Obstetrics & Gynaecology
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Peter Marsters

Assistant Professor in Molecular Cell Biology/Course Director, MMedSc in Assisted Reproduction Technology,

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Biography

1995 BSc in Biochemistry and Genetics, University of Nottingham.

2000 PhD in Molecular Genetics (Division of Clinical Chemistry), University of Nottingham.

2010 MA in Higher Education, University of Nottingham.

2011 PGCHE, University of Nottingham.

2011 Fellow of Higher Education Academy (FHEA)

Teaching Summary

Acting Director, MMedSci in Assisted Reproduction Technology.

Module convener and lecturer, MMedSci in Assisted Reproduction Technology.

Lecturer, MSc in Molecular Diagnostics.

Principal Supervisor for Post-Doc.

Principal Supervisor for PhD and and Masters students.

Taught on MMedSci in Assisted Reproduction Technology since 1999, in Pre-implantation Genetic Diagnostics (PGD), Biomolecular analysis techniques for diagnostics and research, Reproductive Anatomy, Cell-signalling and Molecular Cell Biology, as well as significant input in foundation courses and student support.

Research Summary

Since 1999 I have utilised my molecular genetics and biochemistry background to develop research interests in the field of reproductive biology. I am particularly interested in widening the current… read more

Selected Publications

Current Research

Since 1999 I have utilised my molecular genetics and biochemistry background to develop research interests in the field of reproductive biology. I am particularly interested in widening the current understanding of the major events involved in ovarian folliculogenesis including; oocyte maturation, follicular somatic cell proliferation and differentiation, steroidogenesis, dominant follicle selection and ovulation, and follicle atresia. Currently my work in this field principally focuses on two crucial stimulatory systems. The first of these is the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) family of ligands and receptors, and their cellular response cascades. These have important roles during follicular development and oocyte maturation. In particular the BMP receptor type 1B (BMPR1B) appears to have great functional significance. A naturally occurring mutation in this gene designated 'FecB' has been demonstrated to increase fecundity in a herd of merino sheep. I am currently investigating the molecular basis for this phenomenon utilising a number of different approaches, involving 'knock-out' systems and 'functional studies'. It is expected that this will also lead to a better understanding of the normal cellular responses to BMP stimulation. The second stimulatory system that I am greatly interested in is hypoxia and its roles in developing antral follicles. It is now well documented that hypoxic conditions are an essential prerequisite of normal antral follicle development and may be crucial to ovulation. However the underlying molecular bases of the cellular responses to hypoxia remain poorly understood. I have modified a specialised cell culture system for studying physiological hypoxia in follicular somatic cell populations.

Obstetrics & Gynaecology

School of Medicine
The University of Nottingham
Queen's Medical Centre, D Floor, East Block
Nottingham, NG7 2UH


telephone: +44 (0) 115 823 1000
email:anne.whitchurch@nottingham.ac.uk