Crustaceans: Shrimp
Two reasons why shrimp are considered to be crustaceans is because they have two pairs of antennae and jointed legs.
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Coyote (Canis latrans)
Coyotes are top consumers in any food web, meaning they eat primary producers (plants) and consumers such as insects, spiders, toads, small mammals (chipmunks, skunks, and mice), and large mammals (deer). No animals eat coyotes, except maybe the occasional human.
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Abe Berebitsky Fertilizer Works, Fulton County, Indiana
Abe Berebitsky built a fertilizer factory near Rochester by the Tippecanoe River in 1915, and sold it for $10,000 in 1919. Today toxicity from tires for the making of fertilizer is a concern, but here the factory trucks are shown loaded with tires.,Fulton County Journey
Author(s): Manning, L.L., Rochester, Indiana

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Digital Image © 2009 Indiana Historical Society. All Rights Reserved.

APW2011 - The Transformation of Economic and Political Power in Asia and the Pacific
This is the opening session of Asia Pacific Week 2011, recorded on Monday 11 July 2011 - The Australian National University This opening panel for APW and will look at how China's increasing growth is re-shaping the balance of economic power both regionally and globally, while critically analysing its political implications. The Panel will be led by five of the world's most influential academics on the Asia-Pacific region: Professor Peter Drysdale, Professor Hugh White, Professor Deborah Braut
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The science behind wheeled sports
This unit focuses on cycling and wheelchair racing: what we might collectively call 'wheeled sports'. The Scientific concepts such as force, acceleration and speed are also useful for understanding these sports. However, cycling and wheelchair racing differ from the sports you have studied so far in that technology more obviously plays an important role.
Author(s): The Open University

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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

Episode 114: Growing bodily tissues: An engineering perspective

Biomolecular engineer Associate Professor Andrea O'Connor discusses the engineering behind growing tissues and organs. With science host Dr Shane Huntington.