Moore's Law Forever?
In 1965, Gordon Moore observed that the number of transistors on a silicon chip doubled every technology generation (12 months at that time, currently 18-24 months). He predicted that this trend would continue for a while. Forty years later, Moore's Law continues to hold. Since the number of transistors in a circuit is a measure of the circuit's computational power, the doubling of transistor counts compounded over a 40 year period has led to an enormous increase in the performance of electronic
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MacRetina
MacRetina simulates data from retinal ganglion cells in the eye to the brain. By sampling neural activity while stimulating the retina with small spots of light, students can see the dynamic excitatory and inhibitory responses of these neurons in the simulation, and map the organization of the retinal region that drives the cell's receptive field. MacRetina is modeled accurately on published data and is a realistic simulation of a lab experiment that would otherwise be beyond the reach of the
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1. Cell Biology, Embryology and Genetics (February 13, 2008)
Stem cell, medicine, health, disease, science, technology, research, clinical advances, controversy, ethics, law, society, politics, economics, social issue, religion, plasma, cytoplasm, nucleus, white blood cell, chromosome, gene expression, DNA, central
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2. Policy, Law and Society (February 20, 2008)
Stem cell, medicine, health, disease, science, technology, research, clinical advances, controversy, ethics, law, society, politics, economics, social issue, religion, plasma, cytoplasm, nucleus, white blood cell, chromosome, gene expression, DNA, central
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3. New Research Direction (February 27, 2008)
Stem cell, medicine, health, disease, science, technology, research, clinical advances, controversy, ethics, law, society, politics, economics, social issue, religion, plasma, cytoplasm, nucleus, white blood cell, chromosome, gene expression, DNA, central
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4. Towards the Clinic - Stem Cell (March 5, 2008)
Stem cell, medicine, health, disease, science, technology, research, clinical advances, controversy, ethics, law, society, politics, economics, social issue, religion, plasma, cytoplasm, nucleus, white blood cell, chromosome, gene expression, DNA, central
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5. The New Ethics of Stem Cell Research (March 12, 2008)
Stem cell, medicine, health, disease, science, technology, research, clinical advances, controversy, ethics, law, society, politics, economics, social issue, religion, plasma, cytoplasm, nucleus, white blood cell, chromosome, gene expression, DNA, central
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1. Cell Biology, Genetics, Embryology (June 25, 2007)
Stem cell, medicine, health, disease, science, technology, research, clinical advances, controversy, ethics, law, society, politics, economics, social issue, religion, plasma, cytoplasm, nucleus, white blood cell, chromosome, gene expression, DNA, central
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2. Five Important Research Advances (July 2, 2007)
Stem cell, medicine, health, disease, science, technology, research, clinical advances, controversy, ethics, law, society, politics, economics, social issue, religion, plasma, cytoplasm, nucleus, white blood cell, chromosome, gene expression, DNA, central
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3. Five Clinical Advances (July 9, 2007)
Stem cell, medicine, health, disease, science, technology, research, clinical advances, controversy, ethics, law, society, politics, economics, social issue, religion, plasma, cytoplasm, nucleus, white blood cell, chromosome, gene expression, DNA, central
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4. The Ethics of Stem Cell Research (July 16, 2007)
Stem cell, medicine, health, disease, science, technology, research, clinical advances, controversy, ethics, law, society, politics, economics, social issue, religion, plasma, cytoplasm, nucleus, white blood cell, chromosome, gene expression, DNA, central
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The Future of Medicine: Thinking Small
The use of nanobiotechnology in medicine is termed “nanomedicine.” Dr. Maysinger will discuss current advances in nanomedicine research, including targeted cancer therapies, localized drug delivery, and improved cell-material interactions for imaging of brain cells.
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Bonding With Bugs
Nathalie Tufenkji (Department of Chemical Engineering) discusses her work aimed at preventing binding of infectious organisms to medical devices and to mammalian cell surfaces using an active component of cranberries.
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Work
A circus strongman and a clown help present the physics definition of work. Concept: Work = force x distance. Eureka was a series of short cartoons on physics that ran on public television in the 1980's.  The video explains the concept in simple and well illustrated way.  Good for students of any elementary school level. 
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7. Computational Photography and the Stanford Frankencamera (November 6, 2009)
computer science, technology, humanities, internet, math, frankencamera, digital, film, camera, art, pixel, image resize, graphics, exposure, print, all-focus algorithm, filter, color, telephoto lens, focus, refocus, flutter shutter, program, SDK, cell ph
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2. Construction of De Novo Biological Process Control Circuits: Parts & Engineering Principles (Octo
science, technology, biology, molecular lock, engineering, genetics, protein, circuits, DNA, logic elements, causal condition, clock, loop, sequence, genome, binding, cell, spooling lock, HIV, virus, regulation, cancer
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Introduction
Genomes are composed of DNA, and a knowledge of the structure of DNA is essential to understand how it can function as hereditary material. DNA is remarkable, breathtakingly simple in its structure yet capable of directing all the living processes in a cell, the production of new cells and the development of a fertilized egg to an individual adult. DNA has three key properties: it is relatively stable; its structure suggests an obvious way in which the molecule can be duplicated, or replicated;
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2.2 Chaperones help polypeptides to fold
In this unit we explore how proteins are the 'doers' of the cell. They are huge in number and variety and diverse in structure and function, serving both the structural building blocks and the functional machinery of the cell. Just about every process in every cell requires specific proteins. The basic principles of protein structure and function which are reviewed in this unit are crucial to understanding how proteins perform their various roles.
Author(s): The Open University

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3.4 The functional domains of Src
In this unit we explore how proteins are the 'doers' of the cell. They are huge in number and variety and diverse in structure and function, serving both the structural building blocks and the functional machinery of the cell. Just about every process in every cell requires specific proteins. The basic principles of protein structure and function which are reviewed in this unit are crucial to understanding how proteins perform their various roles.
Author(s): The Open University

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2.4 Analysis of nucleic acids by electrophoresis and hybridisation
This unit helps you understand the properties of nucleotides and how they contribute to secondary and tertiary structures of nucleic acids at the molecular level. You will learn about the different composition and roles of nucleic acids in the cell, their interactions with each other and the use of ribozymes, aptamers, antisense and hybridization as tools in molecular research. The unit covers the function of DNA packaging within the cell, the interactions between the DNA double helix and the nu
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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2