Pulsus Paradoxus: Explanation #2
The pulsus paradoxus maneuver has two physiologic explanations. The second relates to the effect of negative pleural pressure on the myocardium during inspiration.
Author(s): Grace Huang, MD

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Rights not set

1963 Timesharing: A Solution to Computer Bottlenecks
[Recorded: May 9, 1963] This vintage film features MIT Science Reporter John Fitch at the MIT Computation Center in an extended interview with MIT professor of computer science Fernando J. Corbato. The film was co-produced by WGBH (Boston) and MIT. The prime focus of the film is timesharing, one of the most important developments in computing, and one which has come in and out of favor several times over the last several decades as the dichotomy between remote and centrally-managed computing r
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British Directors at the 54th BFI London Film Festival - Part 2
In the lead up to the 54th BFI London Film Festival, we speak to another group of British filmmakers whose work has been included in the festival programme. Clio Barnard, director of The Arbor, explains how she decided to explore the life of Bradford playwright Andrea Dunbar through a combination of archive footage, a performance of Dunbar's play of the same name, and interviews from the writer's family. Jamie Thraves, who wrote and directed Treacle Jr, talks about his third feature, which inclu
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Boom Britain - Documenting the Nation's Life on Film
A landmark project that will transform our understanding of British documentary cinema post-1945 encompassing a season at BFI Southbank, a 4-disc DVD boxset, a new book, a Mediatheque collection and a touring programme of extraordinary films. Find out more at http://www.bfi.org.uk/boombritain.html
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Ken Loach Keynote Speech
The 54th BFI London Film Festival's keynote speech, held in conjunction with Skillset, was given by one of Britain's finest and most revered directors, Ken Loach. Loach spoke eloquently and passionately to the Festival audience about the industry he loves and has invested so much in, and presented a call to action for those who share that love to help protect it from forces of destruction and decay. Loach never shies from sharing the force of his opinions, and provides a rousing and inspiring su
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The 54th BFI London Film Festival Vodcast Day 7
Day 7 of the 54th BFI London Film Festival included the UK premiere of Robinson In Ruins, the highly anticipated film from British director Patrick Keiller. Ryan Fleck also presented It's Kind Of A Funny Story, starring Zack Galifianakis, and Indian actor and director Aamir Bashir was on hand to introduce his debut feature Autumn, the story of a young man struggling to come to terms with the loss of his brother Kashmir. The evening culminated in the Mayfair Hotel Gala presentation of West Is Wes
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The 54th BFI London Film Festival Vodcast Day 8
On day 8 of the festival we looked at a range of British films and filmmakers. At BFI Southbank, the Breaking with Convention event featured key British talent discussing their use of form. Documentary filmmaker Kim Longinotto also presented her latest work Pink Saris, which focuses on a group of Indian female vigilantes as well as the women that turn to them in desperation. The Archive Gala featured The Great White Silence by Herbert Ponting, comprised of haunting footage from Captain Scott's l
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The 54th BFI London Film Festival Vodcast Day 15
On Day 15 the BFI London Film Festival held its second annual Awards ceremony. The Best British Newcomer Award, in partnership with Swarovski, was presented by Andy Serkis and went to Clio Barnard, for The Arbor. The Sutherland Award for the most original feature debut was presented by Michael Winterbottom and Olivia Williams and also went to Clio Barnard for the Arbor. The Grierson Award for best documentary was presented by Jon Snow and went to Janus Metz for Armadillo. The Best Film Award, in
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8.4 Hinduism in eastern India: religion in Calcutta

The Hinduism of Bengal, as in other regions of India with their own languages and distinctive historical traditions, has absorbed and retained many local elements which make it peculiarly the Hinduism of Bengal. The city of Calcutta has exerted its own considerable influence upon the surrounding region. Calcutta, the capital of West Bengal, was founded in 1690 originally as a British trading post on the Hugli, a stretch of the Ganges (or Ganga), a river sacred to Hindus (see Author(s): No creator set

6.1 Introduction

Whatever else they may be, religions grow in historical and social settings. The present form of a religion has its roots in the past. Religion can exercise a strong influence upon society and the cultural forms of a society, but religion itself is no less affected by changes and pressures within society. Religion gives meaning to a pattern of living and may even be responsible for establishing a certain lifestyle or distinctive social organisation or institution. At the same time, religion o
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Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

4.3 The changing face of belief

The religious life of post-war Britain has become more varied, although Christianity in different forms remains the most influential religion. Yet, the influence of Christianity over British institutions has declined greatly over the last century and a half, although both England and Scotland still retain Established Author(s): No creator set

1.1 The videos: religion in Liverpool

The following clips take a look at religion in Liverpool. You will hear people with different beliefs speaking for themselves. This will provide you with the ‘raw data’ of religion as lived.

The clips are intended to provoke reflection and discussion, including disagreement, about the topic of religion.

At its simplest level the video clips provide descriptive insights into the beliefs and practices of a range of communities in the city of Liverpool. It thus provides a vi
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Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

Alternate reality game pioneer Elan Lee on Media Space - Wednesday, October 26 at 9 p.m.
This new program from UWTV and the Masters of Communication in Digital Media is hosted by award-winning TV correspondent and UW Professor Hanson Hosein. Media Space engages thought leaders on the hottest issues of the digital media age -- technology, entrepreneurship, community and entertainment. Scheduled to appear during the series are industry trend-setters like Ben Huh of the Cheezburger Network, Elan Lee of Fourth Wall Studios, Kate James of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and web entre
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Flights carry hope of improving ties
Japan's former Prime Minister Shinzo Abe arrives in Taiwan on the first direct flight from Tokyo in 30 years.
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BA returns to profit
British Airways syas it expects to deliver further growth in 2011 after posting its first profit in two years
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John Krish on 'The Elephant Will Never Forget' (1953)
One of Britain's great postwar documentary filmmakers, John Krish, talks about the making of his classic British Transport Films documentary 'The Elephant Will Never Forget' (1953)... and why, despite it going on to become of the best-loved titles in the BTF catalogue, he lost his job over it. This is an extract from 'Perspectives on Documentary Filmmaking', a brand new documentary that was created for inclusion in the four-disc DVD box 'Shadows of Progress: Documentary Film in Post-War Britain
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UK manufacturing rises unexpectedly
British manufacturing peaked in October after 10 month lows, up 54.9, but public spending cuts and job losses may still affect growth.
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UK: a nation of digital shop keepers
An independant report commissioned by US search engine Google and carried out by Boston Consulting Group, shows the internet is worth £100 bln to the British economy and an estimated 7.2 percent of GDP.
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5.2 Wilberforce’s anti-slavery campaign in context
William Wilberforce, the politician and religious writer, was instrumental in the abolition of slavery in Britain in 1807. This unit explores Wilberforce’s career and writings and assesses their historical significance. In particular it examines the contribution that Evangelicalism, the religious tradition to which Wilberforce belonged, made in the transitions between the Enlightenment and Romanticism. Throughout it relates Wilberforce’s career and writings to wider social and cultural devel
Author(s): The Open University

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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

5.1 Leading the fight against slavery
William Wilberforce, the politician and religious writer, was instrumental in the abolition of slavery in Britain in 1807. This unit explores Wilberforce’s career and writings and assesses their historical significance. In particular it examines the contribution that Evangelicalism, the religious tradition to which Wilberforce belonged, made in the transitions between the Enlightenment and Romanticism. Throughout it relates Wilberforce’s career and writings to wider social and cultural devel
Author(s): The Open University

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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2