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Inner space: String theory & the universes' hidden dimensions - Yau Shing-Tung
Professor Yau Shing-Tung gives this lecture entitled 'The shape of inner space: String theory & the geometry of the universes' hidden dimensions' at The Australian National University on 24 November 2010. String theory says we live in a ten-dimensional universe, but that only four are accessible to our everyday senses. According to theorists, the missing six are curled up in bizarre structures known as Calabi-Yau manifolds. The discoverer of these manifolds, Professor Yau Shing-Tung, will descr
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Dato' Seri Anwar Ibrahim: Social Justice & Political Change at ANU
Dato' Seri Anwar Ibrahim gives this lecture entitled 'Social Justice & Political Change: The Malaysian Experience' at The Australian National University on 15 November 2010. Dato' Seri Anwar Ibrahim is the Leader of the Opposition in the opposition alliance called the Pakatan Rakyat (People Pact). He was Deputy Prime Minister of Malaysia from 1993-1998. He also served as Minister of Finance for Malaysia from 1991-1998. He was dismissed from office in 1998 and imprisoned after a trial described
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Matthew Gray - Middle East Conspiracy Theories: Scenes from the sandy knoll
Conspiracy theories are common in the Middle East, and cover a range of topics from US policy to 9/11, Israel's Mossad and even the death of Princess Diana. Foreign powers, local leaders, and societal actors all feature in them. Where do these conspiracy theories come from, and what do they mean? In this lecture Dr Matthew Gray examines this question by looking at several of the region's most prevalent conspiracy theories and addressing what each says about the region's politics, social dynamics
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Celebrating ND Club Service
Summary of service project completed to commemorate ND vs. Army by New York area clubs. Highlights shown of club service year round. http://mynotredame.nd.edu/s/1210/index.aspx?sid=1210&gid=1&pgid=298
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The Butterfly Dragon
Animation from COFA student Sushan Yue, winner of the Wacom Award for best 2D work at the 2010 COFA Annual Awards.
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Asia Forum 2006 Opening Session
Discussions were led by LSE academics: Professor Danny Quah, Head of Economics Department; Dr Razeen Sally, senior lecturer in international political economy and head of the international trade policy unit and Professor Robert Wade, professor of political economy and development at DESTIN. Other speakers included: Sheila Dikshit, chief minister of Delhi; Nandan M Nilekani, chief executive officer of Infosys; Mr Sun Yuxi, Chinese Ambassador to India, and Dr YV Reddy, governor of the Reserve Bank
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9 What the world said – or, the politics of the exotic
In this unit we examine the Royal Pavillion at Brighton, and its relationship to nineteenth century romanticism and exoticism. We begin with a biographical discussion of the Prince of Wales, afterwards Prince Regent and eventually King George IV, to whose specifications the Pavillion was built. With the help of video and still images we take a tour of the Pavillion, examining the exterior then a series of interior rooms as a visitor in the 1820s may have experienced them. Besides this we look at
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8 How ‘Romantic’ is the Pavilion?
In this unit we examine the Royal Pavillion at Brighton, and its relationship to nineteenth century romanticism and exoticism. We begin with a biographical discussion of the Prince of Wales, afterwards Prince Regent and eventually King George IV, to whose specifications the Pavillion was built. With the help of video and still images we take a tour of the Pavillion, examining the exterior then a series of interior rooms as a visitor in the 1820s may have experienced them. Besides this we look at
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2 Forming the form

By and large, readers tend to agree whether a poem ‘works’ or not, even if it's not clear how or why it works. The best poems retain a certain mystery, but subsequent analysis invariably reveals various techniques the writer has employed to key into this commonality. The form a poem takes, whether it be free or traditional, reflects those techniques, and is itself vital in the unlocking of ‘the logic of the imagination’.

The form a poet chooses for any one poem
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2.1 The sensible body
In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the approach to medicine was vastly different from today. Health is now recognised, at least in most European countries, as a universal right, but what was it like in the past? How did social and political boundaries affect access to treatment, and what were the treatments of the day? This unit examines how Scottish healthcare institutions were influenced by these underlying social, economic, political and cultural contexts.
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Introduction
In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the approach to medicine was vastly different from today. Health is now recognised, at least in most European countries, as a universal right, but what was it like in the past? How did social and political boundaries affect access to treatment, and what were the treatments of the day? This unit examines how Scottish healthcare institutions were influenced by these underlying social, economic, political and cultural contexts.
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3 Conclusion
In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the approach to medicine was vastly different from today. Health is now recognised, at least in most European countries, as a universal right, but what was it like in the past? How did social and political boundaries affect access to treatment, and what were the treatments of the day? This unit examines how Scottish healthcare institutions were influenced by these underlying social, economic, political and cultural contexts.
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2. Designing for Cuba: Necessary In(ter)vention (April 11, 2008)
science, computer, technology, research, political, social, design, digital, device, government, Sneakernet, socialism, security, economy, barter, development, entrepreneurship, intranet, green, blog, IT, flash drive, change, internet, web, Fidel Castro,
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Learning outcomes
This unit considers the type of care offered in hospitals, using Leeds General Hospital as a case study. The unit looks at the people who have roles within the hospital, how they interact with each other and patients and what they consider to be 'care'. The different approaches and contributions to care by doctors and nurses are explored and patients give their perspective on the care they receive.
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Tackling the spread of HIV in South Africa
There are more cases of HIV infection in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa than in Botswana and Uganda combined. Led Professor Marie-Louise Newell (UCL Institute of Child Health), the Africa Centre for Health & Population Studies in KwaZulu-Natal not only treats those in the area with HIV but also gives testing and studies the spread of the virus in order to tackle the epidemic. The Africa Centre is a research centre of the University of KwaZulu Natal and is funded largely by the Wellcome Trust. http:
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OSU Campus Recycling
Oregon State University Campus Recycling collects recyclables during every home football game with help from volunteers. About 10,000 pounds per game are recycled!
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Peter Cook Remembered
Local businessman and philanthropist Peter Cook, who generously support GRCC, passed away on Sunday, November 28, 2010. We remember he and his wife Pat's generosity as we listen to Peter reflect on the value of a community college.
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Chapter 23 - Part 2
Insurance
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Japancast HD Video Episode 025 – Learn Japanese @ Japancast.net
Japancast HD Video Episode 025 from Hitomi Griswold on Vimeo. If you’re interested in Tekkon Kinkreet, pick it up at Amazon: Tekkon Kinkreet Help us grow! Share this post on your favorite social site:
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7.1 Some basic principles of religious studies

Remember that in Section 4 I suggested that possible reasons for studying religion could be clustered together under two broad headings:

  1. to understand the society in which we live, the culture we inherit and the wider world of which we are a part;

  2. as part of a personal quest for religious self-fulfilment.

I also suggested that these different reasons might lead to
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