Dairy Herd Health Group
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Reproduction

 

Maintaining good fertility is one of the key drivers of efficiency in dairy farming. By managing reproduction well, dairy farmers can maximise the amount of milk they produce while minimising requirement for additional inputs such as feed and energy. Understanding the factors which affect fertility in UK herds is critical to achieving this.

Current research

A major aim of the group is to maximise value derived from data which is routinely recorded by dairy farmers. This involves:

  • application of “big data” techniques to manipulate and integrate data from different and varied sources
  • analysis of this data using cutting-edge statistical techniques 
  • use of computer simulation models to evaluate relative importance of factors affecting fertility
  • development of decision support tools to help farmers use existing evidence better

Publications

  • HUDSON, C.D., BRADLEY, A.J., BREEN, J.E. and GREEN, M.J., 2015. Dairy herd mastitis and reproduction: using simulation to aid interpretation of results from discrete time survival analysis The Veterinary Journal. 204, 47-53
  • ARCHER, S. C., HUDSON, C. D. and GREEN, M. J., 2015. Use of stochastic simulation to evaluate the reduction in methane emissions and improvement in reproductive efficiency from routine hormonal interventions in dairy herds. PLOS ONE. 10(6): e0127846,
  • REMNANT JG, GREEN MJ, HUXLEY JN and HUDSON CD, 2014. Variation in the interservice intervals of dairy cows in the United Kingdom. Journal of Dairy Science. 98(2), 889-897
  • HUDSON, C.D., HUXLEY, J.N. and GREEN, M.J., 2014. Using Simulation to Interpret a Discrete Time Survival Model in a Complex Biological System: Fertility and Lameness in Dairy Cows PLoS ONE. 9(8), 103426
  • HUDSON, C.D., BRADLEY, A.J., BREEN, J.E. and GREEN, M.J., 2012. Associations between udder health and reproductive performance in United Kingdom dairy cows Journal of Dairy Science. 95(7), 3683-3697
 

 

 

 

Dairy Herd Health Group

The University of Nottingham
School of Veterinary Medicine and Science
Sutton Bonington Campus, Leicestershire, LE12 5RD


telephone: +44 (0) 115 951 6116
email: Email our Research Theme Leader