Principles of Macroeconomics
This book is intended for a one-semester course in Macroeconomics taught out the social sciences or business school. The authors take a three-pronged approach to every concept: (1) the concept is covered with a "Heads Up" to ward off confusion, (2) a "You Try It" section makes sure students are staying on top of the concept and (3) a "Case and Point" section that uses a real-world application to harness the concept in reality
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Opening up 'Illiberal' Regimes: do media and communications matter?
Even in closed authoritarian systems, or 'illiberal' regimes, spaces exist for civil society activity, debate, and networking. Accelerated by globalisation, this process is enabled by diverse actors using traditional and new communications tools, often challenging the status quo.
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Making Research Relevant: Keynote Panel.
This keynote panel is part of the LSE PhD Poster Exhibition: Relating Research to Reality hosted on May 26 in the NAB. The panel will speak to the theme of the PhD Poster Exhibition, exploring diverse approaches to engagement between academia and wider society.
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Innovation Spotlight: Bringing Children’s Media off the Screen
Working with motors, sensors, sophisticated algorithms and fuzzy puppets, Cynthia Breazeal may finally realize one of childhood’s fondest dreams: imaginary characters that assume a physical reality, and stories that leap from the page into three dimensions.

Virtual play can take a child only so far, suggests

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Stem Cells: Programming and Personalized Medicine
After years of relentless lab work, rising and falling expectations, and the challenge of a sometimes hostile public, Rudolf Jaenisch says, “The scenario that looked like a fantasy … has come closer to reality. We can study complex human diseases in a Petri dish and potentially contribute to therapy.” In this l
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The Power of Competition: How to Focus the World’s Brains on your Innovation Challenges
Cooperation may be making us “a little bit too nice” when it comes to innovation, suggests Fiona Murray. She believes there’s nothing like competition for injecting energy into the process of solving key innovation problems, whether in business or society.

Murray is convinced competition make ventures “more ef

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Deep Brain Stimulation Therapy for Movement Disorders
New tools are enabling neuroscientists to break therapeutic ground against daunting disorders like Parkinson’s Disease (PD). Andres Lozano is one “of a small group of heroes,” in Ann Graybiel’s estimate, whose work is yielding astonishing advances on a variety of fronts.

Treatments for PD, a progressiv

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How Can We Improve Disaster Response?

Even if the U.S. draws the right lessons from Hurricane Katrina, panelists suggest, the nation may still be caught short in the next disaster.

In some areas of government, Kenneth Oye points out, “weaknesses can go on for a long time because you don’t confront a reality test. Katrina was a reality test wi

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Yes We Must: Achieve Diversity through Leadership-Keynote
Two “sisters” -- both university chiefs -- celebrate the victory of the first African-American U.S. President, but remind listeners that American institutions have not yet achieved the full measure of Martin Luther King, Jr.’s dream.

MIT, which prides itself on inventing the future, says Susan Hockfield, must

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NOTES ON IN-SITU ? FULL-SCALE EXPERIMENTATION AND THE DESIGN PROFESSIONS
In the north american academic context a workshop is different from a paper session in that it is simply an opportunity to exchange ideas and to raise questions among colleagues who can bring to bear in their discussion various points of view and experiences otherwise unavailable.
Author(s): Amiel, Maurice

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Why Psychiatry has to be Social - Audio
Professor Bebbington explores the idea that psychiatry has an essentially social component because the phenomenon it seeks to explain have inherently social attributes. Psychiatric symptoms relate to our internal experience of external reality, and therefore comprise elements of both the internal and external world. A full account of psychiatric disorder must invoke the interaction of biological and social factors, acknowledging that the balance between these factors will vary between individual
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Plenaries
Plenaries The national strategy seems to insist that every lesson follows the 3 part format of starter, main activity, plenary. As an AST in tend to network with colleagues in other schools where the view for specialist ICT teachers is that plenaries are often inappropriate in the context of ICT lessons where pupils are working on ongoing coursework tasks [e.g building and documenting a database for GCSE coursework over a series of lessons for 2 months]. Plenaries seem to be effective in lesson
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Promoting group talk and higher-order thinking in pupils by coaching secondary English trainee teach
The aim of the project was to investigate whether the quality of pupils’ group talk and higher-order thinking at KS3 could be developed by giving additional training and coaching to a group of self-selected trainees. The project aimed to develop the trainees’ skills in planning challenging tasks for pupils’ group talk in English; and in promoting effective talk through the use of pupil ‘ground-rules’ and varied teacher discourse strategies, drawn from research and the participants’ p
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Urban ITT: Working With Urban Schools In Challenging Contexts (R&DA 2: 17)
The purpose of this project was to contribute to the training of teachers for work in urban schools facing a range of disadvantages. The research was conducted in Manchester and London and undertaken with teachers at the beginning of their careers and the mentors who supported them. 162 trainees were surveyed and eight case studies investigated issues in more depth. The project found that many trainees started and ended their training wanting to teach in challenging urban settings but that th
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Science Education in School Issues, Evidence and Proposals
This report advocates the need for significant change in secondary science education to provide ‘science education for citizenship’ rather than an elitist education for a few. The belief is that significant change in practice could bring about an increase in the scientific literacy of the whole population whilst simultaneously producing enough highly qualified scientists and technicians to meet the future needs of the UK in a global economy. The report advocates change so that it becomes ‘
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Without the Golden Handcuffs: Identity and belonging in challenging schools
This paper was first presented at the British Educational Research Association Annual Conference in 2009. The paper is part of the doctoral research conducted by Jo McIntyre at the University of Nottingham. The research was based in three schools in the Midlands which are within socially deprived areas, exploring the reasons why twenty teachers within challenging areas and schools have chosen to embed their professional careers within these settings. It seeks to establish their motivations for t
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Frequency domain blind multiple-input multiple-output system identification
Since commercial banks play important roles in the financial markets, it is important to evaluate whether banks operate efficiently. Moreover, given increased competition from non-bank financial institutions, commercial banks should operate more efficiently than they did previously. Commercial banks might operate more efficiently if they have superior information. If this is true, bank size should not matter to the operation of the bank. Thus, as long as the bank has superior information, it wil
Author(s): Chen, Binning

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Sudan in the late 1980s: A personal view from the Oxfam Archive
This podcast is the first part of a recording made on 25 August 2005 as part of the Oxfam Archive Oral History project and is an interview with Maurice Herson, he had many interesting and challenging times with Oxfam including working in Sudan in the 80s. This podcast is the first part of a recording made on 25 August 2005 as part of the Oxfam Archive Oral History project and is an interview with Maurice Herson, Editor of Forced Migration Review and previously Deputy Humanitarian Director and He
Author(s): John Magrath, Maurice Herson

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Care transactions
Arrangements for care and support which people manage for themselves or have organised for them privately or informally tell us something about the shifting borders between funded and non-funded care, between health and social care, and between paid and unpaid care work. They also demonstrate how the reality of the mixed economy of care is played out in the arrangements which people make for care and support in their own households.
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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

3.3 Long-run costs and economies of scale

What makes it possible to offer more output for sale at a lower price? That was one of the questions with which Section 3.2 opened. Part of the answer is that the firm's cost curves, which reflect the technology it is using, may display falling average cost as output increases over a range of output levels. The other part of the answer is that market demand must be sufficient to justify successive expansions of output. A firm such as
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Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University