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Nicholas Holmes

Assistant Professor, Faculty of Science

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Biography

After degrees in Manchester and Oxford, I conducted postdoctoral research in Lyon, France, and Jerusalem, Israel, then took up a Lectureship at Reading in 2009. I moved to Nottingham in April 2015. I run The Hand Laboratory.

Expertise Summary

I study the generation and control of hand movements, as well as somatosensory perception, in adults and children with and without movement disorders. I use brain stimulation, brain imaging, motion tracking, and electrophysiological methods. I run The Hand Laboratory (http://neurobiography.info/HandLab.php).

Teaching Summary

I teach practical classes on somatosensory perception, and a third year course on Social Neuroscience - how the brain processes information about other people's faces, bodies, and movements, and… read more

Research Summary

I study how the brain controls the hands while you are reaching and grasping simple, everyday objects like a table-tennis ball. Some kinds of hand movements can be performed extremely quickly, almost… read more

I teach practical classes on somatosensory perception, and a third year course on Social Neuroscience - how the brain processes information about other people's faces, bodies, and movements, and whether the brain processes information about the 'self' and 'other' people differently. I can supervise final year undergraduate, masters, and doctoral projects on somatosensory perception and/or the control of movement in adults and/or children.

Current Research

I study how the brain controls the hands while you are reaching and grasping simple, everyday objects like a table-tennis ball. Some kinds of hand movements can be performed extremely quickly, almost without thought, and often when the target of our movement suddenly and unexpectedly changes - these are the kinds of movements I study. A second strand of my research examines how the brain processes information coming from the hands, in particular simple vibrations on the fingertips. By stimulating the brain and peripheral nerves with an electromagnet, we can work out exactly where and when the brain is processing the vibrations.

Past Research

My PhD examined how the brain processes lights and touches felt on or near the hands. The brain seems to treat objects close to the body (say, within 30cm of your skin) quite differently to objects that are further away. This idea of 'personal space' leads to many predictions about how the brain might process visual and tactile stimuli on and near the skin. My PhD used behavioural and neuroimaging methods to test these predictions.

School of Psychology

University Park
The University of Nottingham
Nottingham, NG7 2RD

For all enquires please visit:
www.nottingham.ac.uk/enquire