School of Veterinary Medicine and Science
   
   
  

Chinwe Nwachukwu

Name:

Nwachukwu Chinwe Uchechi nee Amadi

Email: 

svxcn@nottingham.ac.uk

Room:

B31

Biography:

I have M.Sc in Animal Science, 2010, University of Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria and B.Agric (Hons) in Animal Science and Animal Health, 2005, Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Umudike, Abia State, Nigeria.  My M.Sc research was on the effect of growth promoters on performance and gut microbial characteristics of rabbits and my undergraduate research project was the effect of genotype and frequency of collection on semen characteristics of chickens. I work as a Lecturer in Alvan Ikoku Federal College of Education, Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria where l taught several Animal Science and Animal Production courses to the undergraduate students of Agricultural Science. I have supervised several research projects in the aspect of Animal Science and Animal Production to the undergraduate students of Agricultural Science in my institution before l came to University of Nottingham to further my education. My research interest is on the reproductive physiology of female animals – ruminants.

Degree Registration:

Full-Time PhD, Veterinary Medicine and Science, due for completion 2018

School Research Theme: 

Reproductive Biology

Research Topic: 

The role and regulation of angiogenesis during key stages of ovarian follicular development.

Summary of Research:

There is a decline in cattle fertility which has been unilaterally recognised over the years. This has also caused a huge economic loss annually to United Kingdom. Reproduction and fertility requires the optimum development of the ovarian follicle, which is responsible for the maturation of the oocyte and production of steroid hormone to induce sexual receptivity. The oocyte and its associated follicle has to undergo several developmental stages. Cattle with lower antral follicle counts (AFC) have shown decreased follicular and luteal function with reduced fertility. Also maternal undernutrition has been associated with reduced AFC in the offspring(s). With the highlights, an insight mechanism on the causes of reduced ovarian reserve is required. Also, the aspect on the degree of vascularisation of the developing follicle will be done on the research. My research hypothesis tests the inadequate vascularisation of the ovary and/or follicle at key stages leads to reduced function and thus fertility. This research study aims on checking the effect of nutritional influence on fetal ovarian development and its associated vasculature, the regulation of follicular theca vascularisation and the effects of gonadotrophin support on pre-ovulatory follicle vascularisation.

Research Supervisors:

Dr Bob Robinson  (School of Veterinary Medicine & Science)

Dr Katie Woad  (School of Veterinary Medicine & Science)

Primary Funding Source:

Tetfund

Publications:

  • AMADI, C. U., Ibe, S. N., and Nwachukwu, E. N. (2012). Assessment of microbial quality on Indigenous Cocks Semen. International Journal of Applied Research and Technology. 1(4): 143 – 149.
  • Ewuola, E. O., AMADI, C. U., Imam, T. K., and Jagum, A. T. (2012). Effects of Dietary Prebiotics and Probiotics on the Gut Microbial Characteristics in Rabbits. International Journal of Applied Research and Technology. 1(4): 150 – 157.
  • Ewuola, E. O., Imam, T. K. and AMADI, C. U. (2011). Ileal mucosal development and growth indices in rabbits fed dietary natural growth promoters. Proceeding of the 36th Annual Conference, Nigerian society for Animal Production (NSAP), 13th-16th March, 2011, University of Abuja, F. C. T, Nigeria. Pp 330 -332.
  • Ewuola, E. O., AMADI, C. U., and Imam, T. K. (2011). Performance evaluation and nutrient digestibility of rabbits fed dietary prebiotics, probiotics and symbiotics. International Journal of Applied Agricultural and Apicultural Research. 7(1&2):107 – 117. (Nigeria)
  • Ewuola, E. O., Sokunbi, O. A., Imam, T. K. and AMADI, C. U. (2011). Influence of dietary prebiotics and probiotics on blood profile of rabbits. Proceeding of the 36th Annual Conference, Nigerian society for Animal Production (NSAP), 13th-16th March, 2011, University of Abuja, F. C. T, Nigeria. Pp 171 – 173.
 

School of Veterinary Medicine and Science

University of Nottingham
Sutton Bonington Campus
Leicestershire, LE12 5RD

telephone: +44 (0)115 951 6116
fax: +44 (0)115 951 6415
email: veterinary-enquiries@nottingham.ac.uk