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Andreas Bieler

Professor of Political Economy, Faculty of Social Sciences

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Biography

Andreas Bieler is Professor of Political Economy and Fellow of the Centre for the Study of Social and Global Justice. His general expertise is in the area of International Relations/International Political Economy theories and the analysis of European integration as well as resistance to neo-liberal globalisation with a particular emphasis on the possible role of trade unions and labour movements understood in a broad sense.

For downloadable samples of his work, please click here.

He runs the blog on Trade unions and global restructuring, providing analytical commentary on labour movements and their attempts to resist exploitation in today's neo-liberal, global capitalism.

Administrative roles:

Teaching Summary

Andreas Bieler has taught modules on European integration, European political economy, Comparative European Politics, International Political Economy as well as Theories of International Relations… read more

Research Summary

Prof. Bieler's main research interest deals with the global dynamics of capitalism, neo-liberal globalisation and the possibilities for resistance. Particular emphasis is placed on the potential role… read more

Recent Publications

Ph.D. supervision

I am interested in supervising students who want to work in the following areas:

  • Resistance to neo-liberal globalisation;
  • Trade unions and transnational solidarity;
  • European integration and political economy;
  • Historical materialist IR theory;

Ph.D. students

Supervision as first supervisor of successfully completed Ph.D. theses

Hang Chao - 'Regional Integration in Latin America: Argentina, Brazil and the case of Mercosur' (completed in November 2007);

Phoebe Moore - 'South Korea's Passive Revolution: Vocational Training, Global Restructuring and the Struggle for Hegemony' (completed in December 2004);

Peter Sandby-Thomas - 'The Legitimating Logic of Stability: Analysing the CCP's Stability Discourse' (completed in May 2008);

Kostas Tzortzis - 'The development of a common education policy in the EU' (completed in October 2007).

Supervision as second supervisor of successfully completed Ph.D. theses

Javier Argomaniz - 'Post-9/11 European Union Counter-terrorism: Institutionalisation and Consistency' (completed in November 2008);

Chris Hesketh - 'Spaces of Capital/Spaces of Resistance: Mexico and the global political economy' (completed in November 2010).

Current Ph.D. students

Max Crook - Gramsci, hegemony and the move to the centre by the Western European mainstream left (registered full time since September 2010, first supervisor).

Ertan Erol - 'Capitalist spatiality in the periphery: regional integration projects in Mexico and Turkey' (registered full time since September 2008, first supervisor);

Anisa Santoso - 'Migrant Workers Policy Making in ASEAN: a Two Level Analysis on Key Workers Sending Countries' (registered full time since September 2008, second supervisor);

Cemal Burak Tansel - 'Rethinking State Formation in Turkey: A Historical Materialist Analysis' (registered full time since September 2011; second supervisor);

Elif Uzgoren - 'Globalisation, the European Union and Turkey: Rethinking the Struggle over Hegemony' (registered full time since September 2008, first supervisor).

Andreas Bieler has taught modules on European integration, European political economy, Comparative European Politics, International Political Economy as well as Theories of International Relations first as a graduate student at Warwick University (1997 and 1998), then for three years as a lecturer at Cambridge University (1998 - 2001), before joining the School of Politics and International Relations at Nottingham University in August 2001.

First Year BA Modules

  • Introduction to European Politics (module convenor and contribution of lectures, University of Nottingham).
  • Problems in Global Politics (module convenor and contribution of lectures, University of Nottingham).
  • Understanding Global Politics (contribution of lectures and seminars, University of Nottingham).
  • Analysis of Modern Politics (contribution of seminars, University of Cambridge).

Second Year BA Modules

  • New Developments in IR theory (module convenor, 1h lecture + 1h reading workshop + 1h seminar per week, University of Nottingham).
  • Making Sense of European Integration (module convenor, 1h lecture + 1h reading workshop per week, University of Nottingham).
  • IPE and Global Development (module convenor, 2h lecture + 1h seminar per week, University of Nottingham).
  • Theories of International Relations (contribution of seminars, University of Warwick).

Third Year BA Modules

  • The Impact of Globalisation: European national and regional responses to global structural change (module convenor, 2h lecture + 1h seminar per week, University of Nottingham).
  • West European Politics (contribution of lectures and seminars, University of Cambridge).

MA Modules

  • European Politics and Policy (module convenor, 1h lecture + 1h seminar per week, University of Cambridge and University of Nottingham).
  • International Political Economy (module convenor, 1h lecture + 1h seminar per week, University of Nottingham).
  • Social and Global Justice in Action (joint module convenor, 1h lecture + 2h student-led workshop per week, University of Nottingham).
  • Theories and Concepts in International Relations (module convenor, 1h lecture + 1h seminar per week, University of Nottingham).

Together with Adam D. Morton, I received the 2012/13 Award for Excellence in Teaching International Studies for this module by the British International Studies Association and the Higher Education Academy, UK.

Current Research

Prof. Bieler's main research interest deals with the global dynamics of capitalism, neo-liberal globalisation and the possibilities for resistance. Particular emphasis is placed on the potential role of trade unions in resistance to restructuring, the possibilities for labour movements more generally to establish links of transnational solidarity across borders, as well as theoretical discussions of how these struggles can be conceptualised from a historical materialist perspective. Moreover, he has analysed struggles over the future European Union model of capitalism and the possibilities of national economic-political models different from a neo-liberal, Anglo-American model of capitalism.

Current research projects

1. Small European States in the Global Economy: Divergence or Convergence?

In 1985, Peter Katzenstein published his seminal work Small States in World Markets. His main argument was that small Western European countries pursued a similar economic strategy of combining international liberalisation with domestic compensation. The main purpose of this research project is to provide a comparative assessment of small European states in today's global economy and to assess whether they continue to have a distinctive approach of how to respond to economic change or whether they too have converged around a neo-liberal economic-political model. The project will include an analysis of Austria, Belgium, Estonia, Finland, Ireland, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Slovenia, Sweden and Switzerland.

2. 'Global Capitalism, Class Struggle and World Order: Rethinking Historical Materialism' (together with Adam David Morton):

Andreas Bieler and Adam David Morton are currently working towards a new book that aims to rethink the contributions of historical materialism to understanding global capitalism in terms of transnational restructuring and the centrality of class struggle in constituting and contesting world order.

3. Trade unions, free trade and the problem of transnational solidarity:

Resistance against free trade agreements based on an expanded trade agenda including issues related to intellectual property rights, trade in services and trade related investment measures, has increased since the demonstrations at the WTO ministerial conference in Seattle in 1999. While the WTO Doha negotiations have broken down, the EU and USA are increasingly engaged in bilateral free trade agreements building upon this expanded trade agenda.

Free trade strategies have more and more become a problem for the international labour movement. While trade unions in the North especially in manufacturing have supported free trade agreements to secure export markets for their companies, trade unions in the Global South oppose these agreements, since they often imply deindustrialisation.

The purpose of this project is to understand better the dynamics underlying free trade as well as explore possibilities for transnational solidarity. Methodologically, academics, trade union researchers and social movement activists will meet in a two-day workshop on 2 and 3 December 2011 at the Centre for the Study of Social and Global Justice to discuss these issues in detail.

School of Politics and International Relations

Law and Social Sciences Building
University of Nottingham
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Nottingham, NG7 2RD

telephone: +44 (0)115 951 4862
fax: +44 (0)115 951 4859
email: politics-enquiries@nottingham.ac.uk