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D.H. Lawrence Research Centre
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James Moran

Professor of Modern English Literature and Drama, Faculty of Arts

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Expertise Summary

MA (Cambridge), PhD (Cambridge)

Teaching Summary

I am currently a member of the research board of Nottingham University, and I am the lead for one of the university's five 'Global Research Themes', that of 'Cultures and Communication'. I am also… read more

Research Summary

My research is primarily concerned with modern anglophone literature, and I have a particular interest in the theatre of twentieth-century Ireland and Britain.

I am currently editing a book of George Bernard Shaw's shorter plays for publication by Oxford University Press in 2021. I am also being funded by the AHRC's 'Centre for Hidden Histories' to do some interdisciplinary research (with the art historian Fintan Cullen) into the memorialising of the British military figures who fought in the Easter Rising of 1916. And I am completing a monograph about the way that high-modernist writers engaged with the practical world of theatre-making during the early years of the twentieth century.

Recent Publications

  • MORAN, JAMES, ed., 2021. George Bernard Shaw, Playlets. Oxford University Press. (In Press.)
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2018. Theatre. In: ANDREW HARRISON, ed., D.H. Lawrence in Context. Cambridge University Press. (In Press.)
  • MORAN, JAMES and CULLEN, FINTAN, 2018. 'The Sherwood Foresters of 1916: Memories and Monuments'. Irish Studies Review. 26(4), (In Press.)
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2017. Class During the Irish Revolution. In: PIERSE, MICHAEL, ed., A History of Irish Working-Class Writing. Cambridge University Press. 153-67

I have had the pleasure of supervising the work of a number of excellent PhD students and would welcome applications from those whose interests broadly intersect with my own. My former research students include Sam Haddow (lecturer in modern and contemporary drama, University of St Andrews), Soudabeh Ananisarab (lecturer in drama, Birmingham City University), and Joseph Anderton (teaching fellow in English literature, University of Leicester).

I am currently a member of the research board of Nottingham University, and I am the lead for one of the university's five 'Global Research Themes', that of 'Cultures and Communication'. I am also Public Engagement lead for the Faculty of Arts; I chair the university's City of Literature steering group; I am Senior Tutor in the School of English; and I am lucky enough to teach on a wide range of undergraduate and postgraduate modules. In previous years, I have also acted as deputy-head of school, head of the drama section, and head of drama and creative writing.

I am a recipient of the British Academy mid-career fellowship, an award that is given 'to support outstanding individual researchers with excellent research proposals', and I have also been awarded the Philip Leverhulme prize. In addition, I have been a visiting fellow at the National University of Ireland, Galway, and have acted as external programme reviewer for Performing Arts at Edge Hill University and at Sligo IT. I am currently a member of the AHRC peer-review college as well as member of the wider board of Nottingham UNESCO City of Literature.

Outside the academy, I enjoy giving lectures and seminars for a range of different organisations, including the Royal National Theatre, where I've delivered sessions with figures including the actor Anne-Marie Duff, playwright Enda Walsh, theatre director Wayne Jordan, and screenwriter William Ivory.

I am also regularly involved with the broadcast media: I've appeared, for example, on episodes of BBC TV's Who Do You Think You Are? with Minnie Driver and with Ian McKellen, and my most longstanding broadcasting commitment is the monthly book-review feature on BBC Radio Nottingham that I've been delivering since 2010.

Past Research

One of the main strands of my research has been an exploration of how revolutionary politics and dramatic literature interact. My first book, Staging the Easter Rising (2005), charts the ways in which Irish insurrectionism (and the legacies of insurrectionism) might be affected by the public playhouse. I have also edited a volume of plays by political radicals such as Thomas MacDonagh and James Connolly (Four Irish Rebel Plays, 2007); and in 2013 I published a book called The Theatre of Seán O'Casey.

A second aspect of my work has revolved around the evolving literary cultures of the English midlands. My book The Theatre of D.H. Lawrence (2015) focuses upon issues of regionalism and class, and my earlier book Irish Birmingham: A History (2010) traces a long cultural history of one of the major cities in the area from the perspective of one of the largest minority groups. I was flattered that part of the latter book was fictionalised by the Costa-prize-winning writer Catherine O'Flynn in her fine novel Mr Lynch's Holiday (2013).

My interest in locations such as Birmingham, Nottingham and Dublin also led me to theorise notions of literary modernism from an archipelagic perspective, and I developed some of these concerns in a co-edited volume that I put together with Neal Alexander entitled Regional Modernisms (2013).

  • MORAN, JAMES, ed., 2021. George Bernard Shaw, Playlets. Oxford University Press. (In Press.)
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2018. Theatre. In: ANDREW HARRISON, ed., D.H. Lawrence in Context. Cambridge University Press. (In Press.)
  • MORAN, JAMES and CULLEN, FINTAN, 2018. 'The Sherwood Foresters of 1916: Memories and Monuments'. Irish Studies Review. 26(4), (In Press.)
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2017. Class During the Irish Revolution. In: PIERSE, MICHAEL, ed., A History of Irish Working-Class Writing. Cambridge University Press. 153-67
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2017. Art as Medication: Sara Baume's 'A Line Made By Walking'. The Tablet. 8 April 2017, 19
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2017. A Review of "Irish Drama, Modernity and the Passion Play". International Yeats Studies. 2(1), 64-69
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2016. Irish Theatre in Britain. In: MORASH, CHRISTOPHER and GRENE, NICHOLAS, eds., The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish Theatre. Oxford University Press. 607-622
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2016. Competing Narratives. The Irish Review. 51, 116-18
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2016. Lawyers at the Gate. Times Literary Supplement. 4 March, 31
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2016. A Terrible Beauty. Breac: A Digital Journal of Irish Studies.
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2016. More Books: Ireland. TDR: The Drama Review. 60(2), 169-71
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2016. Irish Gothic: Paraic O'Donnell's 'The Maker of Swans'. The Tablet. 16 April, 19
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2016. The Rebel Countess. Times Literary Supplement. 22 April, 13
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2016. We Know Nothing. Dublin Review of Books.
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2016. Angel Delight: Patrick Pearse and Modernist Experiment. In: RÓISÍN NÍ GHAIRBHÍ and EUGENE MCNULTY, eds., Patrick Pearse and the Theatre. Four Courts Press.
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2016. Review of R.F. Foster's 'Vivid Faces' [reprint of article originally published in Breac journal] Reading Ireland: The Little Magazine. 2(1), 48-51
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2016. Irish Gothic: Conor O'Callaghan's 'Nothing on Earth'. The Tablet. 17 September, 19
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2016. Uphill Battles. Dublin Review of Books.
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2016. 'Yours Briefly': The Letters of Samuel Beckett, 1966-1989. The Tablet. 19 November, 19
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2016. Lawrence's Plays on the Stage: An Evolution from 2009 to 2016. JDHLS: Journal of D.H. Lawrence Studies. 4(2), 121-37
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2015. The Theatre of D.H. Lawrence. Bloomsbury.
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2015. Seán O'Casey. In: Oxford Bibliographies in British and Irish Literature. Oxford University Press.
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2015. D.H. Lawrence. In: Oxford Bibliographies in British and Irish Literature. Oxford University Press.
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2015. The Enemies Within. Dublin Review of Books.
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2015. Review of 'The Urban Plays of the Early Abbey Theatre'. Studies in Theatre and Performance.
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2015. 1916: A British Soldier's Family Reunion and Death in Dublin. The Irish Times. 6 April, 11
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2015. 'Writers Inspired'. The Tablet. 17 January, 16-17
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2015. Laughing Matters: 'Quite a Good Time to be Born' by David Lodge. Dublin Review of Books.
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2015. Novelist on the Money: Paul Murray's 'The Mark and the Void'. The Tablet. 1 August, 25
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2015. Taking things, literally: John Banville's 'The Blue Guitar'. The Tablet. 21 November, 23
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2015. Down the pit in Dogville. Times Literary Supplement. 20 November, 17
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2014. 'Introduction'. In: The Silver Tassie, Sean O'Casey. Faber. v-ix
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2014. Outsider-Insider. The Tablet. (15 March), 12-14
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2014. Uncomfortably Complicit: Audrey Magee's 'The Undertaking'. The Tablet. (5 April), 19
  • MORAN, JAMES., 2014. Sean O'Casey and 'The Silver Tassie'. The Silver Tassie Programme - Royal National Theatre. 30-32
  • MORAN, JAMES., 2014. Uneasy Homecoming: Paul Lynch's 'The Black Snow'. The Tablet. (24 May), 21
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2014. Review of Josephine Donovan, European Local-Color Literature. Comparative Critical Studies. 11(2-3), 365-68
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2014. London Calling. The Irish Review. Summer 2014(48), 106-110
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2014. Review of 'To Bodies Gone: The Theatre of Peter Gill'. Studies in Theatre and Performance.
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2014. God and Godot. The Tablet. (20 Dec), 18-19
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2014. Programme Notes, 'Philadelphia, Here I Come!' Lyric Theatre Belfast. 11
  • MORAN, J., 2013. The theatre of Seán O'Casey Bloomsbury.
  • ALEXANDER, NEAL and MORAN, JAMES, eds., 2013. Regional Modernisms. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.
  • MORAN, J., 2013. Pound, Yeats, and the regional repertory theatres. In: ALEXANDER, N. and MORAN, J., eds., Regional modernisms Edinburgh University Press. 83-103
  • ALEXANDER, NEAL and MORAN, JAMES, 2013. Introduction. In: ALEXANDER, NEAL and MORAN, JAMES, eds., Regional Modernisms. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2013. Unstable Identities. Times Literary Supplement. (8 February), 18
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2013. Matthew Bevis's 'Comedy: A Very Short Introduction'. Times Literary Supplement. (8 February), 31
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2013. Re-Joyce: Ulysses. The Tablet. (9 February), 21
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2013. 'Levels of Life' by Julian Barnes. The Tablet. (27 April), 18
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2013. Piece by Piece Process: Colum McCann's 'TransAtlantic'. The Tablet. (6 July), 20
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2013. Between Bodies: The Plays of Samuel Beckett. Times Literary Supplement. (16 August), 30
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2013. Book Central. Dublin Review of Books.
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2013. A Place in the Sun. Dublin Review of Books.
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2013. Borstal Boy. 'Brendan at the Chelsea' Programme - Lyric Theatre Belfast. 11
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2013. Innocent's Progress. The Tablet. (21 December), 40
  • MORAN, JAMES., 2013. Apertures. Irish Review. 47, 143-45
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2012. Fenland Dystopia: Jon McGregor's 'This Isn't The Sort Of Thing That Happens To Someone Like You'. The Tablet. 266(18 February), 22
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2012. Traitor for our Time: Mario Vargas Llosa's 'The Dream of the Celt'. The Tablet. 266(30 June), 30
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2012. Ireland Onstage at the Birmingham Repertory Theatre. In: NICHOLAS GRENE and PATRICK LONERGAN, eds., Irish Drama: Local and Global Perspectives. Dublin: Carysfort Press. 65-80
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2012. Spokesinger: Marilynn Richtarik's 'Stewart Parker: A Life'. Times Literary Supplement. 5724 (14 December), 31
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2012. Avon Calling: the Influence of Frank Benson on the Irish Theatre. Irish University Review. 42(2), 217-35
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2012. Spoiled by Joyce. The Tablet. 266 (25 August), 20
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2012. Given a Voice: Colm Tóibín’s 'The Testament of Mary'. The Tablet. 266 (10 November), 26
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2012. Moving Pictures in the Hallway: Dramatising the Autobiographies of Seán O'Casey. Irish Studies Review. 20(4), 389-406
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2012. The Glory and the Shame. The Plough and the Stars: Abbey Theatre Programme. 6-8
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2012. Mr Nice Guy? Guardian Review. 5 May, 15
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2011. Inglorious Death: Sebastian Barry's 'On Canaan's Side'. The Tablet. 265(8 October), 27
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2011. Questions of Trust. The Tablet. 265(21 May), 22
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2011. Rosie Garner, The Rain Diaries. Times Literary Supplement. 5670 (2 December), 27
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2010. Review of 'A History of the Media in Ireland'. Studies in Theatre and Performance. 30(3), 364-67
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2010. Smart, Uncertain. The Tablet. 264(18 September), 33
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2010. 'Hegemony and Fantasy' Review. Theatre Research International. 79-80
  • MORAN, J., 2010. Irish Birmingham: a history Liverpool University Press.
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2010. Concrete Proof. Dublin Review of Books.
  • MORAN, J., 2010. Meditations in time of civil war: 'Back to Methuselah' and 'Saint Joan' in production, 1919–1924 Shaw: The Annual of Bernard Shaw Studies. 30(1), 147-160
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2009. Gift of the Ambiguous Gab. The Tablet. 263(25 July), 10-11
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2009. Review of 'Modernism, Drama, and the Audience for Irish Spectacle'. Modern Drama. 52(1), 138-140
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2008. Green Man. Times Literary Supplement. 5493(11 July), 24
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2008. Swallowed by the Shopping Centre. Dublin Review of Books.
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2008. Ireland in the Heart of England. The Tablet. 262(15 March), 14-15
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2008. New York Diary: A Night at the Theatre. Dublin Review of Books.
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2008. Making theatre in Northern Ireland. Theatre Research International. 33(01), 101-103
  • MORAN, JAMES, ed., 2007. Four Irish Rebel Plays. Dublin : Irish Academic Press.
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2006. 'The Field Day Anthology' and the impossibility of Roger Casement.. In: THOMPSON, H., ed., The current debate about the Irish literary canon: essays reassessing 'The Field Day Anthology of Irish Writing'. Lewiston: Edwin Mellen Press. 219-233
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2006. Arms and the churchman. The Tablet. 260(11 March), 20-21
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2005. Staging the Easter Rising: 1916 as Theatre. Cork: Cork University Press.
  • MORAN, JAMES, 2004. Being Sir Rogered: George Bernard Shaw and the Irish rebel. In: ALEXANDER, N., MURPHY, S. and OAKMAN, A., eds., To the other shore: cross-currents in Irish and Scottish Studies. Belfast: Cló Ollscoil na Banríona. 128-136

Dr Andrew Harrison

Centre for Regional Literature and Culture

Trent Building
University of Nottingham
University Park
Nottingham, NG7 2RD

telephone: +44 (0) 115 846 6456
fax: +44 (0) 115 951 5924
email: andrew.harrison@nottingham.ac.uk