Sports and Exercise Medicine
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Kim Edwards

Course Director, Sports and Exercise Medicine; Director of Postgraduate Education, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences

Contact

  • workRoom Room w/c1374, Academic Orthopeadics, Trauma and Sports Medicine, C Floor, West Block Queen's Medical Centre
    Queen's Medical Centre
    Nottingham
    NG7 2UH
    UK
  • work0115 823 1114

Biography

Kim is a senior educator and epidemiologist (Associate Professor) in Academic Orthopaedics, Trauma and Sports Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham. She is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

She is Director of postgraduate education for the School of Medicine and Course Director for two masters courses in the School: MSc Sports and Exercise Medicine and MSc Applied Sport and Exercise Medicine. This gives her a very broad knowledge of University processes, assessment and quality assurance of teaching and learning.

She has a strong interest in medical education research as well as investigating the relationships around physical activity, diet and environmental exposures and their association with chronic disease, such as osteoarthritis, cancer and obesity. She has extensive statistical modelling expertise.

Her background whilst highly numerate is not tradition. In brief: maths BSc(Hons); corporate banking career; MMedSci Human Nutrition; spatial epidemiology PhD; then increasingly senior academic roles (University of Leeds; University of Nottingham), teaching and leading research methods and medical statistics and sport and exercise nutrition. This holistic background affords both medical understanding and statistical experience and gives me a wide and a diverse set of skills to draw on for research and teaching.

She is the E-Editor for Medical Education and The Clinical Teacher; and the Deputy Editor (Statistics) for the European Spine Journal. She sits on various School, Faculty and University Committees as member or Chair.

Expertise Summary

I have expert knowledge of research methods, including ethics, study design and medical statistics. I have significant experience of managing large datasets and undertaking advanced statistical analyses, including multi-level modelling, geographically weighted regression, geographic information systems, spatial analyses, k-medoid cluster analyses (unpublished work for MacMillan Cancer) and structural equation modelling; evidenced by my publication record. I have designed and built a spatial microsimulation model which is widely available for researchers/analysts to use. I have contributed to three books on health data spatial analyses and spatial microsimulation modelling. I understand the importance of discretion in handling confidential information, with strong knowledge of the data protection laws and the University data management requirements, and experience in handling patient identifiable data.

Teaching Summary

Kim Edwards is a senior educationalist and epidemiologist (Associate Professor) in Academic Orthopaedics, Trauma and Sports Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham. She is a Senior… read more

Research Summary

I have a strong interest in medical education research and have undertaken projects in flipped teaching and peer marking schemes. In terms of my discipline specific research, I focus on physical… read more

Selected Publications

Kim Edwards is a senior educationalist and epidemiologist (Associate Professor) in Academic Orthopaedics, Trauma and Sports Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham. She is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

She is Director of postgraduate education for the School of Medicine and Course Director for two masters courses in the School: MSc Sports and Exercise Medicine and MSc Applied Sport and Exercise Medicine. This gives her a very broad knowledge of University processes, assessment and quality assurance of teaching and learning.

She is the module convenor for the Sport and Exercise Nutrition module, delivering a module co-constructed with students, to provide practical instruction in nutrition assessment and advice with a solid evidence base. She takes innovative approach to teaching and learning, often flipping her classrooms and making extensive use of e-learning. Kim has ten years of experience teaching Research Methods and Statistics and managed the Research Methods taught module and Research Project and Dissertation module until January 2017. She continues to teach Research Methods and Statistics for ten years to postgraduate medics and other health care professionals outside of the masters programmes (e.g. FRCS(Orth) Examination revision courses).

In addition she supervises many undergraduates, interns, MSc and PhD research students and provides academic and pastoral support to MSc students. She was Senior Postgraduate Tutor for the School of Medicine for three years (to 2016).

Current Research

I have a strong interest in medical education research and have undertaken projects in flipped teaching and peer marking schemes. In terms of my discipline specific research, I focus on physical activity, diet and environmental exposures and their association with chronic disease, such as osteoarthritis, cancer and obesity, from a public health and/or spatial epidemiology perspective. For example, spinal cancer patients' quality of life; school environment/childhood obesity; running/knee joint health; exercise adherence; interaction between obesity, injury and physical activity for knee osteoarthritis. I also develop and test small area estimation techniques, largely for modelling health data (e.g. I have used spatial microsimulation modelling to estimate physical activity behaviour, adult obesity and osteoarthritis).

My top 10 papers:

  • Merrick D, Leveritt S, McKnight G, Edwards K, Pratten M (2016). What Anatomy Is Clinically Useful And When Should We Be Teaching It? Anatomical Sciences Education. (Accepted 21/12/15)
  • Timmins KE, Leech R, Batt ME, Edwards KL. Running and knee osteoarthritis: a systematic review and meta-analysis. American Journal of Sports Medicine (accepted 12/5/16)
  • Ching A, Skou ST< Thomas SA, Batt ME, Roos EM, Edwards KL (2016). A mixed methods study of knee confidence and self-efficacy: perceptions of knee osteoarthritis patients from the good life with osteoarthritis in Denmark initiative. Osteoarthritis and Cartilage 04/2016; 24. DOI:10.1016/j.joca.2016.01.892
  • Quraishi NA, et al (2015). Re-operation Rates in the Surgical Treatment of Spinal Metastases. The Spine Journal, 15(3), Suppl: S37-S43
  • Morris M et al (2014). What is the cost of a healthy diet? Using diet data from the UK Women's Cohort Study. Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health, 68 (11), 1043-1049
  • Fraser LK, et al (2012). Fast food and obesity: A spatial analysis in a large UK population of children aged 13-15. American Journal of Preventative Medicine, 42(5):e77- e85
  • Hughes RJ, et al (2012). Exploring UK variations in childhood consumption of fruit and vegetables. British Journal of Nutrition, 108 (04): 733-742
  • Fraser LK, et al (2011). Fast Food, other food choices and body mass index in a cohort of teenagers in the UK; A structural equation modelling approach. International Journal of Obesity, 35: 1325-1330
  • Edwards KL, et al (2010). The neighbourhood matters: studying exposures relevant to childhood obesity and the policy implications in Leeds, UK. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 64(3): 194-201
  • Edwards KL & Clarke GP (2009). The design and validation of a spatial microsimulation model of obesogenic environments in Leeds: SimObesity. Social Science and Medicine, 69: 1127-1134

Past Research

Modern environments do not necessarily encourage residents to have an active, healthy lifestyle. In fact, the sedentary option is often the easiest choice. Accordingly my research regarding the obesogenic environment has lead me to examine the relationship between obesity and many different aspects of the environment, including access to facilities, urbanisation, social capital, deprivation, and neighbourhood safety, as well as many behavioural aspects, such as physical activity levels, sedentary behaviour, diet in terms of consumption and expenditure.

As part of my PhD I developed SimObesity, a deterministic spatial microsimulation model that can be used to estimate health data, such as obesity prevalence or physical activity levels. Please get in touch if you would like to use a version.

Sports and Exercise Medicine Group

School of Medicine
The University of Nottingham
Queen's Medical Centre, C Floor, West Block
Nottingham, NG7 2UH


telephone: +44 (0) 115 823 1111
email:sports.med@nottingham.ac.uk