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Ben Webb

Associate Professor, Faculty of Science

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Biography

Ben Webb is an Associate Professor of Visual Neuroscience in the School of Psychology at The University of Nottingham. Between 2008-2013, he was a Wellcome Trust Research Career Development Fellow. Between 2006-2008, he was a Leverhulme Trust Early Career Fellow. He spent two years as a visiting post-doctoral fellow at the Center for Neural Science, New York University. His PhD, funded by a Wellcome Trust Prize PhD Studentship, was awarded in 2003 from The University of Nottingham. He was awarded an MSc in Neuroscience from University of Oxford and BSc in Psychology from University of London, Goldsmiths College.

Expertise Summary

Dr Webb investigates how the brain produces visual perception. The latest knowledge on brain function is used to design clinical interventions that can recover sight loss during abnormal development, ageing, and after acquired brain damage.

Teaching Summary

Dr Webb teaches undergraduate and postgraduate modules on the visual brain, brain computation and professional skills for PhD students. He welcomes enquiries from undergraduate project students and… read more

Research Summary

Dr Webb's lab investigates how the eye and brain enable visual perception. They are particularly interested in understanding the computations performed by the visual brain and how different visual… read more

Recent Publications

Dr Webb teaches undergraduate and postgraduate modules on the visual brain, brain computation and professional skills for PhD students. He welcomes enquiries from undergraduate project students and postgraduate students who are interested in any area of visual neuroscience or rehabilitation of sight loss, including amblyopia ('lazy eye') and age-related sight loss.

Current Research

Dr Webb's lab investigates how the eye and brain enable visual perception. They are particularly interested in understanding the computations performed by the visual brain and how different visual experiences shape visual perception. They use the knowledge gleaned from basic visual neuroscience experiments to inform the design of new clinical interventions for recovering sight loss acquired during childhood, in older adults and after a stroke.

School of Psychology

University Park
The University of Nottingham
Nottingham, NG7 2RD

For all enquires please visit:
www.nottingham.ac.uk/enquire