Patterns and Fingerprints
Students apply several methods developed to identify and interpret patterns to the identification of fingerprints. They look at their classmates' fingerprints, snowflakes, and “spectral fingerprints” of elements. They learn to identify each image as unique, yet part of a group containing recognizable similarities.
Author(s): Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP

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Glue Sticks Bend & Twist
Students use hot glue gun sticks to learn about the forces of tension, compression and torsion.
Author(s): K-12 Outreach Office,

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Copyright 2011 - K-12 Outreach Office, Worcester Polytechnic Institute,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Drum Roll Please
This lesson gives students hands-on experience making a presentation, and allows them to present and defend their final decision to the class. Students commit to a final decision early in the lesson, then justify that decision. After making their decision they prepare their final presentations.
Author(s): Adventure Engineering,

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Asteroid Impact
Asteroid Impact is an 8-10 class long (350-450 min) earth science curricular unit where student teams are posed with the scenario that an asteroid will impact earth. They must design the location and size of underground caverns to save the people from uninhabitable earth for one year. Driven by this adventure scenario, student teams (1) explore general and geological maps, (2) determine the area of their classroom to help determine the cavern size required, (3) learn about map scales, (4) test r
Author(s): Adventure Engineering,

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Swinging Pendulum
This activity demonstrates how potential energy (PE) can be converted to kinetic energy (KE) and back again. Given a pendulum height, students calculate and predict how fast the pendulum will swing by understanding conservation of energy and using the equations for PE and KE. The equations are justified as students experimentally measure the speed of the pendulum and compare theory with reality.
Author(s): Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

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Copyright 2011 - Integrated Teaching and Learning Program, College of Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Next Steps
Frightened of the internet? This unit will help you make effective use of the internet, giving you the basic skills required for using web-based resources. Useful tricks and tips are provided as well as information on web browsers, the main features of a browser window, how to look at websites, using hyperlinks, searching for information on the internet, copying text, avoiding computer viruses, and using PDFs.
Author(s): The Open University

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5.1.6 Only use reputable software and programs
Frightened of the internet? This unit will help you make effective use of the internet, giving you the basic skills required for using web-based resources. Useful tricks and tips are provided as well as information on web browsers, the main features of a browser window, how to look at websites, using hyperlinks, searching for information on the internet, copying text, avoiding computer viruses, and using PDFs.
Author(s): The Open University

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Lois McNay: Political Ontologies and Radical Democracy
Humanitas Visiting Professorship Symposium on Women's Rights Professor Lois McNay (Professor of Theory of Politics and Fellow of Somerville College, University of Oxford) Political Ontologies and Radical Democracy www.crassh.cam.ac.uk
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Discovering Properties of Matter
What is matter? How do we define it? What are some of its properties that we can measure? Come learn all about this fundamental piece of science in this Wowie clip from the Children's Museum of Houston. Cynthia briefly discusses the following properties of matter: shape, texture, magnetism, fluorescence, and mass.  (0:59)
Author(s): No creator set

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Virtual Maths - 2D Shapes, triangle
Interactive simulation demonstrating calculation of area of a triangle
Author(s): Leeds Metropolitan University

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Nonlinear Studies of Coronal Heating by the Resonant Absorption of Alfven Waves
A series of animations showing various quantities from a coronal heating simulation
Author(s): No creator set

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Compilation of FTIR Materials
Provides excellent tutorials on the principles of IR absorption, interpretation of spectra for structure determination, a spectral peak wizard, an authoritative glossary of spectroscopic terms, and links tutorials on how FT instruments work.
Author(s): Michael C. Martin

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VIs y funciones de bajo nivel para File I/O
En este módulo, se aprenderá a usar los VIs y funciones de bajo nivel para la entrada/salida con ficheros.
Author(s): Juan Martínez

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6 Conclusion

As you moved through the various techniques we can use to analyse media texts in Sections 2 to Section 4, you should have discovered how rich even the simplest text can be in its drawing on political, social and cultural meanings discernible by close attention. Textual analysis enables you to register and negotiate the polysemy of texts and to see how the preferred reading is not the only one available. The preferred reading may be given prominence, however, by anchoring or by the genre chose
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2.3 The representation of ‘celebrity’

We have already seen the way in which texts gain meaning from other texts by the operation of contrast, but multiple texts are useful to the textual analyst in another way. Looking at a large number of texts dealing with the same subject – celebrity – enables us to detect common themes and narratives (stories), to the extent that with enough repetition we become able to talk about the representation of that subject. Working through a large number of texts about celebrities, we beco
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7.1 Evidence required

This Part is about showing that you can develop a strategy for using and improving your information literacy skills, monitor your progress, and evaluate your overall strategy and performance. The evidence you present must show what you have done as you worked through the processes of planning strategically, monitoring, evaluating and presenting your work. Part A must relate directly to the work you have selected for Part B.

You must present evidence to show you can:


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242 GG "Like" Versus "Such As"
Learn when to use "like" and when to use "such as." Find out why "like" should be used for comparisons and "such as' should be used for examples and how to use commas with "such as." The Grammar Girl print book is now available on Amazon.com! http://tinyurl.com/2pkej7
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The Botany Of Desire: A Plant's Eye View Of The World
How botanist use new technology to help plants survive. A one minute video that, at best, provides some insights into that a botanist does.
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5.2.2 Identify the outcomes you hope to achieve

An outcome is the result or consequence of a process. For example, you may want to integrate information resulting from CD-Rom and Internet searches into a report, and to do this you may need to improve your word-processing skills. In this case your report is an outcome, and using your IT skills is part of the process by which you achieve that outcome.

Try to express the outcomes you hope to achieve as clearly and accurately as possible, asking others for help and comments if necessary.
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Podcasting
This case study describes the use of pod casts to support and enhance student decision making in the development and running of a new simulated company using business simulation software
Author(s): Creator not set

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