1.4 Sexuality, parenthood and social policy

Just as procreative sexuality within marriage has rarely been the focus of historical research, as a social phenomenon it has also been viewed as inherently unproblematic in terms of social policy. Unlike today, there was very little explicit legislation or public policy that directly addressed the ‘private’ sphere of marriage and family during the fertility decline. However, there were a number of broad social policy formations that made assumptions and reinforced dominant messages
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1.1 Declining fertility

In Britain, fertility decline occurred roughly between 1860 and 1930 – a span which includes the middle and end of the Victorian period (1860–1900), the Edwardian period (1900–1914), the First World War (1914–1918) and the 1920s. We will focus on the British experience, although a similar phenomenon has been noted in many other parts of the world. Fertility decline, also known as the demographic transition, is characterised by a shift from a ‘traditional’ norm of large famili
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Allometry: Size and its consequences or... Why aren't there 20 foot tall ants?
Evolution has resulted in changes in the sizes and forms of organisms. Everything about the biology of an animal, including its physiology, anatomy, and ecology, is influenced by its body size. Frequently there seem to be limits on the sizes that different organisms can attain, even when larger size might be thought to be evolutionarily advantageous. Often an increase or decrease in size is correlated with a change in proportions. Understanding the significance of a particular morphology or inte
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Life on the Moon
In this lesson, students learn about the physical properties of the Moon. They compare these to the properties of the Earth to determine how life would be different for astronauts living on the Moon. Using their understanding of these differences, they are asked to think about what types of products engineers would need to design for us to live comfortably on the Moon.
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Activity 3: Your own national culture
We know that culture guides the way people behave in society as a whole. But culture also plays a key role in organisations, which have their own unique set of values, beliefs and ways of doing business. This unit explores the concepts of national and organisational culture and the factors that influence both.
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Activity 2: Differences between national culture and organisational culture
We know that culture guides the way people behave in society as a whole. But culture also plays a key role in organisations, which have their own unique set of values, beliefs and ways of doing business. This unit explores the concepts of national and organisational culture and the factors that influence both.
Author(s): The Open University

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Activity 1: Defining culture
We know that culture guides the way people behave in society as a whole. But culture also plays a key role in organisations, which have their own unique set of values, beliefs and ways of doing business. This unit explores the concepts of national and organisational culture and the factors that influence both.
Author(s): The Open University

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6 Summary
Legacy fundraising, big-gift seeking are all part of the professional fundraiser's role. This unit will help you to gain the skills necessary to persuade individuals to become donors. How do you change people's ideas about methods of giving, moving them from casual street donations to regular direct debit giving?
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4.1 Introduction
Legacy fundraising, big-gift seeking are all part of the professional fundraiser's role. This unit will help you to gain the skills necessary to persuade individuals to become donors. How do you change people's ideas about methods of giving, moving them from casual street donations to regular direct debit giving?
Author(s): The Open University

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3.6.2 Listening and responding to what donors and supporters say
Legacy fundraising, big-gift seeking are all part of the professional fundraiser's role. This unit will help you to gain the skills necessary to persuade individuals to become donors. How do you change people's ideas about methods of giving, moving them from casual street donations to regular direct debit giving?
Author(s): The Open University

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3.4 The ‘flanker’ effect

A potential problem for the feature integration theory is the fact that the time taken to understand the meaning of a printed word can be influenced by other, nearby words. Of itself, this is not surprising, because it is well known that one word can prime (i.e. speed decisions to) another related word; the example nurse – doctor was given in Section 1.4. However, Shaffer and LaBerge (1979) found priming effects, even when t
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Acknowledgements

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Texts

Section 1.3 Case Study: extracted from Faludy, T. and Faludy, A. (1996) A Little Edge of Darkness, Jessi
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Scaling the Map: Activity
Students will learn how to determine map distances and map areas using the map scale. They will also get a better feel for how much an area represents on the map in relation to the size they are suggesting for their cavern.
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Acknowledgements

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce material in this unit:

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References

Barnes, P. (1985) E206 Personality, Development and Learning, Unit 1, Raising Questions, Milton Keynes, The Open University.
Bradley, B.S. (1989) Visions of Infancy, Cambridge, Polity.
British Psychological Society (2000) Code of Conduct, Ethical Principles and Guidelines, Leicester, British Psychological Society.
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The Making of the Modern Marine Corps
http://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog.php?isbn=9780674058279 The Marine Corps has always considered itself a breed apart. Since 1775 America's smallest armed service has been suspicious of outsiders and deeply loyal to its traditions. Undying faith in its exceptionalism made the Marines one of the sharpest, swiftest tools of American military power, but developing this brand did not come without costs. Aaron B. O'Connell, Assistant Professor of History at the United States Naval Academy and a lieut
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Is the Universe Designed? - a Theist's View
Revd Dr Rodney Holder : Course
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Organic agriculture training program in Ecuador.

Two young agronomists organised an organic agriculture training program in Ecuador. Many Ecuadorian farmers learnt how to apply organic agricultural techniques in order to produce organic high quality products.
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Eisenhower Proclaims Alaska the 49th State
On January 3, 1959, President Eisenhower presides over the ceremony welcoming the territory of Alaska into the Union as the 49th and largest state. (1:03)
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Sports Car Aerodynamics: Spoiler Alert
This video describes how a spoiler on a sports car affects its performance.  It explains how spoilers help to direct air flow and reduce the amount of air flowing underneath the vehicle. It also explains the forces of lift and drag created as air flows around different shapes.   (8:16)
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