National Middle School Science and Technology Bowl
Two competitions: an academic competition in which middle school students answer fast-paced questions about math and science (earth, physical, life, and general science) and a model fuel cell car competition that challenges students to design, build, and race model cars.
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Clearing Techniques for the Study of Vascular Plant Tissues in Whole Structures and Thick Sections
The clearing technique presented here in 4 exercises changes the refractive properties of various organelles without altering the structural integrity of the cells. It effects a refractive uniformity among cellular organelles so that their distinctive and contrasting features can be revealed with phase contrast and Nomarski interference microscopy or through selective staining in conjunction with bright field optics.
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Antibody-protein interactions: benchmark datasets and prediction tools evaluation
Background The ability to predict antibody binding sites (aka antigenic determinants or B-cell epitopes) for a given protein is a precursor to new vaccine design and diagnostics. Among the various methods of B-cell epitope identification X-ray crystallography is one of the most reliable methods. Using these experimental data computational methods exist for B-cell epitope prediction. As the number of structures of antibody-protein complexes grows, further interest in prediction methods using 3D s
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Improving Your Commute
Road traffic is a challenging societal problem, and with the increasing crowding of areas in and around cities, it is only becoming worse. With the proliferation of wireless connectivity, smartphones (think cheap embedded computers), it is now possible to continuously monitor urban areas using mobile sensors carried by people
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Virtual yeast cell
This rich learning object is used to introduce yeast cytology to students taking Module D24BS3 Brewery Yeast Management as part of the MSc in Brewing Science. The virtual cell permits the students to understand structure and function of yeast organelles.
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Human Cloning and Human Rights: Promises and Perils
Ignore the noisy debate around cloning, Rudolf Jaenisch quietly insists, and instead look closely at the biology involved. First, note that there are two different kinds of cloning: reproductive cloning, the attempt to create an exact replica of a human being, which Jaenisch believes to be both biologically flawed and morall
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αντιγραφή π,α,πα, π,ι,πι, τ,τα, πίτα, τα , πατατα

http://taksiasterati.blogspot.gr/

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UA Celebrates Sun Link Streetcar
On July 25, the UA was one of five stops along the Sun Link streetcar's ribbon-cutting ceremony route.
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Algal cell
This red algal cell (Chlamydomonas nivalis) gives mountain snow packs a red tint. It uses the pollutants in snow as food. It cannot be seen without a microscope.
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A Manual of Online Molecular Biology Techniques
This is a collection of tried-and-true technique descriptions used in teaching postgraduate students in the Department of Molecular & Cell Biology at UCT.
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What is the genome made of?
Genomes are composed of DNA, and a knowledge of the structure of DNA is essential to understand how it can function as hereditary material. DNA is remarkable, breathtakingly simple in its structure yet capable of directing all the living processes in a cell, the production of new cells and the development of a fertilized egg to an individual adult. DNA has three key properties: it is relatively stable; its structure suggests an obvious way in which the molecule can be duplicated, or replicated;
Author(s): The Open University

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Bio-engineered Animals and Models of Human Disease
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A celebration and critical evaluation of the work of Mark Philp: Roundtable
Speakers from this day event join in discussion with Mark Philp himself about some of the issues raised throughout the day. This discussion is taken from 'A celebration and critical evaluation of the work of Mark Philp'. Mark Philp was our founding Head of Department (2000-2005) and Tutorial Fellow at Oriel College (1983-2013). He is now, since 2013, Professor of History at the University of Warwick. His work in the fields of political thought and political theory are notable for their interdis
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Showcase: Oxford Stem cell Institute
Showcase: Oxford Stem cell Institute
Author(s): Paul Fairchild

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Chinese Grammar-Complement 结果补语
Chinese Grammar-Complement 结果补语.
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Coarse open celled aluminium foam produced by infiltration of sintered salt (FOAM-U-LIKE)
FOAM-U-LIKE (Foaming of aluminium metal using lightly interconnected kevelled elements) is a very inexpensive route for the production of coarse open celled foams. It allows a reasonable degree of control over cell size and shape, and results in relatively uniform morphology. The interconnectivity of pores can be controlled by varying the degree of sintering of the precursor. In this case, grains of 1-4mm diameter have been sintered at 600 degrees C for just 10 minutes, giving rise to lightly
Author(s): DoITPoMS, University of Cambridge,J A Curran, Depa

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5.3.3 Phosphorylation of proteins as a means of regulating activity
In this unit we explore how proteins are the 'doers' of the cell. They are huge in number and variety and diverse in structure and function, serving both the structural building blocks and the functional machinery of the cell. Just about every process in every cell requires specific proteins. The basic principles of protein structure and function which are reviewed in this unit are crucial to understanding how proteins perform their various roles.
Author(s): The Open University

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(Audio) Nobel Lecture Series - Eric Accili.
Eric Accili, SFU kinesiology professor, on work of Rod MacKinnon who won the Nobel Prize for Chemistry for producing an image of cell membrane channels.
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8.4 The organisation of the mitotic chromosome
This unit helps you understand the properties of nucleotides and how they contribute to secondary and tertiary structures of nucleic acids at the molecular level. You will learn about the different composition and roles of nucleic acids in the cell, their interactions with each other and the use of ribozymes, aptamers, antisense and hybridization as tools in molecular research. The unit covers the function of DNA packaging within the cell, the interactions between the DNA double helix and the nu
Author(s): The Open University

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8.3 Chromosome distribution within the nucleus
This unit helps you understand the properties of nucleotides and how they contribute to secondary and tertiary structures of nucleic acids at the molecular level. You will learn about the different composition and roles of nucleic acids in the cell, their interactions with each other and the use of ribozymes, aptamers, antisense and hybridization as tools in molecular research. The unit covers the function of DNA packaging within the cell, the interactions between the DNA double helix and the nu
Author(s): The Open University

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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2