal with the basic principles of copyright law at an advanced level. British copyright law will be studied with reference to the international and European obligations of the United Kingdom in this respect. This covers an introduction to copyright law, subject-matter of protection, authorship, ownership and dealings, economic and moral rights, term of protection, infringement and defences.

This module aims to:

  • facilitate the understanding and knowledge at an advanced level of the nature and function of copyright law
 
International and Comparative Patent Law

The module will deal with the basic principles of patent law and it will do so from an international and comparative perspective. Special attention will be paid to European and US patent law before attention will turn to biotechnological inventions and a case study on stem cell patents.

This module aims to:

  • facilitate the understanding and knowledge at an advanced level of nature and function of patent law as well as of specific issues of patent law, in relation to biotechnological inventions
 
International and Comparative Trade Mark Law

The module will deal with the basic principles of trade mark law and it will do so from an international and comparative perspective. Special attention will be paid to European and US trade mark law before attention will turn to passing-off and comparative advertising issues.

This module aims to:

  • facilitate the understanding and knowledge at an advanced level of nature and function of trade mark law as well as of specific issues related to trade mark law, such as passing-off and comparative advertising
 
International Commercial Arbitration

This module offers the fundamentals of international commercial arbitration, the most important dispute resolution mechanism for international business transactions.

The module begins with the legal framework of international commercial arbitration. It then deals with jurisdiction of arbitration tribunals and certain procedural issues arising in arbitration practice. The module ends with the setting aside and recognition and enforcement of arbitral awards. 

The course focuses mainly on English law of arbitration which is put in comparative perspective and compared and contrasted especially with the UNCITRAL Model Law on International Commercial Arbitration.

This module aims to:

  • develop a knowledge and understanding of principles and main rules of international commercial arbitration
  • develop the students' ability to identify and resolve main issues arising in arbitration practice
  • develop an understanding of the place that international commercial arbitration occupies in commercial practice and how it relates to other dispute resolution mechanisms, especially international commercial litigation
 
International Relations Law of the EU

This module is concerned with the EU's attempts to assert its international identity.

Subjects being examined will include:

  • the issue of competence and effectiveness of the EU as a global actor
  • the Common Commercial Policy
  • the EU/WTO relationship
  • international development
  • human rights conditions in trade/development agreements
  • common foreign and security policy
  • the EU as a 'regional superpower'

This module aims to:

  • develop knowledge and understanding of a specialised and constantly evolving area of European Law
 
Minorities and International Human Rights

The module aims to provide a thorough grounding in the application of international law standards to minorities and indigenous peoples. There is a strong focus on the decisions of international and European courts and international human rights bodies.

This module aims to:

  • provide students with a thorough grounding in the application of international human rights law standards to minorities and indigenous peoples
  • develop the students' analytical skills in relation of the function, scope and operation of the international human rights standards relevant to minorities and its likely future development
  • develop critical interpretations of international and European human rights jurisprudence relating to minorities and indigenous peoples
 
Public Procurement in EU and International Trade Law

This module examines the regulation of government procurement at international level for the purpose of opening up government markets to free trade.

This module aims to:

  • provide a detailed examination of the system under EU Law, which has provided a model for other international systems
  • provide a detailed examination of government procurement regulation in the WTO
 
Religion and International Human Rights

The module aims to provide a thorough grounding in the application of international law standards to religion. There is a strong focus on the decisions of international and European courts and international human rights bodies.

This module aims to:

  • provide students with a thorough grounding in the application of international human rights law standards to religions and religious believers
 

 

The modules we offer are inspired by the research interests of our staff and as a result may change for reasons of, for example, research developments or legislation changes. This list is an example of typical modules we offer, not a definitive list.

 
 

Funding

The School of Law advertises a variety of funding opportunities each year, please see the funding opportunities webpage for further information.

There is also funding information on the Graduate School website.

International and EU students

The University of Nottingham offers a range of masters scholarships for international and EU students from a wide variety of countries and areas of study.

Applicants must receive an offer of study before applying for our scholarships. Applications for 2017 entry scholarships will open in late 2016. Please note the closing dates of any scholarships you are interested in and make sure you submit your masters course application in good time so that you have the opportunity to apply for them.

The International Office also provides information and advice for international and EU students on financing your degree, living costs, external sources of funding and working during your studies.

Find out more on our scholarships, fees and finance webpages for international applicants.

 
 

Careers

Our postgraduate students move into an extraordinarily wide range of careers. Many graduates either go into the legal profession or return to their previous legal careers with their experience and prospects enhanced by their experiences on the course. A large number also work with NGOs, or return to their countries with the relevant skills to help add to the future development of that country.

A selection of graduates progress onto our PhD programme each year, in order to progress their academic career. These students often choose to stay at The University of Nottingham beyond their doctorate, with a number of our current academics having completed both the LLM or Masters and PhD programmes with us before becoming members of staff.

Average starting salary and career progression

In 2015, 93% of postgraduates in the School of Law who were available for employment had secured work or further study within six months of graduation. The average starting salary was £27,031 with the highest being £40,800.*

* Known destinations of full-time home higher degree postgraduates 2014/15. Salaries are calculated based on those in full-time paid employment within the UK.

Career prospects and employability

The acquisition of a masters degree demonstrates a high level of knowledge in a specific field. Whether you are using it to enhance your employability, as preparation for further academic research or as a means of vocational training, you may benefit from careers advice as to how you can use your new found skills to their full potential.

Our Careers and Employability Service will help you do this, working with you to explore your options and inviting you to attend recruitment events where you can meet potential employers, as well as suggesting further development opportunities, such as relevant work experience placements and skills workshops.

 
 
 
Get in touch
+44 (0)115 951 5559

Contact

School of Law
Law and Social Sciences Building
The University of Nottingham
University Park
Nottingham
NG7 2RD

 Social Science videos

Social Science videos

 
 

The Enquiry Centre

The University of Nottingham
King's Meadow Campus
Lenton Lane
Nottingham, NG7 2NR

t: +44 (0) 115 951 5559
f: +44 (0) 115 951 5812
w: Frequently asked questions
Make an enquiry