Bacteriophage T4
This is a highly accurate visualization of the Bacteriophage T4 based on Cryo-EM datasets of the virus. The scope of the animation is to show the infection process of the T4 into an E. coli cell. All scientific data sets and motion based off of research from Michael Rossmann Laboratory (Purdue University). Courtesy of Seyet LLC.
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A semaphorin code defines subpopulations of spinal motor neurons during mouse development.
In the spinal cord, motor neurons (MNs) with similar muscle targets and sensory inputs are grouped together into motor pools. To date, relatively little is known about the molecular mechanisms that control the establishment of pool-specific circuitry. Semaphorins, a large family of secreted and cell surface proteins, are important mediators of developmental processes such as axon guidance and cell migration. Here, we used mRNA in situ hybridization to study the expression patterns of semaphorins
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The Microbial Biorealm
The Microbial Biorealm is an informational site about microbes written by students for students. Hosted by Kenyon College, the site includes molecular and taxonomic information about microbes from all three domains of life. A comprehensive table lists the properties and characteristics of each domain of life while taxonomy pages list classification, description, significance, genome structure, cell structure, metabolism, ecology, isolation, cultivation, and references specific to individual taxa
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Red Tide Activities
Welcome to Making Waves, a multimedia approach to learning that offers teachers and students an insider's view of current, relevant ocean science research efforts. This University of South Florida web site contains links to the article "Tiny Toxic Terrors: Harmful Algal Blooms" and four computer-based activities that teach students about various aspects of red tide. Activities include: "Where could they be?," "Is it a plant or animal cell?," "What is bioluminescence?," and "How does plankton sha
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Algae Experiments
The material found at this site provides original, multidisciplinary, inquiry-based ideas to help enrich science teaching using the world famous Great Salt Lake as a springboard theme. During the lesson students will have the opportunity to view two types of algae (fresh water and Great Salt Lake species) under 400x magnification with a compound microscope. Students will make observations and record their observations on a recording sheet where they will describe what they see through drawing a
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20.441J Biomaterials-Tissue Interactions (MIT)
This course covers the principles of materials science and cell biology underlying the design of medical implants, artificial organs, and matrices for tissue engineering. Methods for biomaterials surface characterization and analysis of protein adsorption on biomaterials. Molecular and cellular interactions with biomaterials are analyzed in terms of unit cell processes, such as matrix synthesis, degradation, and contraction. Mechanisms underlying wound healing and tissue remodeling following imp
Author(s): Ioannis Yannas,Myron Spector

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Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative C

CuraÁao
CuraÁao is a computer program that simulates the sterile insect release method (SIRM) of pest population suppression, first conceived by E. F. Knipling (1955). The user can investigate the effects of several variables on the effectiveness of the method and discover what happens when some of the basic assumptions of the model are relaxed or violated in some way. The user should gain some understanding of the sorts of things that complicate the application of the technique in situations that are
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Cell Differentials
Cell Differentials offers a visual dataset of white blood cells that gives students practice in developing strategies and techniques for the recognition of these blood cell types. Over 100 different cell images are randomly presented with feedback on successful identification. In traditional labs, the recognition of white blood cell types can be compromised by several factors. Developmental changes can make recognition difficult and some cell types exhibit similar features. Microscopy can be a
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Medicine Games: Incredible Megacell Game
Play a game and find out about a Nobel Prize awarded discovery or work! The compartments of the cell, the organelles, are so small that it was impossible to study their structure until the electron microscope became available in 1938. Albert Claude, Christian de Duve and George E. Palade were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1974 for developing methods making it possible to take a closer look at the organelles and for discovering some of them.
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Privacy
Though it brings us many benefits, the march of technology makes an encompassing surveillance network seem almost inevitable, and radically changes our expectations of privacy. We owe many of the expectations of privacy we used to enjoy to a combination of immature technology and insufficient manpower to monitor us. But these protective inefficiencies are giving way to technologies of data processing and digital surveillance that will change our beliefs about privacy. We are widely tracked by pu
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Essential Science for Teachers: Life Science: Session 2. Classifying Living Things
How can we make sense of the living world? During this session, a systematic approach to biological classification is introduced as a starting point for understanding the nature of the remarkable diversity of life on Earth.,This clip is a graphic showing the basis for photosynthesis.
Author(s): Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

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Cell Biology and Cancer
This curriculum supplement brings into the classroom new information about some of the exciting medical discoveries being made at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and their effects on public health. This set is being distributed to teachers around the country free of charge by the NIH to improve science literacy and to foster student interest in science. The first three supplements in the series are designed for use in senior high school science classrooms: Emerging and Re-emerging Infect
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Mitochondrial Control Region
Every human cell has a "second" genome, found in the cell's energy-generating organelle, the mitochondrion. In fact, each mitochondrion has several copies of its own genome, and there are several hundred to several thousand mitochondria per cell. This means that the mitochondrial (mt) genome is highly amplified. While each cell contains only two copies of a given nuclear gene (one on each of the paired chromosomes), there are thousands of copies of a given mt gene per cell. Because of this high
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(Video) Nobel Lecture Series - Eric Accili.
Eric Accili, SFU kinesiology professor, on work of Rod MacKinnon who won the Nobel Prize for Chemistry for producing an image of cell membrane channels.
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Assembly of Proteins in Membranes II from the course General Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
General Biochemistry and Molecular Biology - Fall 2006. This course covers molecular biology of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and their viruses. Mechanisms of DNA replication, transcription, translation. Structure of genes and chromosomes. Regulation of gene expression. Biochemical processes and principles in membrane structure and function, intracellular trafficking and subcellular compartmentation, cytoskeletal architecture, nucleocytoplasmic transport, signal transduction mechanisms, and c
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7.340 Regenerative Medicine: from Bench to Bedside (MIT)
Regenerative medicine involves the repair and regeneration of tissues for therapeutic purposes, such as replacing bone marrow in leukemia, cartilage in osteoarthritis or cells of the heart after a heart attack. In this course, we will explore basic mechanisms of how cells differentiate into specific tissues in response to a variety of biologic signaling molecules. We will discuss the use of such factors for in vitro tissue production. We will also study the cellular mechanisms involved in the cl
Author(s): Petra Simic

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Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative C

5.3.1 Allosteric regulation
In this unit we explore how proteins are the 'doers' of the cell. They are huge in number and variety and diverse in structure and function, serving both the structural building blocks and the functional machinery of the cell. Just about every process in every cell requires specific proteins. The basic principles of protein structure and function which are reviewed in this unit are crucial to understanding how proteins perform their various roles.
Author(s): The Open University

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Stem Cells: Programming and Personalized Medicine
After years of relentless lab work, rising and falling expectations, and the challenge of a sometimes hostile public, Rudolf Jaenisch says, “The scenario that looked like a fantasy … has come closer to reality. We can study complex human diseases in a Petri dish and potentially contribute to therapy.” In this l
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5.2 All proteins bind other molecules
In this unit we explore how proteins are the 'doers' of the cell. They are huge in number and variety and diverse in structure and function, serving both the structural building blocks and the functional machinery of the cell. Just about every process in every cell requires specific proteins. The basic principles of protein structure and function which are reviewed in this unit are crucial to understanding how proteins perform their various roles.
Author(s): The Open University

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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

Proteins
In this unit we explore how proteins are the 'doers' of the cell. They are huge in number and variety and diverse in structure and function, serving both the structural building blocks and the functional machinery of the cell. Just about every process in every cell requires specific proteins. The basic principles of protein structure and function which are reviewed in this unit are crucial to understanding how proteins perform their various roles.
Author(s): The Open University

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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2