Acknowledgements

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All materials included in this unit are derived from content originated at the Open University.

Every effort has bee
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Tutankhamun in 3D
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King Collection - The Unfinished Work - Martin Luther King, Jr. Part One
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Biosecurity dilemmas: dreaded germs, global health and scientific freedom
Which is more dangerous, bioterrorism or biodefense? When do the security risks of pathogen research outweigh the health benefits? Is there too little or too much biosecurity regulation of Australian laboratories and scientists? Does the language of security advance or distort global health goals? In this public seminar, Dr Christian Enemark considers these and other dilemmas that arise when the protection of human health is placed on security policy agendas. Dr Christian Enemark is Associate
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Article :: Image Editing Basics for Adobe Photoshop Elements 11
This lesson begins with an overview of the core concepts behind image correction, and then introduces a range of quick and easy techniques to help you get more from your photos in just a few clicks
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Announcing Visual Studio Achievements For Windows 8 App Development

We are excited to announce an update to the Visual Studio Achievements extension: the availability of nineteen new achievements all oriented toward Windows 8 app development.

These new achievements can be earned in JavaScript, C#, VB and C++. Some examples include: I Like To Move It Move It which is earned by using the accelero
Author(s): Karsten Januszewski

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Hearing Yourself Hear
Listen in as Artist Jacob Kirkegaard tells of his journey to hear himself hear. With the aid of researchers in Copenhagen, Kirkegaard generates an artificial tone in his own ear by playing two tones at a precise ratio. He has developed this phenomenon into an interactive sound piece he calls Labyrinthitis.  (07:13)
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George H.W. Bush - Mini-Biography
A World War II veteran, George H.W. Bush served as Vice President for two terms before being elected President of the United States in 1988. (04:35)


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4.2 Reactor safety: the Chernobyl incident

By far the worst nuclear reactor accident took place on 26 April 1986 when one of four 1 GW reactors at Chernobyl in the Ukraine released a radioactive cloud over Europe (Figure 17). (See S278 video clips document.) The build-up to this accident has been related to a series of complex chemical reactions induced
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2.2 Nuclear fission

Every atom has a nucleus consisting of positively charged protons and electrically neutral neutrons. Protons and neutrons have virtually identical mass and the total number of protons and neutrons defines the mass number of a particular atom. The number of protons in the nucleus is the atomic number and this quantity is always the same for each particular chemical element. However, some elements have several isotopes, each with different numbers of ne
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1.6.2 The equations of uniformly accelerated motion

Equations 22, 23 and 24 provide a complete description of uniformly accelerated motion. By combining them appropriately, it is possible to solve a wide class of problems concerning the kinematics of uniformly accelerated motion. Nonetheless, those particular equations are not always the best starting point for the most common problems. For example, it is often the case that we want to know the displacement from the initial position after some specified period of constant acceleration, rather
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2.1 Introduction

Europa's surface is fascinating, if often perplexing, to study. One of its special characteristics is its brightness. It has an albedo of 0.7, which is exceeded among icy satellites only by Enceladus and Triton. (The ‘albedo’ of a body is simply the fraction of the incident light that is reflected. The higher the albedo, the more light is reflected, and the brighter the body appears.) Overall brightness is one indicator of the youth of an icy surface: the brighter the icy surface, the you
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1 The omnivores

As you work through this unit you will come across boxes, like this one, which give you advice about the study skills that you will be developing as you progress through the unit. To avoid breaking up the flow of the text, they will usually appear at the start or end of the sections.

As well as the un
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Learning outcomes

By the end of this unit you should be able to:

  • describe some of the characteristic features of carnivores;

  • outline the dentition of carnivores and its link with diet;

  • outline some of the behavioural and sensory characteristics of carnivores, with examples;

  • explain, with examples, the roles that vision and smell play in the lives of carnivores;

  • explain the variety of ways in which carnivores assemble in groups;

  • <
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8.3 Shortage of minerals

You may be familiar with salt licks that are provided for domesticated cattle. In the wild, grass is also often low in minerals (e.g. it has almost no sodium and very little calcium), so grazers may have to go to extraordinary lengths to supplement their diet with additional minerals obtained from the most unlikely places. LoM gives some examples, but the most impressive activity takes place in the caves of Mount Elgon in Kenya [pp. 113–114]. You'll probably recall this spectacular footage
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2.3 The study of a raindrop

Most of the usable water is derived from the 1.1 × 105 km3 that falls over the land surface each year as rain, snow, sleet or hail. The collective term for all of these sources of water is precipitation. At this point, you will consider the size of the drops of water that make up clouds or rain (Figure 5).

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3.2 The anatomy of the language system

Perhaps the best-known generalisation about the language system is that it is represented on one side of the brain – usually the left – more than the other. Many lines of evidence support this view. Specific impairments to linguistic abilities are known as aphasia, and aphasia results much more often from damage to the left hemisphere of the brain than from damage to the right. It is also possible to temporarily deactivate one or other hemisphere. This is usually done as an investi
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3.6 Synaptic transmission from hair cells

In addition to being sensory receptors, hair cells are also presynaptic terminals. The membrane at the base of each hair cell contains several presynaptic active zones, where chemical neurotransmitter is released. When the hair cells are depolarised, chemical transmitter is released from the hair cells to the cells of the auditory nerve fibres. Excited by this chemical transmitter, the afferent nerve fibres contacting the hair cells fire a pattern of action potentials that encode features of
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2.1 Structure and function of the outer and middle ear

Figure 1 is a diagram of the human ear. The outer ear consists of the visible part of the ear or pinna, the external auditory canal (meatus), and the tympanic membrane (tympanum) or eardrum. The human pinna is formed primarily of cartilage and is attached to the head by muscles and ligaments. The deep central portion of the
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