2.2 Nuclear fission

Every atom has a nucleus consisting of positively charged protons and electrically neutral neutrons. Protons and neutrons have virtually identical mass and the total number of protons and neutrons defines the mass number of a particular atom. The number of protons in the nucleus is the atomic number and this quantity is always the same for each particular chemical element. However, some elements have several isotopes, each with different numbers of ne
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1.6.2 The equations of uniformly accelerated motion

Equations 22, 23 and 24 provide a complete description of uniformly accelerated motion. By combining them appropriately, it is possible to solve a wide class of problems concerning the kinematics of uniformly accelerated motion. Nonetheless, those particular equations are not always the best starting point for the most common problems. For example, it is often the case that we want to know the displacement from the initial position after some specified period of constant acceleration, rather
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2.1 Introduction

Europa's surface is fascinating, if often perplexing, to study. One of its special characteristics is its brightness. It has an albedo of 0.7, which is exceeded among icy satellites only by Enceladus and Triton. (The ‘albedo’ of a body is simply the fraction of the incident light that is reflected. The higher the albedo, the more light is reflected, and the brighter the body appears.) Overall brightness is one indicator of the youth of an icy surface: the brighter the icy surface, the you
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1 The omnivores

As you work through this unit you will come across boxes, like this one, which give you advice about the study skills that you will be developing as you progress through the unit. To avoid breaking up the flow of the text, they will usually appear at the start or end of the sections.

As well as the un
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Learning outcomes

By the end of this unit you should be able to:

  • describe some of the characteristic features of carnivores;

  • outline the dentition of carnivores and its link with diet;

  • outline some of the behavioural and sensory characteristics of carnivores, with examples;

  • explain, with examples, the roles that vision and smell play in the lives of carnivores;

  • explain the variety of ways in which carnivores assemble in groups;

  • <
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8.3 Shortage of minerals

You may be familiar with salt licks that are provided for domesticated cattle. In the wild, grass is also often low in minerals (e.g. it has almost no sodium and very little calcium), so grazers may have to go to extraordinary lengths to supplement their diet with additional minerals obtained from the most unlikely places. LoM gives some examples, but the most impressive activity takes place in the caves of Mount Elgon in Kenya [pp. 113–114]. You'll probably recall this spectacular footage
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2.3 The study of a raindrop

Most of the usable water is derived from the 1.1 × 105 km3 that falls over the land surface each year as rain, snow, sleet or hail. The collective term for all of these sources of water is precipitation. At this point, you will consider the size of the drops of water that make up clouds or rain (Figure 5).

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3.2 The anatomy of the language system

Perhaps the best-known generalisation about the language system is that it is represented on one side of the brain – usually the left – more than the other. Many lines of evidence support this view. Specific impairments to linguistic abilities are known as aphasia, and aphasia results much more often from damage to the left hemisphere of the brain than from damage to the right. It is also possible to temporarily deactivate one or other hemisphere. This is usually done as an investi
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3.6 Synaptic transmission from hair cells

In addition to being sensory receptors, hair cells are also presynaptic terminals. The membrane at the base of each hair cell contains several presynaptic active zones, where chemical neurotransmitter is released. When the hair cells are depolarised, chemical transmitter is released from the hair cells to the cells of the auditory nerve fibres. Excited by this chemical transmitter, the afferent nerve fibres contacting the hair cells fire a pattern of action potentials that encode features of
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2.1 Structure and function of the outer and middle ear

Figure 1 is a diagram of the human ear. The outer ear consists of the visible part of the ear or pinna, the external auditory canal (meatus), and the tympanic membrane (tympanum) or eardrum. The human pinna is formed primarily of cartilage and is attached to the head by muscles and ligaments. The deep central portion of the
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Darwin Now Awards
Janice Ansine is a recipient of a Darwin Now Award. She is currently working on a variety of projects in Jamaica, looking at contemporary responses to Darwin and Into the historic role of Jamaica in providing material for his research.
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Series - the ratio test
This video describes how to use the ratio test to determine whether a series converges or diverges.
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Radio Lingua Network News: 26 September 2008
Happy European Day of Languages to all our listeners! By way of joining in this international celebration of languages and language-learning we're delighted to introduce eight new podcasts today. We're adding Catalan, Danish, French, Japanese, Mandarin and Romanian to our One Minute Languages series; we're introducing our first podcast for English learners - Write Back Soon will help learners master Phrasal Verbs; and we're finally announcing the long-awaited sequel to Coffee Break Spanish: it's
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Hello! My name is Roxana and I'd like to welcome you to One Minute Romanian from the Radio Lingua Network. In this podcast I'm going to be teaching you the basics of Romanian. The great thing about this language course is that you'll be learning all you need to know in just 60 seconds - or thereabouts! Each one minute language lesson will equip you with just enough Romanian to help you get by in lots of situations, either on holiday, or on a business trip to Romania, or just to impress your Roma
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Speaker(s): Professor Henry G. Overman, Alexandra Jones, Adam Marshall | Britain’s cities are facing profound challenges – both in the short run as a result of the recession and in the long run as a result of underlying structural change. In this lecture Henry Overman considers the nature of these challenges and considers what urban policy should do to help cities effectively respond to them. Henry Overman is Professor of Economic Geography at the LSE and Director of the Spatial Economics Re
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TechNet Radio: (Part 15) Building Your Hybrid Cloud - Getting Started with Automating the Hybrid Clo

In part 15 of our “Building a Hybrid Cloud” series, Keith Mayer and Andy Syrewicze show us to get started automating our hybrid cloud environment using PowerShell. Tune in for this great overview session on why IT Pros should think about automating their processes and how they can get started with the Microsoft Azure VM Agent Custom Script extensions, Azure PowerShell Module and the Azure Pack.
Author(s): ChrisCaldwell, TechNet Radio, Keith Mayer

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Rights not set

US History to 1877
Dr. James Ross-Nazzal, David White
This textbook will examine US history from the pre-Colombian era to the end of Reconstruction in 1877.

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1 Sound reception: the ear

In order to hear a sound, the auditory system must accomplish three basic tasks. First it must deliver the acoustic stimulus to the receptors; second, it must transduce the stimulus from pressure changes into electrical signals; and third, it must process these electrical signals so that they can efficiently indicate the qualities of the sound source such as pitch, loudness and location. How the auditory system accomplishes these tasks is the subject of much of the rest of this block. We will
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Copyright © 2016 The Open University

Assessment learning and teaching journal , Leeds Metropolitan University
This edition showcases key areas of work catalysed by the Institute for Enterprise and comprises a range of articles research papers, case studies and reflections by staff, students and stakeholders.
Author(s): Leeds Metropolitan University,Sue Smith

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