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School of Psychology
   
   
  
 

Roger Newport

Associate Professor, Faculty of Science

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Expertise Summary

My main area of expertise is in sensorimotor integration and the relative contributions of vision and touch to human perception and action. Experimental procedures that I am familiar with cover all aspects of upper limb movement ranging from haptic matching and grip force to the attribution of movement agency. I have studied these for a number of years in both healthy controls and neurologically impaired individuals - particularly those with visuospatial disorders. I use a variety of techniques - including transcranial magnetic stimulation, grip force analysis other psychophysical measures - but my primary tool is the kinematic analysis of human movement using both optical and electromagnetic recording techniques.

Research Summary

My research primarily focuses on the way the human brainputs together information from vision and touch in order to plan and carry outaccurate and efficient reaching movements. Such sensorimotor… read more

Current Research

My research primarily focuses on the way the human brainputs together information from vision and touch in order to plan and carry outaccurate and efficient reaching movements. Such sensorimotor integration can bemanipulated in a number of ways. The main methods that I use include opticaldisplacing prism goggles, virtual/distorted visual feedback, mechanicalperturbation and tendon vibration. Precise movement characteristics can bemeasured very accurately using a variety of visual, robotic and electromagneticmotion tracking systems in addition to measurements obtained from eye trackers,grip force transducers and other psychophysical measurement devices. Inaddition to measuring the performance of healthy control subjects, I also investigatereaching and perceptual deficits that have arisen as a result of brain damage.Such neuropsychological experiments are extremely useful as they can givevaluable insight into the brain mechanisms that control normal behaviour, aswell as providing clues as to potential techniques for rehabilitation.

Future Research

I have recently developed a system for fooling you into thinking that your left hand is your right hand and vice versa. It can even give the impression that the hands are crossed when they are not or that you are being touched when you are not. This system has potential for investigating any of the following research areas: the mirror neuron system, self-other agency attribution, sensorimotor integration, patient rehabilitation, motor control and size-weight illusions.

School of Psychology

University Park
The University of Nottingham
Nottingham, NG7 2RD

telephone: +44 (0) 115 951 5361
fax: +44 (0) 115 951 5324
email: psychology-enquiries@nottingham.ac.uk