Global Issues and Contemporary Chinese Studies MSci

   
   
  

Fact file - 2017 entry

UCAS code:738T
Qualification:MSci Hons
Type and duration:4 year UG
Qualification name:Global Issues and Contemporary Chinese Studies
UCAS code
UCAS code
738T
Qualification
Global Issues and Contemporary Chinese Studies | MSci Hons
Duration
4 years full-time
A level offer
AAB-ABB 
Required subjects
Social science or humanities A levels or equivalent and/or evidence of ability in modern languages are preferred 
IB score
34-32 
Course location
Jubilee Campus and Ningbo Campus
Course places
50
School/department
 

Overview

Equipping graduates with an understanding of contemporary China and specialised knowledge of the country's political development, this course includes a year at postgraduate level.
Read full overview

This four-year course follows the three-year BA Contemporary Chinese Studies with International Relations programme, with the addition of postgraduate level modules in the fourth year.

Year one 

You will take compulsory modules, and can choose from optional modules in a range of subjects.

Year two

Year two will be spent at The University of Nottingham Ningbo China. You will take modules which focus more on intermediate accounting and finance subjects relating to China, as well as language modules. Native Mandarin speakers remain in Nottingham for their second year and choose from a range of optional modules.

Year three

In year three you will return to Nottingham, where you will take specialised modules on a range of topics. 

Year four

In the fourth year you will take postgraduate level modules, as well as a compulsory dissertation.

 

Entry requirements

A levels: AAB-ABB; social science or humanities or equivalent and/or evidence of ability in modern languages are preferred

English language requirements 

IELTS: 6.5 (no less than 6.0 in any element)

Students who require extra support to meet the English language requirements for their academic course can attend a presessional course at the Centre for English Language Education (CELE) to prepare for their future studies. Students who pass at the required level can progress directly to their academic programme without needing to retake IELTS. Please visit the CELE webpages for more information.

Alternative qualifications 

View the alternative qualifications page for details.

Flexible admissions policy

In recognition of our applicants’ varied experience and educational pathways, The University of Nottingham employs a flexible admissions policy. We may make some applicants an offer lower than advertised, depending on their personal and educational circumstances. Please see the University’s admissions policies and procedures for more information.

Notes for applicants 

All applications are considered equally on merit; students are usually selected on the basis of academic excellence and personal qualities. We do not rely on predicted grades alone and aim to take into account the broader context of each applicant's achievements, primarily as reflected by their personal statement and reference.

If you apply to us having already completed your A levels, your application will be considered in exactly the same way as those from candidates with predicted grades. Please tell us something about your gap-year activities in your UCAS personal statement.

Applicants are not routinely interviewed. If you are offered a place you will be invited to a UCAS visit day. The aim of the visit is for you to ensure that Nottingham meets your perceived needs and aspirations. In addition to a formal presentation, which provides details of the courses we offer, you will also be able to meet members of the teaching staff and, very importantly, some current undergraduates. 

 
 

Modules

Typical year one modules

Core

Approaches to Contemporary Chinese Studies

This is an introductory course designed to provide students with appropriate study skills, familiarity with resources, an understanding of the methodological approaches used in studying contemporary China, to develop students' understanding of how to use critical approaches to study all aspects of contemporary Chinese society.

The educational aims of this module are to:

  • develop students' ability to find and utilise relevant empirical materials 
  • develop students' intellectual and transferable vocational skills 
  • develop e-learning skills
 
Introduction to Contemporary China

This is an introductory course designed to provide students with an overview of contemporary China and help students establish a foundation of knowledge and skills to pursue more advanced studies of China in their later years of study. The module examines the following topics since the founding of the People's Republic of China in 1949, though particular attention is paid to the changes in China since 1978.

On completion of this module, students will:

  • have a basic knowledge of political, economic, social and environmental developments in contemporary China 
  • be familiar with theoretical debates regarding issues in contemporary China and differing empirical approaches to studying the nature of changes in contemporary China 
  • be able to comment in an informed, critical manner on contemporary issues and developments 
  • have improved their capacity to conduct research on contemporary China
 
Mandarin Chinese for Beginners

Mandarin modules are available from beginners’ (Level 1) to research (Level 5). Students are assessed and placed at the appropriate level of study. 

Please note: Native speakers of Mandarin will take Advanced English for Disciplinary Study modules instead of Mandarin.

This module provide students with the knowledge of Chinese phonetics, grammar, vocabulary and cultural information in order to develop their competence in Mandarin Chinese. The focus is on communicative competence in both spoken and written language. The script of Mandarin Chinese is taught to make sure that students on the course are not disadvantaged by their written language.

The overall aim of the module is provide students with the phonetic and basic grammatical knowledge and develop a competence in Mandarin Chinese in spoken and written language.

 

Optional

Chinese Society and Economy

This module emphasises sociological theories of family and society with reference to China. Topics include:

  • Political and social structure of China: the State, society, families and individuals 
  • Trust, Guanxi (social relations), and social capital 
  • Rural-urban divide: dualism, 'urban bias' or 'State bias' 
  • Nationhood, identity and ethnicity 
  • Health, education and aspirations

The aim of this module is to provide an introduction to the socio-economic aspects of China. The module objectives are to develop an understanding of contemporary Chinese society, its social structures and the effects of economic reform upon these, and to generate a familiarity with the main sources of information concerning China. 

Students will apply relevant theoretical frameworks to the analysis of social issues in contemporary China and analyse evidence on these issues.

 
East Asian Business in the Twentieth Century

In view of the impact East Asian business has had on world business and trading patterns in recent decades, it is important to understand how business has evolved in the region. This module provides the historical background to key developments in East Asian business, including:

  • The history of Western business in Asia from colonial times to the post-Second World War period 
  • The economic, political and social background to business development in key countries in the region 
  • The emergence of Japan as Asia's first industrialized nation, the 'Economic Miracle' and development of the 'Japan, Inc.' model 
  • The development paths of East Asia's newly industrialized countries (NICs) from colonial rule into the 1980s China's post-1978 economic growth and business development 
  • The 1997 Asian financial crisis Business organisation, industrial groups, and industrial relations in East Asia

This module aims to assess the reasons why industrial capitalism developed in East Asian economies, as well as to analyse how it was adapted to local circumstances. As well as the major economies like Japan, China, and South Korea, insights will also be gained into smaller countries like Malaysia, Indonesia, and Hong Kong. Time will also be devoted to the Chinese diaspora and the development of Chinese and other transnational business groups in the East Asian region.

 
Foundations for Politics and International Relations

This module introduces students to the intellectual and practical skills they will need for the successful study of politics. These include:

  • critical awareness of sources
  • developing effective arguments
  • note-taking and efficient reading
  • using the library and searching for resources
  • effective interpretation and presentation of data
  • essay writing
  • presentation skills

This module aims to:

  • develop the practical and intellectual skills that students need to successfully study politics
 
Introduction to Business and Economy of Contemporary China

This module intends to provide the fundamental knowledge of China's economic transformation and business development. It assists students to establish an understanding of issues including economic strategies, industrial sector transformation, investment, trade and business management.

The educational aims of this module are to:

  • provide an introductory programme that facilitates students learning in the disciplines of Management, Economics and Chinese Studies
  • introduce to students theoretical debates and empirical materials that are used in explaining business-related issues
  • familiarize students with comparative perspectives on business practices generally, and Chinese business practices specifically
  • practise and develop students' intellectual and transferable vocational skills 
  • foster students' awareness with economic issues, policies and institutions of China
 
Modern Political Theory
This module introduces students to the ideas of some of the canonical thinkers in the history of political thought, such as Burke, Rousseau, Kant, Mill, and Marx. The module considers the impact of these thinkers on modern political thought and practice, with reference to key political ideas and historical developments (such as liberty and equality, and the Enlightenment). The course will be text based.  
This module aims to provide knowledge of:
  • the history of western political thought
  • some central issues and debates of political philosophy
  • the contexts in which the various thinkers wrote
  • the principal arguments of their canonical texts 
  • their analysis of key ideas such as property, liberty, the role of the state etc 
 
 

Typical year two modules

Core modules in China

Intermediate Mandarin

Mandarin modules are available from beginners’ (Level 1) to research (Level 5). Students are assessed and placed at the appropriate level of study. 

Please note: Native speakers of Mandarin will take Advanced English for Disciplinary Study modules instead of Mandarin.

This module concentrates on revising the basic skills acquired during previous study and aims to further develop students' oral and written communicative ability in the Mandarin Chinese language in more complex situations. The Mandarin Chinese language will be used as much as possible in class.

The overall aim of the module is to produce students who develop further competence in the four skills of the Mandarin Chinese language: listening, speaking, reading and writing, together with more complex grammatical structures.

 
Research Techniques in Contemporary Chinese Studies

How do researchers plan and deliver research projects? What are some of the ethical and practical considerations central to carrying out research? How do students start to become researchers in the China field? This module will address these questions by developing students’ skills, knowledge and understanding of a range of research methods and fieldwork techniques in the Chinese context. 

Topics for this module cover research design and strategies, case studies, semi-structured interviews, content & discourse analysis, risk assessment, safety and ethical issues, group and individual research projects.

Students will undertake practical fieldwork activities while based at The University of Nottingham campus in Ningbo. Seminar contact hours will comprise of student-led teaching sessions, small group and/or individual tutorials, and fieldwork trips. Where possible, students of Chinese language programmes will be encouraged to apply their nascent Chinese language skills to research tasks. Relevant fieldwork, information gathering and recording, writing and presentation skills will also be developed and enhanced.

The aims of this module are to:

  • develop awareness and understanding of a range of research methods and fieldwork techniques in China
  • enable students to plan and undertake research activities in a field setting in China
  • provide guidance in the development of safety, ethical and cross-cultural considerations associated with research and fieldwork investigations
  • introduce skills of information collection and synthesis, and develop the ability to evaluate the significance and relevance of information
  • enable students to locate and handle a variety of primary source materials together with other relevant data, and to construct a bibliography of secondary sources
 
The Rise of Modern China

This module covers the history of China from the 1840s, through to the establishment of the People's Republic in 1949. It looks at social, cultural, political and economic developments in this period from a variety of angles and approaches.

The module focuses in particular on the ways in which Chinese society responded to the arrival of 'modernity' in the form of the Western powers and Japan throughout the period in question, but also how different groups in China tried to remould or redefine China as a 'modern' nation-state and society.

The educational aims of this module are to:

  • develop students' understanding of the major events and processes which shaped Chinese society between1840 and 1949 
  • enhance students' understanding of historiographical debates around the subject 
  • practise and develop students' intellectual and transferable skills
 

Optional modules in China

Chinese Society and Economy

This module emphasises sociological theories of family and society with reference to China. Topics include:

  • Political and social structure of China: the State, society, families and individuals 
  • Trust, Guanxi (social relations), and social capital 
  • Rural-urban divide: dualism, 'urban bias' or 'State bias' 
  • Nationhood, identity and ethnicity 
  • Health, education and aspirations

The aim of this module is to provide an introduction to the socio-economic aspects of China. The module objectives are to develop an understanding of contemporary Chinese society, its social structures and the effects of economic reform upon these, and to generate a familiarity with the main sources of information concerning China. 

Students will apply relevant theoretical frameworks to the analysis of social issues in contemporary China and analyse evidence on these issues.

 
International Political Economy

This module introduces students to the major topics in China's interaction with and role in international political economy (IPE). It includes useful concepts and theories in IPE, the evolution of China’s ties with international political economy since 1949, the linkage between domestic and international political economy of China and players in the making of external political economic policies in China.

It also examines China's role in international economic regimes (such as the WTO) and in the global and regional orders of political economy. It provides a survey of the political economy of China’s ties with the major powers and regions such as the US, East Asia, and major oil producing nations.

This module aims at enabling students to develop an understanding of the role China plays in international political economy and think critically issues related to this topic.

 
The Politics of Development

This module will look at theories and experiences of economic development. It will address the sociological, political and ethical questions related to modernisation and compare different theoretical approaches to development. It will furthermore consider the practical problems arising from development management and organisation and take the role of international organisations, NGOs and state actors under close scrutiny.

The aim of this module is to introduce student of international studies to the issue area of global development politics and to problems of economic and socio-political development (modernisation).

 

Core modules in Nottingham

The Rise of Modern China

This module covers the history of China from the 1840s, through to the establishment of the People's Republic in 1949. It looks at social, cultural, political and economic developments in this period from a variety of angles and approaches.

The module focuses in particular on the ways in which Chinese society responded to the arrival of 'modernity' in the form of the Western powers and Japan throughout the period in question, but also how different groups in China tried to remould or redefine China as a 'modern' nation-state and society.

The educational aims of this module are to:

  • develop students' understanding of the major events and processes which shaped Chinese society between1840 and 1949 
  • enhance students' understanding of historiographical debates around the subject 
  • practise and develop students' intellectual and transferable skills
 

Optional modules in Nottingham

Approaches to Politics and International Relations

The module introduces students to alternative theoretical approaches to the study of political phenomena.

We consider the different forms of analysing, explaining, and understanding politics associated with approaches such as:

  • behaviouralism
  • rational choice theory
  • institutionalism
  • Marxism
  • feminism
  • interpretive theory
  • post-modernism

The module shows that the different approaches are based upon contrasting 'ontological' suppositions about the nature of politics, and they invoke alternative 'epistemological' assumptions about how we acquire valid knowledge of politics and international relations.

We examine questions such as:

  • what constitutes valid knowledge in political science and international relations?
  • should political science methodology be the same as the methods employed in the natural sciences?
  • can we give causal explanations of social and political phenomena?
  • can we ever be objective in our analysis?
  • what is the relationship between knowledge and power?
 
Chinese Society and Economy

This module emphasises sociological theories of family and society with reference to China. Topics include:

  • Political and social structure of China: the State, society, families and individuals 
  • Trust, Guanxi (social relations), and social capital 
  • Rural-urban divide: dualism, 'urban bias' or 'State bias' 
  • Nationhood, identity and ethnicity 
  • Health, education and aspirations

The aim of this module is to provide an introduction to the socio-economic aspects of China. The module objectives are to develop an understanding of contemporary Chinese society, its social structures and the effects of economic reform upon these, and to generate a familiarity with the main sources of information concerning China. 

Students will apply relevant theoretical frameworks to the analysis of social issues in contemporary China and analyse evidence on these issues.

 
East Asian Business in the Global Economy

The organisation and globalisation of business in the major economies of East Asia will be examined. Focusing on Japan, China and Korea, it will be possible to identify characteristic features of East Asian business systems, the internationalisation of various types of business systems and the trajectories of interaction between East Asian and north Atlantic businesses.

This module is aimed principally at assessing the interactions between East Asian Business and the global economy. Building on the first semester module that outlines the evolution of East Asian business systems, this module will contextualise these developments and link them with recent trends associated with globalisation.

Students will become familiar with the nature of East Asian business, how East Asian economies have fared over the last 20 years, and the influence of 'collective management' practices on European and American business and organisations. They will also be able to judge the extent to which convergence has become a major force in world business over the last 20 years.

 
Social Change and Public Policy in China's Reform Era

Students will learn how the Chinese central government has responded to socio-economic changes by issuing a number of key policy initiatives, most notably in the field of social security, health, education, labour, innovation and the environment. In the first part of the module participants will be sensitized about the interplay between socio-economic transformation, administrative reform and public policy making during China's reform era (1978-). Students will gain a deeper understanding how new government functions contribute to innovations in public sector management.

Drawing both on primary and secondary sources students will familiarise themselves with the increasingly lively domestic debates among social and political scientists, educators, media professionals, civil society practitioners, government officials and lawyers about goals and means of China's modernisation drive. In the second part of the module students will learn about the expanded spaces for participatory policy making in China by analysing case studies in all five substantive policy fields.

Students will be enabled to acquire the necessary theoretical and practical skills to analyse public policies in China. They will be encouraged to think critically about policy models and contrast them with evolving practices of public policy making in China.

Participants will gain a better understanding of the scale of social change in China, learn about the value of participatory policy making, and through small and big group deliberations and action will internalise a culture of collaboration by developing group presentations on selected public policies.

 
 

Typical year three modules

Core

Government and Politics of Taiwan and Hong Kong

This module introduces students to the nature and driving forces for politics and for development in the two most important Chinese societies that followed paths different from that adopted on the Chinese mainland under the leadership of the Communist Party.

This module aims at stimulating students to think critically about the uniqueness of China, its people, tradition and politics. It is best taken by students who have already studied the politics and society of the PRC. They will be required to reflect critically on the significance and the implications of Taiwan and Hong Kong having followed alternative approaches successfully.

 
International Political Economy of China

This module introduces students to the major topics in China's interaction with and role in international political economy (IPE). It includes useful concepts and theories in IPE, the evolution of China’s ties with international political economy since 1949, the linkage between domestic and international political economy of China and players in the making of external political economic policies in China.

It also examines China's role in international economic regimes (such as the WTO) and in the global and regional orders of political economy. It provides a survey of the political economy of China’s ties with the major powers and regions such as the US, East Asia, and major oil producing nations.

This module aims at enabling students to develop an understanding of the role China plays in international political economy and think critically issues related to this topic.

 

Optional

China's Political Economy

This module examines the interaction between politics and economy in China during the economic reform period from 1978 onward. Particular attention will be given to the progress and periods of China's reform, the political context of major economic policies, reform of major aspects of the economy, evolution of economic institutions, as well as an overview of economic development in China prior to 1978.

The module will highlight the role of the political factors and state policies in China’s economy, which is important for a good understanding of the reform and economic development in China.

The educational aims of this module are to:

  • enhance students' understanding of the relationship between politics and economics in contemporary China and how politics affects economic policies in China 
  • familiarize students with debates and empirical materials that are used in explaining changes in China's political economy 
  • provide a programme that facilitates progressive learning in the disciplines of Political Economy and Chinese Studies 
  • foster students' cultural awareness and understanding of a populous developing nation and economy 
  • provide a programme that facilitates students' progressive learning in the disciplines of Political Economy and Chinese Studies
  • enhance students' understanding of the theoretical debates and empirical materials that are used in explaining the inter-relationship of politics and economics in contemporary China 
  • practise and develop students' intellectual and transferable vocational skills 
  • foster students' cultural awareness
 
Chinese Film and Literature

The module examines the close linkage between literature and cinema in China. It also explores trends in modern Chinese cinema and literature, with a primary focus on different genres and themes developed since 1978. By placing Chinese cinema and literature within their cultural, social and historical contexts, students will analyse, interpret and appreciate such phenomena.

It will include analyses of individual texts in translation and films with English subtitles. The module requires students to view films in English subtitles each week. It will increase students' awareness of the major developments in literature and film as they are embedded in the wider changes in modern China.

The module leads students to examine the shifting socio-political and cultural landscape in mainland China in the 20th and 21st centuries through the lens of film and literature.

Crossing disciplinary boundaries including film studies, cultural studies, media studies and sinology, students will not only gain a knowledge of key issues and events in modern and contemporary Chinese history and society, but also of approaches to understanding and appreciating literary and cinematic texts.

 
Mandarin Chinese for the Advanced Level

Mandarin modules are available from beginners’ (Level 1) to research (Level 5). Students are assessed and placed at the appropriate level of study. 

Please note: Native speakers of Mandarin will take Advanced English for Disciplinary Study modules instead of Mandarin.

Module content is as follows:

  1. Studies on accuracy of grammar on times and changes, and connectors and discourse markers in spoken and written Chinese
  2. Vocabulary related to physical features, personalities, human social behaviours, economic developments and basic statistics 
  3. Language functions for relating experiences, describing physical features, making generalisations, defining historic personalities and celebrities and describing changes, etc. 

The aim of this module is to build on the practical language experiences gained previously, to consolidate and extend vocabulary, to increase comprehension, to reinforce grammatical accuracy and to develop a fluent command of written and spoken Mandarin Chinese.

 
Media and Communications in Globalising China

Media systems are critically important in any modern political system, and this module leads students directly to the heart of understanding how the media relates to contemporary society and politics in the People's Republic of China. It introduces students to the unprecedented transformation in contemporary Chinese media and communication in the context of economic reforms, development of new media technologies and globalisation.

The educational aims of this module are to:

  • demonstrate to the students that Chinese media embodies a tense negotiation site between official ideologies and the market, the Party and state and the society, propaganda and commerce 
  • foster students' awareness of the relationships between the Party-state and the society, intensified by powers brought by commercialisation, globalisation and new media 
  • introduce students to the key changes in media and communications embedded in the rapidly changing political, economic and globalising contexts since 1978 
  • develop students' understanding of the debate between media and democracy and their ability to handle relevant empirical materials 
  • practise and develop students' intellectual and transferable vocational skills
 
Politics of East Asia

This module affords an understanding of the linkage between international and domestic politics in East Asia. The module is divided into three parts:

  • The first part offers conceptual and historical perspectives that enable one to analyse how international and domestic politics relate to each other.
  • The second part focuses on China and Japan, and examines their domestic transformation and foreign policy development in the post-cold war period.
  • The third part focuses on key issues of the region, and examines how those issues affect domestic transformation of East Asian states, and in turn, how the domestic transformation affects those issues.

This module aims to:

  • enable students to identify and discuss conceptual and historical perspectives found in the literature on the politics of East Asia
  • explore ways to analyse the links between global and domestic politics in East Asia and how they relate to the conceptual and historical perspectives in the literature
  • develop a framework of enquiry within which students can construct subject-related knowledge and relevant research skills
 
Religion in Modern China

This module will introduce students to Chinese religion as a social phenomenon, and provide an overview of the officially-recognised belief systems comprising China's religious landscape. It will examine the doctrines, practices and institutions of different religious groups, while also considering the unofficial traditions that play an important role in modern Chinese religiosity.

Major topics covered include:

  • Buddhism, Daoism, Islam, Protestantism and Christianity in China 
  • Folk belief and new religious movements (NRMs) 
  • China's ongoing Confucian revival 
  • Policies affecting the governance of religion, and their history, in China 
  • The political dimension of religion in China

In this module, students will gain a nuanced understanding of religion in modern China and its relation to politics and society at large. Through lectures, seminars and analysis of the news-cycle, students will develop informed perspectives on the various issues affecting Chinese religious belief and practice. This will, in turn, inform their broader understanding of Chinese culture, society and its recent history.

 
The Rights and Wrongs of Climate Change

What should the world do about climate change? How should we proceed in the face of persistent claims that it won't do serious harm, or isn't occurring at all?

Should poor countries as well as rich ones be obliged to cut their carbon emissions? Is it wrong for individuals to fly? What if you offset your flight? How much weight should we accord harm that may come many years in the future?

Arguments about climate change raise many of the most controversial issues in contemporary ethics and political theory. This module will examine these debates and the broader questions they hinge on. This module aims to:

  • familiarise students with some of the key debates surrounding climate change
  • expand students' knowledge of moral philosophy, political theory and environmental ethics
 
 

Typical year four modules

Core

China and the World

This module introduces students to the traditional Chinese and the Maoist world views, though it focusses on the changes that have taken place since the start of the reform period. It explores how domestic politics and other developments have contributed on the one hand to the rise of China as a great power of the first league and to the emergence of a 19th century European type of nationalism on the other. 

It addresses China's use of force in support of foreign policy as well as its attempts to project soft power. It also reviews China' relations with its major partners or competitors, including the USA, the EU (including the UK), and the importance of Taiwan in China's relations with the rest of the world.

This module aims at stimulating students to think critically about what is the rightful place for China in the modern world, including why such a question still needs to be raised for a great power that holds the veto at the UN Security Council. It is best taken by students who enjoy questioning what have been widely taken for granted.

 
Dissertation

This is an individual dissertation project based on a Chinese studies topic to be agreed by the candidate and the dissertation tutor (module convenor) and specialist supervisor.

The module aims to:

  • develop skills of problem recognition and definition
  • raise awareness of and responding to the ethical issues related to gathering data
  • implement risk assessment skills related to fieldwork and developing a culture of safety and appropriate research practices
  • have the opportunity to develop and apply research design and investigation skills in a field-based environment
  • enhance skills of information collection and synthesis, and the ability to evaluate the significance and relevance of information
 

Optional

Chinese Economic Issues

This module introduces students to different hot topics and cutting-edge research on Chinese economy, and offers a platform for allowing postgraduate students to connect with experts in the field. Topics vary across the years, including but not limited to China’s economic growth, investment and trade, foreign direct investment, the financial and banking reform; science, technology and innovation; regional inequality; business management.

The module aims to develop students' knowledge and understanding of key economic issues in China in an era of rapid development and change. It complements other compulsory and optional modules available on China’s management and business, politics, law, culture and society, and history.

 
Contemporary Chinese Culture and Society

This modules introduces students to key concepts in the understanding of contemporary Chinese culture and features of Chinese society, including: 

  • Continuity and change in the Chinese family
  • Rural and urban society
  • Chinese youth and generational identity
  • Ethnicity and religion in contemporary China
  • The arts and popular culture

The module aims to develop students' knowledge and understanding of continuity and change in China’s society and culture during the reform era. It complements other taught-postgraduate modules on China’s contemporary history, politics, law, economic development, and business.

 
EU-China: Trade, Aid and Public Diplomacy in the 21st Century

Participants will learn about the state-of-the-art of western engagement with China during the past 35 years (1978-), in particular western trade and development policies towards China and gain insights into the interplay between bilateral and multilateral development agencies and Chinese domestic partner organisations. Participants learn to critique emerging partnerships between international NGOs and domestic civil society organisations and academic institutions. 

Drawing both on primary and secondary sources participants will familiarize themselves with the increasingly lively international debates among Chinese and non-Chinese social and political scientists, educators, media professionals, civil society practitioners, government officials, and lawyers about goals and means of western China engagement. This optional module will provide a socially relevant policy curriculum and help students develop necessary skills for a democratic practice of public policy inquiry.

Domestic and international students will be enabled to acquire the necessary theoretical and practical skills to analyze western engagement with China. They will be encouraged to think critically about the modalities of western development aid and trade policies towards China.

Participants will gain a better understanding of the scale of European partnerships with China, learn about the value of transparency and accountability in international relations and public diplomacy, and through small and big group deliberations and action will internalize a culture of collaboration by developing small group presentations on selected issues covered in this module.

 
Europe and the Developing World

This module analyses the decision-making process and current policy issues in both economic (first pillar) and political and security (CFSP: Common Foreign and Security Policies, and ESDP: European Security and Defence Policies) policies within the European Union. We will examine theories, concepts and case studies to explain the nature of contemporary EU policies towards Africa, the Middle East and Asia.

The module aims to:

  • promote a critical engagement with material in the International Relations and European Foreign Policy field
  • provide an insight into the link between theory and practice of security policies
  • provide an understanding of how the European Union reacts to international crises
  • provide a basis for further study or careers in government, international organisations, media and the military
 
Human Resource Management and Industrial Relations in China

The module aims to develop students' knowledge and understanding of the theory and practice of HRM and industrial relations in China during the reform era across enterprises in all ownership sectors. 

HRM is a crucial element of industrial relations, by providing the students sound understanding of theory concerning collective relationship between employees and employers, and the role of union and non-union in representation of employees through the examination of practical issues such as collective bargaining, grievance, and industrial actions.

This module aims to provide students generic understanding of main elements in industrial relations, from employee/employer relationship to government/business relationship, then more broadly, to the dynamic interaction between local state and society. Within industrial relations, the HRM is a crucial part so the module will also introduce the practice and operation of HRM. 

This module pays specific attention on the China market, especially the state/market relationship after 1978 economic reform.

 
International Development: China, Asia, Africa

This module examines challenges facing China and the main developing regions in the world, i.e most parts of Asia and Africa. It looks at international agencies such as the United Nations, the World Bank and the IMF, and North-South and South-South collaborations in promoting socioeconomic developments in the low-income countries; It also introduces methods of cross-country comparative analysis, examines development models from an international perspective; and evaluates socio-economic policies in different regions at both macro and micro levels.

This module aims to provide students with research-led teaching on the issues of international development, North-South and South-South cooperation, and the inter-linkage between economic development and social and human developments; it will lead students to examine these issues with theories and perspectives in economics, sociology, political science, and cultural studies; it will assist students in obtaining an in-depth and evidence-based understanding of international policy-making; and to familiarise students with the different strategic public or social policies adopted by a variety of countries with different political systems, social structures and economic mechanisms.

 
Law, Market and Society in China

The lecture/seminar examines legal developments in China in the context of China's construction of a market economy and of China's participation into globalization since 1978. It focuses on particular aspects of legal development in China's making of a market economy. Based upon social-legal theoretical frameworks it aims to evaluate the transformation of the relationship among the state, law and market economy in China.

The module aims to develop students' knowledge and understanding of the relationships among state, law and market economy of China in the reform era. It complements other taught-postgraduate modules on China’s management and business, history, politics, economic development, and culture and society.

 
Marketing Management in China and Emerging Markets

The module covers the following main topics:

  • Understanding marketing management in China and emerging markets
  • Capturing marketing insights
  • Connecting with customers
  • Building strong brands
  • Shaping the market offerings
  • Delivering value
  • Communicating value
  • Creating successful long-term growth 

The module aims to develop students' knowledge and understanding of the theory and practice of marketing management in China and emerging markets.

 
The Theory and Practice of Diplomacy

This module focuses on the changing nature of diplomatic practice, together with the range of conceptual tools that seek to explain this international activity. Its focus is contemporary. It provides a political analysis of new developments such as the public diplomacy, the decline of resident embassies and foreign ministries, and the role of regional/multinational organisations and summitry. It also encourages students to consider future theoretical and practical developments in this field.

The module is linked to the research interests of the three members of staff who will deliver this module. It offers an advanced study of ther theory and practice of current diplomacy. It will deal with core issues of diplomatic technique in part 1 and contemporary issues of diplomacy in part 2.

 
Theories and Concepts in International Relations

The War on Iraq and the US and British invasion of the country in 2003 has led to huge tensions in geopolitics. At the same time, the supposed 'threat' of international terrorism and continuing financial turmoil in the world economy have both brought to the fore the global politics of co-operation and confrontation. Whilst it might be possible to agree on the signifcance of these events, the explanation and/or understanding of them is dependent on prior theoretical choices. The purpose of this module is to make students aware of the diversity of approaches to international theory.

The overall aim of the module is to provide students with a solid theoretical and conceptual grounding of this diversity. The module aims to:

  • familiarise students with the contemporary literature and debates
  • establish competence in a variety of approaches
  • appreciate the strengths and weaknesses of competing approaches
  • develop an understanding of how key concepts are conceived and applied in international relations develop a critical comparison of the application of the dominant explanatory models
  • understand the reasons for the use of specific approaches
 
War, Peace and Terror

This module explores the blurring boundaries between war and peace, and the implications for understanding security. The first section assesses the changing nature of warfare, including theories of asymmetric warfare and terrorism; the second section examines the ‘dark arts’ of international relations, from assassination to psychological warfare, operating in the grey area between war and peace. With large scale conventional warfare increasingly unlikely, the third section considers ‘new’ security issues in peacetime such as poverty and disease.

This module aims to:

  • give students critical understanding of the blurring boundaries between war and peace in the modern world
  • introduce students to a range of issues, from terrorism to covert action, which are increasingly challenging conventional distinctions between war and peace
  • introduce students to theories of war, peace, and security and impart an awareness of how the ‘security’ agenda of states and societies is changing
 
 

 

The modules we offer are inspired by the research interests of our staff and as a result may change for reasons of, for example, research developments or legislation changes. This list is an example of typical modules we offer, not a definitive list.

 
 

Careers

The University of Nottingham is consistently named as one of the most targeted universities by Britain's leading graduate employers.* The skills you develop during your Chinese studies degree at Nottingham are skills which a wide range of employers will recognise and value. You will leave us with an insight into the world's fastest growing economy.

As well as transferable skills, the other great benefit of your Nottingham degree is the in-depth understanding you will develop of the rapid changes China is undergoing today. If you take advantage of opportunities to study in China, you will see a side of the country that tourists, backpackers and most expatriates working there, never discover.

Your assumptions about China will be thoroughly challenged during your studies and you will see what is really happening in the world's most populous nation. This kind of knowledge and understanding of China is still in very short supply in the UK and beyond, and can give you a vital edge in the graduate jobs market, with or without a high level of language proficiency.

* The Graduate Market in 2013, 2014 and 2015, High Fliers Research.

Average starting salary and career progression

In 2014, 100% of first-degree graduates in the school who were available for employment had secured work or further study within six months of graduation.*

* Known destinations of full-time home and EU first-degree graduates 2013/14.

Careers support and advice

Studying for a degree at The University of Nottingham will provide you with the type of skills and experiences that will prove invaluable in any career, whichever direction you decide to take.

Throughout your time with us, our Careers and Employability Service can work with you to improve your employability skills even further; assisting with job or course applications, searching for appropriate work experience placements and hosting events to bring you closer to a wide range of prospective employers.

Have a look at our Careers page for an overview of all the employability support and opportunities that we provide to current students.

 
 

Fees and funding

Scholarships and bursaries

The University of Nottingham offers a wide range of bursaries and scholarships. These funds can provide you with an additional source of non-repayable financial help.

Home students*

There are several types of bursary and scholarship on offer. Download our funding guide or visit our financial support pages to find out more about tuition fees, loans, budgeting and sources of funding.

To be eligible to apply for most of these funds you must be liable for the £9,000 tuition fee and not be in receipt of a bursary from outside the University.

* A 'home' student is one who meets certain UK residence criteria. These are the same criteria as apply to eligibility for home funding from Student Finance.

International/EU students

The University of Nottingham provides information and advice on financing your degree and managing your finances as an international student. The International Office offers a range of High Achiever Prizes for students from selected schools and colleges to help with the cost of tuition fees.  
 
 

Key Information Sets (KIS)

Key Information Sets (KIS)

KIS is an initiative that the government has introduced to allow you to compare different courses and universities.

 

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Disclaimer
This online prospectus has been drafted in advance of the academic year to which it applies. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information is accurate at the time of publishing, but changes (for example to course content) are likely to occur given the interval between publishing and commencement of the course. It is therefore very important to check this website for any updates before you apply for the course where there has been an interval between you reading this website and applying.

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