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Timothy Ledgeway

Professor of Vision Research, Faculty of Science

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Biography

Expertise Summary

Motion Perception

Objects move and we as observers are also contantly moving our eyes, heads and bodies when interacting with our environments. This provides a rich source of visual information that can be exploited to perform many important functions (e.g. predict the future locations of animated objects in the world, break camouflage, reveal three-dimensional scene structure and aid navigation). My research interests include: Models of first-order and second-order motion detection; the relationship between psychophysical performance and the properties of visual cortical areas; feature-based theories of motion perception; speed perception; aftereffects of adaptation to motion; the integration of local velocity signals into global motion percepts.

Spatial Vision

My research in this area is directed at understanding the processes by which the outputs of sensors early in the visual pathways are combined in order to perform biologically-relevant tasks such as segmenting the image into adjacent regions, boundaries and objects. Specific interests include: the rules governing the manner in which local visual cues (e.g. spatial orientation and motion) are linked across space to extract elongated contours; why local textural differences, unlike equivalent luminance cues, are ineffective at disambiguating simple spatial contours; the anomalous processing deficits exhibited by amblyopic observers on tasks involving spatial integration.

Stereopsis and binocular vision

My research in this field focuses on how the visual system extracts information about the three-dimensional spatial structure of the environment by virtue of viewing the world simultaneously from two slightly different vantage points (i.e. with two horizontally-separated eyes). Interests include: the role of vertical disparity and vergence cues in scaling judgments of relative depth, surface shape, and size; vergence eye movements; retinal correspondence and the relationship between the theoretical (geometric) and empirical horopters; stereoscopic acuity and the depth information provided by absolute horizontal disparities; shape from shading; curvature contrast effects.

Research Summary

Broadly speaking my research addresses the psychological, neural and computational mechanisms underlying our ability to perceive the visual world. I primarily use psychophysical (behavioural) methods… read more

Recent Publications

Current Research

Broadly speaking my research addresses the psychological, neural and computational mechanisms underlying our ability to perceive the visual world. I primarily use psychophysical (behavioural) methods to investigate vision, but other techniques include eye-movement recording, functional brain imaging (fMRI), modeling and electrophysiology. Currently my research interests fall into three main categories:

School of Psychology

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The University of Nottingham
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