The Dark Side of Microfinance: An Industry Where the Poor Play 'Cameo Roles'
Hugh Sinclair is the author of a new book titled, Confessions of a Microfinance Heretic: How Microlending Lost Its Way and Betrayed the Poor, in which he debunks the image of microfinance as a do-good industry committed to helping poor people create sustainable businesses. Instead, he documents corruption, extortionist interest rates and a lack of transparency that he says characterize much of the microfinance industry today. Sinclair spoke with Knowledge@Wharton about his book, the problems mic
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Stories in the Sky
In this activity, learners create their own constellations and star patterns and write a short, descriptive story explaining the significance of their star pattern/constellation. Then, learners can view their constellations in a homemade "planetarium" and share their stories aloud. This activity is part of a collaboration between NASA and the Navajo that also included videos that can be watched online.
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Experiencing Parallax With Your Thumb
In this activity, learners investigate parallax, a method used to measure distances to stars and planets in the solar system. Learners can see the parallax effect in action by holding their thumb out at arm's length and following simple instructions. This activity will help learners understand how the brain uses information to detect distances. This resource also describes three other basic methods for determining distances in space: radar, standard candles, and the Hubble Law.
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Elektrische kringloop : Basiskennis
MP900438633.JPG

Bij deze onlinecursus komen volgende zaken aan bod:

  • de elektrische kringloop;
  • open en gesloten kringloop;
  • kortsluiting;
  • de stroombron;
  • de elektrische geleiders;
  • de …

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Abraham Lincoln - Growing Up on the Frontier
Watch a video biography of Abraham Lincoln and learn about his early years growing up on the Kentucky frontier. (03:07)
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HTC
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Is there a healthy future for Big Pharma?
Dr Patterson will review the background to the pharmaceutical crisis and the different ways that companies are approaching the issues. The lecture will review both the research and development and business issues facing the industry and its investors. The Pharmaceutical industry has been through a period of unprecedented growth in the last three decades, fuelled by the advances in biomedical science and an increasingly affluent Western Society. Looking forward, the picture is less rosy with red
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More News is Good News: Democracy and Media in India
Prannoy Roy, director of New Delhi Television, gives a lecture on the history of NDTV and Indian television and the part democracy and rulership has played it's development.
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2.4 Staying warm …

In this section, you will meet the term ‘thermal conductivity’ and you will be asked to accept that it is ‘a measure of how readily heat flows from a particular material’. You may be uncomfortable about the lack of detailed explanation of how it is measured and of actual values and units. However, at al
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Learning outcomes

By the end of this unit you should be able to:

  • Understand the problem of green-house gas emissions;

  • Explore what you can do as an individual or household to lighten those emissions;

  • Identify how much you would need to reduce your carbon footprint to achieve an environmentally ‘sustainable’ level of emission.


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7.4 Closing thoughts

Of course, doing anything about this needs scientific evidence and understanding, but it also requires social, economic and technological changes, which can only be achieved through political will. If you want to explore some of the broader context, a good place to start would be the New Internationalist issue 357, ‘The Big Switch: Climate Change Solutions’ at New Internationalist.

Faced with the sort of predictions climatologists are making, is it sufficient for science teac
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1.6 Keeping up-to-date

How familiar are you with the following different ways of keeping up to date with information; alerts, mailing lists, newsgroups, blogs, RSS, professional bodies and societies?

  • 5 – Very familiar

  • 4 – Familiar

  • 3 – Fairly familiar

  • 2 – Not very familiar

  • 1 – Not familiar at all


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Acknowledgements

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions). This content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence

Reading 1 was prepared by Andy Lane with contributions from Christopher Mabey, Sally Caird, Mike Iles, Elizabeth McMillan, Rob Paton,
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5.6 Learning and effective action

I claim that learning is about effective action. It is distinguished when I, or another observer, recognize that I can perform what I was unable to perform before. Following Reyes and Zarama (1998), I am going to claim learning is an assessment made by an observer based on observed capacity for action. From this perspective, learning is not about ideas stored in our mind, but about action. So what makes an action effective? Reyes and Zarama (1998, p. 26) make the following claims:


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6.1 Defining amplitude

Another important property of a sine wave we need to be able to specify is its amplitude. In essence, the amplitude of a sine wave is its size. Unfortunately there are various ways of defining what is meant by the size of a sine wave, and you are likely to come across many of them in material you look at outside this unit. Before I explain what our definition is, it will help matters if we look at what is meant by the average value of a sine wave.

Figure 16 shows a sinusoidally a
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6.6 Reviewing the juggler through the understandascope

At the beginning of Part 3 I invited you to consider through the lens of the understandascope (Figure 19) an ideal model of a systems practitioner juggling the four balls of being, engaging, contextualising and managing. By introducing material based on the biology of cognition when
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4.3 The easy problems and the hard problem

What implications do naturalism and strong naturalism have for the study of the mind? There are two. First, naturalists will deny the existence of souls, spirits and other psychic phenomena and maintain that the mind is part of the natural world, subject to natural laws. This view is shared by most modern philosophers of mind. Secondly, strong naturalists will hold that mental phenomena can be reductively explained in terms of processes in the brain, which can themselves be explained i
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2.4 Act 5, Scene 2: Faustus's last soliloquy

The play draws to a close with Faustus's final soliloquy, which is supposed to mark the last hour of his life.

Activity

Please reread this speech now, thinking as you read about how Marlowe uses sound effects to heighten the emotiona
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2.1 New perspectives

The purpose of studying religion is to make the strange familiar, and the familiar strange.

Exercise

We would encourage you now to jot do
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Introduction

How do financial markets match providers with users, and how efficiently does the market determine prices? Financial markets can be notoriously volatile, and the stock market is possibly the most volatile of them all. This is after all the place where, depending on skill or on luck, investors either ‘make a killing’ or ‘lose their shirts’. But which does it depend on – skill or luck? Or does it depend on a mixture of the two? In this unit, you will find the answers to these key que
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