CRAL
Centre for Research in Applied Linguistics
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Luke Collins

Teaching Associate in English Language, Faculty of Arts

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Biography

I am a teaching associate and researcher with the Centre for Research in Applied Linguistics (CRAL). I carry out research that examines discourse in the context of healthcare interventions and medical training; involves the profiling of professional discourse in the workplace and online; includes corpus-driven analyses of the climate change debate online. I teach across a number of modules in the school of English, covering discourse analysis and sociolinguistics. This includes business and organisational communication; intercultural communication; and applied linguistics in different (social) contexts.

Expertise Summary

My principal research interests lie in the field of corpus linguistics and discourse analysis. I am interested in applying concepts and methods of applied linguistics in new and emerging contexts, such as in the study of online discourse.

I have published on the application of corpus-driven discourse analysis in the context of healthcare interventions and in the study of user comments online in the Routledge book, Language, Corpus and Empowerment: Applications to deaf education, healthcare and online discourses. I am currently preparing a manuscript exploring and demonstrating how approaches in corpus linguistics can be applied to online forms of communication.

I have also conducted research on the reporting of social issues in the press, specifically in relation to antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and climate change.

Teaching Summary

My teaching draws on methods of applied linguistics, specifically discourse analysis and corpus linguistics and explores the multiplicity of discourse in society. I teach across a number of… read more

Research Summary

I am currently involved in work conducted as part of the 'Linguistic Profiling for Professionals' (LiPP) project in the Centre for Research in Applied Linguistics (CRAL). This is a consultancy… read more

Recent Publications

My teaching draws on methods of applied linguistics, specifically discourse analysis and corpus linguistics and explores the multiplicity of discourse in society. I teach across a number of undergraduate and postgraduate modules including supervising dissertations, demonstrating how applications of linguistic theory help to raise awareness of the ways in which individual and social identities are constructed. Undergraduate modules taught Academic Community Language and Context Language in Society Language and Feminism Discourses of Health and Work Sociolinguistics Essentials of English Postgraduate modules taught Business and Organisational Communication Previously: Intercultural Communication Distance Learning Intercultural Communication Language and Gender The Language of Compliance Discourse Analysis 1&2 Descriptive Linguistic Analysis

Current Research

I am currently involved in work conducted as part of the 'Linguistic Profiling for Professionals' (LiPP) project in the Centre for Research in Applied Linguistics (CRAL). This is a consultancy program that offers support for local SMEs and training in how best to communicate, both internally among staff and externally with customers.

In the study of professional discourse I use corpus-assisted methods of discourse analysis to profile the ways in which business leaders use language in meetings, presentations and social media to construct a business identity and to cultivate working relationships. Based on observations of their language practices, we gain a better understanding of naturally-occurring professional discourse, as well as recommending ways in which professionals can communicate more effectively. I am also working on creating a monograph that demonstrates how methods of corpus linguistics can be applied to online forms of communication. This has involved the completion of small case studies, exploring different forms of online communication including: mobile dating apps; online training courses; the social media of business profiles; and online user comments.

Past Research

I have previously worked on exploring the discourse of medical training simulations to examine the ways in which candidates develop their communicative skills in preparation for entering the workforce. Using methods of conversation analysis, we can assess the efficacy of training simulations in developing communicative behaviours, as well as identifying any differences between the training scenarios and 'real' healthcare encounters.

I am also examining the ways in which scientific discourse is understood by members of the public by looking specifically at how the issue of Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) is reported and the ways in which the media report scientific (un)certainties in relation to the climate change debate. Using corpus linguistics, I am studying the use of risk discourse and the use of analogy as ways of improving public understanding of science.

Future Research

I am working with HORIZON to explore the ways in which language researchers can develop methods that benefit from the wealth of digital information afforded by internet and Smartphone resources, whilst allowing participants to maintain anonymity and control what information about them is collected. More broadly, this will explore the ethical considerations of conducting research on internet data.

I am also working with colleagues in archaeology to explore the ways in which archaeological research is represented in the mass media, including how press releases are constructed by researchers and used by journalists to inform their publications. This work will consider how researchers can ensure that the key aspects of their work are reported as well as how such work fits within broader social issues such as migration and national identity.

Centre for Research in Applied Linguistics

The University of Nottingham
Nottingham
NG7 2RD

telephone: +44 (0) 115 951 5900
fax: +44 (0) 115 951 5924
email: cral@nottingham.ac.uk