Sustainable Chemicals
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Image of David Amabilino

David Amabilino

EPSRC/GSK Professor of Sustainable Chemistry, Faculty of Science

Contact

  • workRoom A10 GSK Carbon Neutral Laboratories for Sustainable Chemistry
    Jubilee Campus
    Wollaton Road
    Nottingham
    NG8 1BB
    UK
  • work0115 7484711

Biography

David Amabilino received both B.Sc. (1988) and Ph.D. (1991) degrees from the University of London (Royal Holloway and Bedford New College). After a three year stay at the University of Birmingham (UK) in Fraser Stoddart`s group, he worked as a postdoctoral fellow at the Universite Louis Pasteur in Strasbourg with Jean-Pierre Sauvage, and then moved to the Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona (ICMAB-CSIC) where he gained a post as tenured scientist (1999) and then worked his way up to Research Professor (the maximum rank in 2009). In 2014 he was appointed an EPSRC/GSK Chair in Sustainable Chemistry in the School of Chemistry at the University of Nottingham. He serves on the Board of the journal Chirality and is Associate Editor of Chemical Society Reviews. He was awarded the Elhuyar-Goldschmidt Prize from the GdCh in 2011 for his research into molecular materials.

Expertise Summary

David Amabilino is an organic chemist by training, particularly focused on the preparation of functional molecules that can exhibit a particular property, be it optical, electrical, magnetic or other. Supramolecular chemistry is used to influence the arrangements of the molecules. The molecular materials made - ranging from small molecules to macromolecules - are characterized at both the molecular level, as self-assembled layers, thin films or bulk materials. His work focuses especially on chiral materials.

Research Summary

Electron transfer processes are targeted in which a chiral arrangement between synthetic self-assembled chromophores can be modulated and used to explore optimum conditions for charge separation.… read more

Recent Publications

Current Research

Electron transfer processes are targeted in which a chiral arrangement between synthetic self-assembled chromophores can be modulated and used to explore optimum conditions for charge separation. These molecular materials will be employed in solar cells with the ultimate goal of making more sustainable devices.

Part of the goal requires control over the phases that these materials form, and influencing nucleation and growth of aggregates and crystals will be a central scientific goal in the work. The use of far-from-equilibrium conditions to access multiple chiral phases will lead to greater understanding of the assembly processes in soft material systems.

Past Research

Supramoelcular chemistry is a common theme through all the research that David has been involved with, starting with dendrimers and podands, through catenanes (he made olympiadane) and rotaxanes and their solid state arrangements, coordination chemistry for chromophore assembly, chiral teleinduction in polymer synthesis, molecular magnets (including the preparation of chiral molecular magnets), conducting materials, liquid crystals and gels.

World-class research at the University of Nottingham

University Park
Nottingham
NG7 2RD
+44 (0) 115 951 5151
research@nottingham.ac.uk

Athena Swan Silver Award