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Martyn Quigley

ESRC DTC PhD Student, Faculty of Science

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Biography

I am currently completing a + 3 Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) funded PhD in the Behavioural Neuroscience group in the School of Psychology. Before this I worked as an International Policy Officer in the ESRC, after spending time in their Knowledge Exchange Group and Evaluation and Analysis Team. Prior to this I completed an M.Sc. in Research Methods in Psychology (Distinction).

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Teaching Summary

C82MPR: Practical Methods - I currently mark and demonstrate on this second year module. In this module, students are tasked with running a "blocking" experiment (see Haselgrove & Evans, 2010),… read more

Research Summary

Outcome Predictability

Understanding how organisms learn is a topic of central interest to psychologists. One approach to understanding learning is provided by associative theories of learning. This approach suggests that when one event reliably predicts another event, a link will be established between them - so that when the first event is presented a representation of the second is triggered.

A core prediction of these theories is that if a cue (let's call it 'A') is established as a reliable predictor of an outcome (e.g. 'X'), then attention to Cue A will be enhanced. This will have the consequence of ensuring that Cue A is preferentially selected for learning in a new setting or 'context'. For instance, if the consumption of a particular food produces an adverse reaction [e.g. sickness], attention will be heightened toward this food when presented with it subsequently in a different context.

However, these theories state that how well-predicted an outcome has been in the past, has no influence on future learning involving that outcome. This asymmetry within these models is interesting. If a cue's predictability influences subsequent learning, could the same be true for outcomes? The studies we are currently conducting investigate this possibility. The results from these studies will help us understand how people learn associations between events, and thus gain a greater insight into the mechanisms which underpin learning in organisms.

Psychosis and Attention & Learning

Currently, I am also involved in projects investigating the role of learning and attention in people who have experienced psychosis, which has led to working with individuals who have been diagnosed with Schizophrenia. This project seeks to investigate the links between learning and attentional problems, and symptoms of schizophrenia. Understanding, the type of links between these phenomena and schizophrenia, will help us understand how to effectively develop psychological or pharmacological treatments.

Collaborators: Dr Kiri Granger (Senior Scientist, Cambridge Cognition), Dr Paula Moran (University of Nottingham), Dr Mark Haselgrove (University of Nottingham).

Recent Publications

  • QUIGLEY, M. C., EATHERINGTON, C. J. and HASELGROVE, M., 2017. Learned Changes in Outcome Processing. The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology. (In Press.)
  • QUIGLEY, M. and REED, P., 2017. Over-selective Responding in a Diagnostic Judgment Task. Applied Cognitive Psychology.

C82MPR: Practical Methods - I currently mark and demonstrate on this second year module. In this module, students are tasked with running a "blocking" experiment (see Haselgrove & Evans, 2010), and preparing a lab report discussing the results of their experiment.

Future Research

I am interested in understanding the mechanisms which underpin learning in a whole manner of circumstances, and how these can be linked to applied settings (e.g. educational and medical settings). I am also interested in the philosophy of science and how this relates to psychology and the replication crisis.

  • QUIGLEY, M. C., EATHERINGTON, C. J. and HASELGROVE, M., 2017. Learned Changes in Outcome Processing. The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology. (In Press.)
  • QUIGLEY, M. and REED, P., 2017. Over-selective Responding in a Diagnostic Judgment Task. Applied Cognitive Psychology.

School of Psychology

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The University of Nottingham
Nottingham, NG7 2RD

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